Faceted and striped

Alessia Bodini treats us to both facets and strips on her beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

Italy’s Allesia Bodini keeps her options open. When confronting the decision of whether her beads should be faceted or striped, she merely says “Yes.”

Are they cut from solid blocks of stripes? Or created as faceted beads and covered with slices of stripes? Is it too early in the week for this brain teaser?

Inquiring minds want to know. Take another look on Facebook.

 

 

Gems by the slice

Meg Newberg reveals the secrets of faceted stones on PolymerClayDaily.com

Arizona’s Meg Newberg has unlocked the secrets of gemstones with her latest tutorial.

Make the cane and then shape each slice into whatever cut you prefer- brilliant, pear, marquise, emerald?

Meg sorted out the facets and organized them into a step-by-step for those of us who work with more malleable materials.

Meg Newberg reveals the secrets of faceted stones on PolymerClayDaily.com

Don’t love to make canes? Meg also sells her diamonds in 2″ long canes ready for slicing.

Transitions smooth the look


Marina Rios smooths the look with vintage and handmade spacers on PolymerClayDaily.com

This gorgeous chunky collar from Chicago’s Marina Rios (fancifuldevices) includes thirty-one handmade polymer clay beads with textures, pits, facets, and inclusions in a soft array of greens and pinks graduated in size from large to small.

To ensure a smooth visual transition between beads Marina created special spacers including vintage rhinestone rings and gemstone rondelles. The necklace is adjustable from 19 to 21 inches.

As I composed this post, her lovely spring-like necklace sold on Etsy but have a look anyway.

Marina shares some of her methods in tutorials. If you’re thinking about making faceted beads, review her free step-by-steps here on Instagram.

 

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