Planting bits of clay

Eva Thissen captures Saturday on a bead on PolymerClayDaily.com

Germany’s Eva Thissen says that she doesn’t work as intensively with polymer these days but she still enjoys it immensely. Her current crop of minutely appliqued beads has already sold on Etsy after only days. 

Eva used to create narratives around a single character. Now her stories are bigger and focused on groups as in this community garden, part of her Saturday series.

Eva Thissen captures Saturday on a bead on PolymerClayDaily.com

It’s hard to imagine working this small. A needle, good eyes, and steady hands are the only tools required.

Re-visioning polymer

Toops on PCDaily

Peek at the polymer exhibit that began this week at Carthage College in Kenosha, WI. The opening reception for Re-Visioning: New Works in Polymer at the H.F. Johnson Gallery of Art will be held next Thursday, September 18.

Gallery staff have posted snapshots of the works on Facebook as they arrived to get us excited.

Laura Tabakman’s On the Trail is a delicate installation of a field of blossoms that emerge from the floor and climb one wall.

You can see her sitting on the gallery floor arranging every petal in what turned out to be a 15-hour operation. She says of the show, “OMG, don’t miss it!”

Here you see Cynthia Toops’ So Much Yarn, So Little Time which includes tiny knitting needles that pierce one of the balls of imitative yarn wound in Cynthia’s fastidious micro style. At one time or another all knitters and artists have shared the sentiment of the piece.

Re-Visioning on PCDaily

The event is being held in conjunction with an October polymer symposium, labs, and (in)Organic exhibit at the nearby Racine Art Museum.

The first college level polymer studio class was launched last year at Carthage College. Professor Diane Levesque taught the class and curates this exhibit.

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