Covered for the cold

Sarah Wilbanks covers for a cold winter on PolymerClayDaily.com

Seattle’s Sarah Wilbanks mixes her media so I’m only guessing that these earrings are polymer. She often starts with translucent and adds metal leaf.

Sarah says the frosty colors of this pair reminded her of winter. The outer strips hang over the underlying cones like a warm sweater.

Go look at her Instagram and see if you can identify her materials. I’m usually irked when artists don’t name their media but in this case, it’s as if the material is beside the point and I’m cool with that.

Painted pod necklace

Doreen Gay Kassel's pod necklace will turn heads on PolymerClayDaily.com

Since riotous colors have emerged as this week’s theme, we’ll revisit beads that New York’s Doreen Gay Kassel made for a swap.

After the swap, Doreen created another batch of pods, ruffles, and berries and combined them into this sumptuous necklace. She builds the beads from white clay shapes and then with an illustrator’s practiced eye, paints each one in beautiful colors.

The riot of color and shapes becomes a party necklace that will make heads turn.

Inclusions add a cosmic touch

Marina Rios mixes lots of ingredients into her cosmic rocks on PolymerClayDaily.com

Chicago’s Marina Rios (FancifulDevices) creates rustic, Victorian, tribal style mixed media assemblages. Her antique and vintage materials are heavily altered and combined with artisan components to create evocative objects.

Marina adds sand, ground and dyed oyster shell, embossing powders, pre-baked and chopped polymer and more as inclusions in the beads that stack up into this Regolith totem.

After firing, she begins painting –  back-painting, resist, dry brushing, glazing and more to give this 3.4″ stack of beads its history and mystery.

If you like it when cosmic collides with tribal in polymer, check her out on Instagram and Etsy.

That’s what the contact form is for

Linda Martin leans into her first wall art and is surprised on PolymerClayDaily

Michigan’s Linda Hoffman Martin bravely submitted her first piece of wall art to PCD via the contact form.

This lovely wire and polymer leafy shadow box reminds me of how grateful I am when artists like Linda take a risk and send a link.

She first put the piece up on the FB Hooked on Polymer group because she was proud of it. When hundreds of others agreed with her, she was surprised and emboldened to try for a wider audience.

If that little voice in your head says, “You’ve got something here!” take a chance and spread your work around. The validation can do wonders for your mojo.

Yes, that’s my cue to tell you that StudioMojo, the weekend newsletter, is another way to push yourself in new directions and shore up your enthusiasm. We’d love to have you join us. 

Layers of polymer ruffles

Victoria Mkhitarian shows us new ways with her ruffles on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Zealand’s Victoria Mkhitarian’s newest framed art makes me want to run my fingers across its many layers of pale polymer, copper and acrylic paint. She calls her series Ruffles and this closeup on Facebook gives you a better understanding of its construction.

Her Flickr photos also give you a good look at her delicate and luminous works.

Victoria Mkhitarian shows us new ways with her ruffles on PolymerClayDaily.com

The layers in her Ruffles1B (right) incorporates the same thin strips of polymer arranged vertically. In this piece, the layers are tinted with alcohol inks and she omits the copper layers.

Victoria frames these delicacies in deep shadow boxes. Yep, I’m gushing over ruffles!

A riot of summer colors

Deb Groover (Debortina) paintings are a riot of summer colors on PolymerClayDaily.com

This big summer polymer painting is from Deb Groover (Debortina) who’s at the Art Fair on the Square in Madison, Wisconsin this weekend.

Basic polymer shapes are applied to a large raw wood panel. Then flat polymer flowers and patterns in riotous summer colors are added. She paints in the background after the figures have settled themselves in. There’s such good energy in her paintings that Deb and Tina have attracted a large and loyal following.

To appreciate the size of her art, look at photos on Instagram and Facebook.

Saturday’s StudioMojo will hit the high spots and give you the rest of the summertime polymer story. Join us by signing up at StudioMojo.org.

Mini polymer paintings

Leanne Fergeus creates abstracts in polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Melbourne’s Leanne Fergeus makes you believe you’re looking at a painting on a small canvas in her most recent series of polymer and acrylic brooches and pendants.

As her 100 Day project winds down she’s just hitting her stride with a whole series of acrylics.

Go to Instagram to look closely at the rich canvas texture of these mini-paintings. She paints thickly on a larger sheet and cuts the polymer into pieces that she backs with a thick black layer.

Small piece, big story

Colorado’s Phyllis Pollena-Cahill mixes her media in this polymer and copper brooch.

Phyllis Polema-Cahill stacks up patterns in a small graceful brooch on PolymerClayDaily.com

The patterns flow into each other and keep your eye darting between the variations in the layers that cup forward. The copper accents hint at even more complexity.

It’s a delight to take in this big story in a small space. Nice start to the week, eh?

Find more of Phyllis’ story on Instagram, Facebook, and Flickr.

Art pods with zen

Marina Rios mixes Japanese cane weaving and polymer on PolymerClayDaily

Chicago’s Marina Rios (Fanciful Devices) ran out of good rocks to wrap. She’s been trying Japanese basketry ornamentation over smooth river rocks. She weaves cane reed over the center and then subtly inks it for dimension.

With no more suitable smooth rocks to work on, Marina had no choice but to make her own art pods. She covers a foil form with polymer and then goes to town with silk screened, inked, crackled, faceted and gold leafed veneers. The pod hangs on a hammered and oxidized steel ring.

On Etsy and Instagram, Marina’s mix of media has a wonderfully calming effect.

Need more calming effects? Join the StudioMojo crowd on Saturday mornings where we dig below the surface to explore the behind-the-scenes discoveries that don’t fit on the daily menu at PCD. The odd, the new, the questions and the trends we’re dealing with. Fun stuff. 

Challenging exhibit

Margaret Polcawich's 30-day challenge exhibit on PolymerClayDaily

Maryland’s Margaret Polcawich took on a 30-day challenge to create a wall of 6″x6″ pieces to be displayed at the Spitzer Art Center in Harrisonburg, VA.

The squares feature a metal flower or leaf cutout layered on a patterned polymer background mounted on a painted wood frame.

Margaret Polcawich's 30-day challenge exhibit on PolymerClayDaily

Now that she looks over the first 15 works shown here, Margaret says that she prefers the ones that weren’t finished at 2:00 a.m. (You can sympathize, right?) Examine them all on Facebook.

Impressive and almost makes you want to take on a challenge now that it’s a new month!

Thanks for all the birthday wishes yesterday. I’m Facebook-challenged and the list of well-wishers that popped up surprised and delighted!