Unexpected holiday element

Jenny Sorensen mixes her media on PolymerClayDaily.com

You may not be ready for the holidays but Jenny Sorensen (WishingWellWorkshop) won’t let you forget.

What really got me about this cardinal in the snow ornament was the unexpected element — a cinnamon stick perch! She often adds a rock or wood or some other natural element to ground her work.

The polymer is smooth and whimsical. The cinnamon adds a natural and fragrant touch. I love the holiday combo.

Suspended polymer

Georgia’s Debra Ryan (orphancakesie) exhibits a brooch suspended in a circle on the dresser. The dual-purpose use makes the piece doubly interesting. I’m guessing magnets are involved.

Debra takes an imaginative mixed media approach to her pieces. She’s a free-range polymer artist. Study her Instagram to get a glimpse of where polymer is headed.

Off-kilter polymer

Katie Oskins' off-kilter face vase on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ohio’s Katie Oskins (Katersacres) asks if anyone’s been feeling off-kilter. Who hasn’t?

You may identify with the haggle-toothed, bug-eyed face vase Katie made to illustrate her point on Instagram.

Katie has characters like these dancing in her head and flying off her fingers. If you (like me) don’t have a brain inhabited by such creatures, you can still follow along on her tutorials and join her club of sculptors.

This guy would look good with tools and pencils sticking out, creating frazzled hair.

Halloween scream and pats on the back

Karen Walker lets out a scream for Halloween on PolymerClayDaily.com

UK’s Karen Walker (Clayground) perfectly captures Halloween 2020 with her rendition of Edvard Munch’s Scream in Cernit. No gore necessary! We get the picture from this sleek, simple, wide-eyed character. Here on Facebook.

If you’re feeling ready for a cheery diversion, stop by tomorrow’s StudioMojo where we’ll be encouraging you to pat yourselves on the back for accomplishments great and small during these scream-worthy times. BYO Halloween candy. 

Polymer that snarls for you

Heather Tinkham's mixed media sister snarls when you can't on PolymerClayDaily

Bazhie, of the Support Squad, is one of 15 mixed-media figures created by Minneapolis artist Heather Tinkham for a grouping that she calls the Sister Posse.

Take a look, and then a second, deeper look, at Bazhie’s expressive, mysterious face. Yes, it’s polymer, as are the accent pieces that adorn her head and serve as her feet. At 20 inches (50.8 cm) tall, she is an imposing figure.

Heather also creates jewelry, but her interest in art-making as a force for introspection and healing is especially evident in her figurative work.

Each of the Sister Posse members has a story that represents one of the amazing gifts we bring to each other, from the strength to stand firm to the need to grieve and heal from the storms of life. Bazhie’s story is about the Gnarly Snarls of Shoulds, which is a tricky job at the best of times. Heather says “Not to worry, Bazhie’s got this Gnarly Snarl for you. Go back to doing what you can. Things will be fine.”

Heather has wisely taken advantage of the photogenic quality of the Sister Posse and offers them as inspiration cards for journaling, reflection, greeting card enclosures, or as reminders of intention. Smart move, Heather!   Posted by Maureen Carlson

Emotional polymer

Gosia expresses emotion in her pensive sculptures on PolymerClayDaily.com

This Toronto-based artist goes by the single name Gosia and works in many sculptural clays including this stunning piece, Pearl, made with polymer clay and gypsum.

The range of quiet emotions Gosia conveys in her artworks is the most important aspect for the artist who hopes to connect viewers to contemplate their deeper feelings.

Gosia creates an original bust design then casts it a number of times but changes the original image into completely different female personalities by hand sculpting Neo-romantic embellishments and fine details which makes each one singularly unique. Her colors are often very muted.

Emotion is not usually a highly discussed element in polymer clay but it’s definitely present in many polymer artists’ work. Does emotion play a part in your work?

Sometimes it is painted!

Geninne Zlatkis paints her polymer mobile on Polymer Clay Daily.com

New Mexico’s Geninne Zlatkis paints and decorates, illustrates, and photographs. Every once in a rare while, she works with polymer as in this bird mobile. Yes, they’re painted.

No complex techniques, just a love of birds, and an understanding of their shapes topped with an illustrator’s ability to translate feathers into lines and dots.

It’s a pleasure to see landscapes and architecture through her eyes.

Over at StudioMojo, this is what I look for. We cast a wider net to spotlight outlier artists who understand the importance of polymer as one of many tools in their toolbox. Come on down and see what surprises we’ve dug up for your weekend entertainment.

 

Warrior women

Maryanne Loveless makes warrior women on PolymerClayDaily.com

Utah’s Maryanne Loveless suits up her polymer power women in armor and gives them superpowers (magnets).

She calls them the Hang On girls with their articulated arms and legs. 

Maryanne Loveless makes warrior women on PolymerClayDaily.com

“Sometimes the best we can do is armor up and hang on,” says Maryanne. These make great reminders to stick on your fridge. They shout, “You can do it!”

Here she is on Etsy.

Polymer pile up

Fabi Perez Ajates piles up her jewelry on PolymerClayDaily.com

Spain’s Fabi Perez Ajates (Con Tus Manos) makes stacks of beads and bangles and brooches look like fascinating ceramic sculptures.

The holes and ridges and shapes in her imitative ceramic pieces all have dual purposes.

They can be worn or piled up in endlessly entertaining ways that form totems.

Fabi Perez Ajates piles up her jewelry on PolymerClayDaily.com

Fabi calls this her Coraline Jewelry since the pieces were inspired by oceanic reefs. 

Scroll down Fabi’s blog to see how she plays with her jewelry. (via Sue Ossenberg)