Off-kilter polymer

Katie Oskins' off-kilter face vase on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ohio’s Katie Oskins (Katersacres) asks if anyone’s been feeling off-kilter. Who hasn’t?

You may identify with the haggle-toothed, bug-eyed face vase Katie made to illustrate her point on Instagram.

Katie has characters like these dancing in her head and flying off her fingers. If you (like me) don’t have a brain inhabited by such creatures, you can still follow along on her tutorials and join her club of sculptors.

This guy would look good with tools and pencils sticking out, creating frazzled hair.

A nip in the woods

Chris Owens creates a flask for the woods on PolymerClayDaily.com

Kentucky’s Chris Owens (chris325o) uses layers of Cernit metallic clays with a touch of Sculpey Souffle white to achieve this tree bark look. She’s made a big mokume gane veneer that wraps all around the Blue Bark Flask.

Chris makes luscious mid-century modern patterns collide with woodsy colors. Usually, you hide a flask but I’d want to set this right on the table for all to admire.

Aren’t you curious to know what she used for those patterns? She’s Retrovenue on Facebook.

Polymer therapy

Mira Pinki Krispil used polymer to heal her hands on PolymerClayDaily.com

Mira Pinki Krispil surrounds her pieces with women and that feels comfortable for a Monday. The faces seem concerned and connected.

The polymer portraits have been cured on a 6 1/2″ marble vase. The other side of the vessel is covered with Mira’s bright millefiore flowers.

Some years ago she came to polymer after enduring eight surgeries on her hands. Working with clay was part of her occupational therapy and she used it to document her recovery. “Since then I can’t stop creating with this amazing material,” Mira admits.

True grit

Ginger Allman Davis remembers the true grit of her youth on PolymerClayDaily

Ginger Allman Davis (thebluebottletree) calls this her True Grit vessel made with leftover baked polymer shavings and other studio debris rolled into the thick raw clay.

It’s part of Ginger’s 100-day challenge. There’s more to the story. Her grandfather was a bit player in the original movie!

It feels like we’re in need of some true grit. We’re all trying to make sense of our circumstances right now. I’ll take this as our sign of strength for Thursday.

Polymer shows off spring’s bounty

Linda Loew assembles a stunning vase from polymer circles on PolymerClayDaily.com

Two big thick circles with a narrow slab in between are all it takes to make a stunning polymer vase like this one from Baltimore’s Linda Loew.

The periwinkle and purple colors are lush, the edges are smoothed and there’s a freeform design in the circles’ centers.

Why not show off some of spring’s bounty in a vase made especially for the occasion? Here’s Linda on Instagram.

Contrasts from the biosphere

Donna Greenberg finds her voice in the biosphere on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Jersey’s Donna Greenberg launches us into the weekend with one of the latest in her Biosphere series of small polymer vessels. Pinecone? Fungus? Her works are some combination of what appears in nature and come out of Donna’s experiences.

She says of her work, “Standing in the reeds and saw grass on the nearby Hudson River, watching a heron while viewing the Statue of Liberty is a perfect example of the kind of contrast that I look for to translate into my art.”

Donna’s polymer bio-systems flow across walls and make us more aware of our changing world.

On StudioMojo this weekend we’ll look at what appeals to us, what repulses us on the way to finding our voices. What do we have to get out of our systems? There are plenty of others on this path. You’re not alone. Come on over this Saturday.

A colorful Monday mystery

Monday is delivered on colorful dishes from fimo.passion.vb on PolymerClayDaily.com

This shallow polymer bowl and plate bring together hot colors, soothing shapes, and perfect patterns. The white edge on the bowl shows itself delicately.

Though it’s hard to tell from the photo, it seems as if the pine needles on the plate are raised…perhaps a Sutton slice.

What I can’t tell you is who the artist is other than Fimo.passion.vb who writes in French. Another Mystery Monday post.

Mystery in twelve parts

Olga Perova's patterns zig and zag around this vase on PolymerClayDaily.com

Perth, Australia’s Olga Perova showed this 7″x11″ polymer vase in the Wanaroo Arts Awards exhibit.

She is drawn to vessel shapes and bargello-like patterns. Here she combines both favorites, lining up multicolored patterns in a most meticulous way.

By my count, there are twelve segments to this piece. Can you imagine applying all those strips of clay? It seems too textural to be a cane. It is baffling.

Look more closely on Facebook and Instagram.