More than one way to Skinner…

What is a "Skinny Skinner" you ask? Lots of polymer artists attribute this variation on the Skinner blend to Dorothy Greynolds (shown here at a 2004 Columbus, Ohio workshop). Instead of the typical triangle blends, narrow rectangular bands of color totalling the width of the pasta rollers are laid side-by-side (look on the table in the picture).

Folding and rolling them through the pasta machine gives you a marvelous blend. In Santa Fe, Lindly and Maggie showed us how to refine and control this blend further. One trick is to keep the very light and very dark bands quite narrow, allowing stronger colors to prevail.

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  • reply Dorothy Greynolds ,

    Hi Cynthia,
    Thanks for putting this on your site! It is a wonderful new discovery of our guild’s. Keep up the great site!

    Dorothy

    • reply Andrea Greynolds ,

      Hi!
      Dorothy is my mom!
      Cynthia, i may know you.
      nice to see my mom all over the net!
      If you search Dorothy Greynolds on google, the whole first page is her!
      Now, when i do the same for me, all that comes up is some random obichurary writer in Flordia.
      Oh well.

      Leave a comment



      • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

        On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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