My tidbit cupboard was looking mighty bare so I was thrilled I received a link to Z Kripke. I knew Z’s work from years ago and she’s a master caner.

How disappointed was I when I found the link dated 1999 and the email bounced back? Sigh. I don’t know what’s become of Z.

Z’s work is still fun to look at.

I encourage all of you to take down the old work, put up new. We need to keep this art fresh and keep those web sites dusted and up-to-date.

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  • reply Lisa ,

    I ran across her more recent work a little while ago – she’s apparent shifted into working more with glass. I’ve seen her stuff on several websites.

    • reply Christy ,

      >>I encourage all of you to take down the old work, put up new. We need to keep this art fresh and keep those web sites dusted and up-to-date.

      Your comment hit home… 🙂 I was already thinking I needed to do a refresh of my site – I haven’t updated anything but the kaleidoscopes in quite awhile and the whole site could use an overhaul.

      Thanks for the push,
      Christy

      • reply Diane Black ,

        I beg you to reconsider this advice!. . . and instead ask those with invaluable treasure troves of polymer items to create new pages and categories for them.

        When those “old” pages are removed or even “reorganized,” it breaks all the links that anyone might have made to them (inlcuding my polymer clay “encyclopedia” website glassattic.com).

        I believe it’s also important to encourage *all* polymer clayers to explore everything they can, and to understand all the things that can be done with the medium. They’ll have a much harder time doing that if they’re never able to see those many works (which are btw often excellent examples for illustrating what might be meant by a particular technique, or comment, etc., and the great variety that’s possible within them).

        I appreciate that artists who use polymer clay may want to have only their very latest work easily seen, but it seems that that could also be accomplished without removing those treasure troves from the rest of us … perhaps continuing to add new pages, and simply relegating older things to hyperlinks somewhere less obvious on the site? (Anything which wouldn’t break the thousands of links at my website by changing any of their exact URL’s would be very appreciated!)

        Thanks for listening,

        Diane B.

        • reply Kim Kennedy ,

          Z is alive and well and working in new mediums. I don’t know her very well, just met her at our guild’s annual holiday party at her house two years ago.

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          • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

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