Fago’s site update

Vermont’s Celie Fago has updated her site and added a blog (with only one lonely post at the moment). Her gallery is full of stunning PMC works sometimes combined with polymer clay for color and texture. Though polymer plays a less prominent role in her current work, she uses it masterfully.

Take a look at my ten year old pictures from the national retreat when Celie burst on the polymer clay scene. She helped move the community from caning to carving, inlaying, and sanding the medium. The beauty of her tools made me realize how thoroughly her aesthetic permeates her life.

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  • reply Lisa ,

    I went to a polymer clay exhibit at the Kentucky Museum of Art & Craft in ’04 and one of the things that really fascinated me was the display of Celie Fago’s customized tools. Never thought before about making the things you work with be beautiful as well.

    http://www.kentuckyarts.org/exhibits/Polymer/Polymer_clay.htm

    One of the artists was a woman named Anne Schaff who made gorgeous little otherworldly figures called “witnesses” – seems to have disappeared from the PC world, her website now goes to some sort of poker site.

    • reply Tonja Lenderman ,

      I have seen some amazing polymer work these past years, but the Carved Lizard Pendant you have pictured has to be my favorite so far. I adore organic and tribal jewelry. For me, this piece encompasses both loves.

      • reply kit ,

        You know, I clicked on the photo on the right, which took me to the ’97 retreat photos… I’m just as excited by the work of 10 years ago as I am by anything done today. Celie’s work back then… wow. I LOVE that lizard piece. Makes me want to see more of the old stuff from back before I knew much about PC.

        • reply Sherry Bailey ,

          Celie is a lovely person and her work (including her tools) is and has always been gorgeous.

          My one thought, though, is if I had tools that pretty I’d constantly be worried about wrecking them!!! (Because, knowing me, I would!)

          I’ll keep my tools mostly ordinary and functional so they don’t give me a complex, but I love looking at hers!

          • reply Sera Pinwill ,

            My goodness Cynthia. What an amazing effort on your part to have collected and kept all this valuable polymer history. I agree with Kit – saying that the work of 10 years ago excites me as much as the new work of today. I read this blog every few days, and am always so grateful that it is here to keep an accurate record of our historical and emerging art and artists. Thankyou!

            • reply kit ,

              You know, Sera’s comment reminds me of something I was thinking myself. I was looking at the Polymer Art Archive website the other day and when I came upon your site, Cynthia, I thought that Elise should be collaborating with you on some of it because you have so much! I spend so much time on your site, going back, getting references… What you do is so valuable, what you have accumulated is so valuable as well. You’ve created something of an archive yourself. And we polyholics are grateful!

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              • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

                On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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