Smelly stones

Sorlien on PCDaily

You may not be drawn to Sarah Sorlien’s polymer imitative rock but there are plenty of dogs who love it!

This Philadelphia physician makes Odor Stones, hollow polymer stones that are used as hiding places for dog training and competitions. She creates these functional faux stones for a canine sport called Nosework. Now you understand the holes.

Sarah says she learned rock basics from my online class and then added her own magic ingredient – cement. “Add a little liquid clay if it gets too powdery,” she suggests. It’s cheaper than embossing powders and was already available in the garage. “Don’t get it near your eyes,” physician Sarah cautions. See more of her examples on Pinterest.

An interesting diversion from jewelry on a Thursday. PCD took an interesting diversion too and stopped posting on schedule. Technological spring fever!

Sand-washed, sun-bleached polymer

Sevva on PCDaily
Sevva on PCDaily

Elena Sevva’s latest series of necklaces look sand-washed and sun-bleached by the Israeli elements. Her Archeological series is strung on coarse twine. The one on the left is From the Beach and features a faded pencil drawing on the focal bead. Another is entitled From the Old Olive Grove.

Elena’s work is rough and worn. She’s at her best when she pulls from memories to create fragments in polymer. Each piece is full of stories, mystery and history.

She’s gathered a large trove of pieces that inspire her on her Pinterest board and she keeps a continuing catalog of her work on Flickr.

Silkscreening on Craftcast

Syndee Holt shares her secrets of silkscreening and coloring on polymer tonight (March 18) on Craftcast. She also excels at taking images from camera to computer to polymer and then bringing them to life with inks, pencils and markers. I’ll be in the front row! Come join me.

Polymer pansies

Dwyer on PCDaily

Maine’s Jayne Dwyer has jump on spring with this big and complex pansy cane. If you’ve ever grappled with a big cane, you’ll be impressed by what Jayne has achieved – complicated shading and graduated, textured colors everywhere. We’ll have to check back to see what she makes of it.

Dwyer on PCDaily

Jayne thinks in both a painterly and a 3D way which can be downright tricky. The canes are very clever puzzles.

Go through her Paper Moon Jewelry Facebook page and Pinterest boards to see how she uses slices of reduced canes. She translates her Spring fever into polymer canes just in time for St. Patrick’s Day!

Spring sprouts

Mezek on PCDaily

Slovenia’s Tina Mezek makes Circle Pins that pop with playful loops of wire and polymer accents. Tina trained as jeweler and now she mixes her media with ease.

She carves a design, then stamps, colors and uses liquid clay liberally. Her lopsided accents give her pins an extra springtime flair.

Mezek on PCDaily

Turns out, Tina teaches the methods for making these pins on CraftArtEdu. See more of her work on Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook. You won’t want to miss her angels!

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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