Start simple

The possibilities for patterns expand when you insert a cane into the tube of an extruder. Here are just a few examples from the Mammoth Cave retreat.

Mari O’Dell showed students how to position, control and combine canes. A striped cane started these petals. Slices of the resulting extrusions were shaped into flowers or reinserted into the extruder to create even more complex designs. Nancy Nearing created this lovely lotus.

The retro flower fabric (right) was an experiment with slices from my petal disk impressed on a striped background (see Debbie Crothers free tutorial).

Folded charms are made from slices of a checkerboard cane. Amy Koranek manipulates the slices into a graceful shape by lightly pressing corners together.

Will simple ideas grow into more complex ones in your studio this week?

Extruda-Palooza

Kibitlewski on PCDaily

It’s all-extruders, all the time here at the Mammoth Cave Extruda-Paloozain Kentucky. This Black Widow Spider by Ohio’s Chris Kibitlewski is mostly polymer. He makes the legs from the thinnest extruded tubes I’ve ever seen by using three disks (a corer and two circles).

Amy Koranek fills bottle caps with bits of Halloween-themed extrusions. Mari O’Dell is filling our heads with new ways of thinking about extruding that I’ll share next week.

 

Moving the furniture

Tabakman on PCDaily

Viewers at the Carthage College exhibit said that Laura Tabakman’s installation made them feel good. They described it as a meadow or a wildflower garden. The thin wires on which the flowers were mounted swayed gently as people walked by. The effect was calming, delicate, meditative and cheery.

One flower bed was tucked against the walls near the gallery entrance. A second free-standing patch of flowers created a path that guided visitors into and through the meadow.

How did she do it? Her in-process photos gathered here show how Laura moved all the furniture out of her living room to try the piece out in her Pittsburgh home. She’s used to moving the furniture. Take a look at some of her previous works.

Look who’s trending

Campbell on PCDaily

The UK’s Lizzie Campbell (Clay Disarray) has thrown polymer right into the middle of popular culture with her Breaking Bad Polymer Poster.

Campbell on PCDaily

“Much of my personal work is inspired by my love of films – particularly horror and dark genre, as well as slightly smaller independent films – and all of the ‘polymer posters’ I’ve worked on are for films that have creatively inspired me in some way,” she admits.

She only began with polymer a year ago and her polymer popstars, politicians and posters are quite the rage. What fun to flip through them on her site, store and in recent press. Even her business name makes you smile.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you.

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