Encased in polymer

Fischer-Katz on PCDaily

Perhaps you can identify with Edith Fischer-Katz’ (Zoota) sculpture titled Hide this Monday morning.

The small figure is encased in a polymer imitation knitted suit with a zipper up her back. It’s part of a series of mostly nude figures covered with flowers, moss, stitches or knitted embellishments.

Edith’s figures have previously been very representational and this series on Flickr seems to move in a different, more pensive direction that will be interesting to watch. You’ll also find her on Facebook and her website.

No need to hide. Let’s get this week started!

Glacial polymer

Tserenbadam on PCDaily

The fine layers in this pendant from Switzerland’s Enkhe Tserenbadam make it look like a sculpted glacier. Bits of silver leaf accent the thin striations.

Enkhe grew up in Mongolia and these forms seem so personal and intuitive that it makes you wonder if she saw them as a child.

The fine ball chain is baked into the polymer, a good solution for this pendant. Enkhe shows a burst of new jewelry and vessels on Facebook and Flickr.

The beauty of her many layers may prompt you to go thinner and thinner with your next piece to see what happens.

Right and wrong

Enkhe clarified that the shapes really do relate to her childhood, in fact they were medicinal. Read her comment below. But there is no metal leaf in her piece.

Slivered polymer

ford/forlano on PCDaily

Steve and Dave (FordForlano) reveal just enough of their new work to whet our appetites. These thick rope necklaces are made of thin oblique slivers of canes. The unfinished bits and pieces they reveal are works in progress for the November 10-13 Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft show,

Peek at the tweaks and twists (more complex components) they’ve given their latest work on their Facebook page. You can also examine the bits waiting for inspiration and assembly on David’s work surface in Santa Fe.

Their work has evolved while at the same time it’s circled back to some themes that were there from the beginning. What themes have persisted in your work?

Simple curves

LN Jewels on PCDaily

Sometimes a simple sensual curve and a hollow spot add to the allure of a piece. Here a mokume gane veneer drapes gently over a flat back layer and a cord slides easily through the middle of the resulting pendant.

France’s LN Jewels Creation sprinkles tantalizing design bits throughout her polymer works on Instagram and Facebook.

The land of What If

Yuhr on PCDaily

One benefit of teaching is what the students teach you. Look at this imaginative Miro-like polymer inlay from Florida’s Lynn Yuhr (TheFlyingSquirrelStudio).

My class in Georgia focused on making polymer art for the domestic environment. Students quickly embraced the concepts and happily dressed up sticks, covered paper forms, and drilled holes in whatever wood they could find to inlay. You could see their attitudes change as the possibilities expanded.

Yuhr on PCDaily

Lynn brought wooden jewelry components with her to our class. She and her Florida friends at Banyan Bay are tinkering with wooden beads that can be inlaid. While they were originally thinking of designs for bead weavers, Lynn urged them to consider polymer inlay as well. The new products should be available soon.

Once you enter the land of what if, a whole new world of possibilities opens up.

Autumn leaves

Screws on PCDaily

These tiny maple leaf earrings by Michigan’s Sue Screws called to me every time I walked by this display during my weekend class at Creative Journey Studio in Georgia.

Sue made these delicate cutouts for a number of types of trees in fall colors with intricate veining and realistic colors. I couldn’t resist wearing these on my long drive back to Ohio.

You can enjoy a few more photos from the weekend here and here. (Sue is hard to find on ine, try Facebook.) Back to our regular schedule tomorrow.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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