Soothing pinks

Dayl Goulsbra-Jones makes a stash of soothing pink canes on PolymerClayDaily

Normally, pink isn’t what you’d think of as a soothing color. But these pinkish canes from the UK’s Dayl Goulsbra-Jones (Planet.Isis) provide the perfect stress-reliever.

The patterns are organized and repetitive and well-executed. Look at them and exhale.

I should have more to say, but I don’t. They make me giddy. Think pink.

Ways of working

Bridget Derc puts her heart on the wall on PolymerClayDaily.com

Did Monday’s post sound distressed? Thanks for your condolences. You know how those moments go. I finished in the nick of time and the box is in the mail. I’m over it.

Then I came across Briget Derc’s latest wall piece for her home and I’m humbled. It’s so complex and multi-layered.

Bridget Derc puts her heart on the wall on PolymerClayDaily.com

There’s a difference between “must-make-25 quickly” and making something that you’ll walk by every night on your way to the bathroom for the next 10 years. No judgments, it’s just a different way of working.

Much of Bridget comes through in her intense 12″x12″  polymer painting. She shows a fascinating step-by-step on Flickr.

Midnight oil polymer

Cynthia Tinapple makes last-minute swap items on PolymerClayDaily.com

I was about to hang an “out of order” shingle on the blog today. I have 24 swap items that need to get in the mail tomorrow.

Why not let you see my kitchen counter/studio in a frantic mess as I cut out my flowers? A couple of tools I need are in the “real” studio, of course.

It’s a flower theme. These are flowers that will be put on wires/stakes to grace gardens. We try not to be competitive but who are we kidding? I made my own templates from takeout containers. (I seem to have a lot of those.) That’s a story for later.

Twelve more cutouts and I can go to bed. You’re not seeing the finished product. With any luck, I can group them for a shot tomorrow. Yawn! Wish me luck. Procrastinators unite!

Button update

Helene JeanClaude uses polymer to update your wardrobe on PolymerClayDaily.com

Monday can be a shock to the system and sometimes it helps to start slowly. What could be easier than buttons?

These simple gems from France’s Helene JeaneClaude have a surprising sophistication. The shape is common but the patterns are exciting. Some have a fiber look, others could be stone.

She may have used silkscreens over marbled clay. Go to her Instagram to see lots of others. Helene has been in a button mood lately and her methods change from batch to batch.

Swap out ho-hum buttons with your own fashionable versions. Two holes in a colorful slab of polymer and you can extend the life of your favorite sweater or jacket.

Fashion Friday

Aliza Cochran goes for drama on PolymerClayDaily

How can this tattooed and pierced young thing who looks so together be the “mother of four”? Indiana’s Aliza Cochran (velvetorangedesigns) brings us Fashion Friday.

I would want to be her but then I’d have four kids to raise. Better to be a grandma.

Aliza continually posts on Etsy and comes up with cool new designs in the middle of the night.

Her specialty is solid color cutouts with lots of dangly bits that shout, “Look over here!”

Sometimes it’s nice to leave all the techniques behind and just go for drama.

Speaking of drama, come on over to Saturday’s StudioMojo. If you’re looking to stay ahead of the curve and need a creative breathmint for the week ahead, you’ll enjoy how we dish about the latest.

Rambling rose

Allie Robinson stretches clay to the limits on PolymerClayDaily.com

Melbourne’s Allie Robinson (irisheyes6868) follows her fingers as she plays with clay. They have been leading her to a world of textures. This floral tile is covered with what looks like miles of ultra-thin spiraling ruffled-edged ribbons of clay. Other experiments are covered with bumps and dents and flourishes.

When most artists flock left to liquid polymer, Allie heads right to acrylic paint. Some of her earrings are painted with crazy intense dots. She hears a different drumbeat.

You can tell that Allie is just getting up to speed with her ideas and her hands are trying to keep up. She’ll be one to watch on FB and IG.

Scrap zeitgeist

Ron Lehocky uses Laurie Prophater's scrap to make sense of our world on PolymerClayDaily.com

What is it about these scrap collaborations that seem so au courant? Ron Lehocky uses Laurie Prophater’s scrap veneers to make controlled, comprehensible patterns. Ron makes order out of what looks like colorful chaos.

That’s what we’re hungry for.  Wouldn’t we all like to know how to make beauty and sense of what swirls around us?

Ron Lehocky uses Laurie Prophater's scrap to make sense of our world on PolymerClayDaily.com

Enough with the philosophy. How does Ron tap into fashion and zeitgeist at the same time? It has to do with his special brand of Ronnie Gane and the long threaded rod you see in this photo.

I’m hoping that he’ll jump in here to explain the mystery. Here’s the back story.

Ron is mighty close to reaching his goal of 50,000 hearts sold to benefit the Kids’ Project in Kentucky.

Patterns that light up

MelaMelanie Allan lights up translucent kaleidoscope canes on PolymerClayDailynie Allan lights up polymer with translucent kaleidoscope canes on PolymerClayDaily

Australia’s Melanie Allan (innervisionpc) lights up her polymer! What looks like a lovely glass bottle covered with polymer cane slices comes to life when lit from within.

Melanie definitely has a “cane brain” that gravitates to very complex patterns that she brings to life in big kaleidoscope canes.

Melanie Allan lights up translucent kaleidoscope canes on PolymerClayDaily

Here’s the surprising part. Melanie zooms out from the big kaleidoscope and focuses back in on the juiciest, most spectacular smaller patterns. Those smaller patterns she features in earrings.

When you look at her IG and FB, concentrate on big pattern/small pattern to follow how she moves in and out.

Kristen Oxtoby updates the 60’s aesthetic

Kristen Oxtoby's earrings have a 60's-inspired aesthetic with a 90's soundtrack on PolymerClayDaily.com

Many of Kristen Oxtoby’s designs (These Hollow Hills) rely on extruded clay laid down together to make corrugated shapes. Here, ball chain dangles from the bottom of her Farrah earrings. And in her Circa series, the polymer strings wind around circle cutouts.

Kristen Oxtoby's earrings have a 60's-inspired aesthetic with a 90's soundtrack on PolymerClayDaily.com

Kristen’s pieces are big and bold. She calls it “…a ’60s-inspired aesthetic with a 90’s soundtrack.”

This North Carolina artist makes collections that have attitude. Get the full effect on her Instagram.

NYTimes: Polymer for anxiety

Rebecca Ackermann cures anxiety on PolymerClayDaily.com

In Thursday’s NYTimes, San Francisco’s Rebecca Ackermann reinforces the joys of polymer in her article called, I Cured My Pandemic Anxiety by Making Tiny Food Out of Clay.

She watched friends extract comfort from cooking and tried that. “It was just another thing I was failing at,” she says. She moved on to tie-dye, yoga, face painting, and more. One day she bought some polymer clay to pass the hours with her daughter.

You know the rest of the story!

“My daughter and I still do clay together when she’s in the mood, but she gets angry if her results don’t look like mine. So I’m working to teach her the word “experiment” and the notion that each time she tries, the trying makes her better. It’s a lesson I’m still learning at the end of every strange, horrible, or hopeful day in quarantine when I sit down with my clay and my little tools and I try again to make one small piece of the world just right.” Rebecca is on Instagram and Twitter.

Thanks to Seth Savarick (still in Chicago, moving to Palm Springs) for pointing PCD to this article. If you’re ready to get more newsy bits in one weekly digest, sign up for Saturday’s StudioMojo.