Tutorial in the works

Pavla Cepelikova promises a tutorial on PolymerClayDaily.com

These colors from Prague’s Pavla Cepelikova (Saffron Addict) vibrate against each other in the most interesting way as the strips of clay wind around in her Confetti brooch.

She promises that a tutorial is in the works. I’ll let my eyes figure out why the colors in her Manhattan brooch below stop me in my tracks. 

Pavla Cepelikova promises a tutorial on PolymerClayDaily.com

In the meantime, visit her on Flickr and Etsy.

Note that there were a couple mistakes in yesterday’s Angel post (like Ron’s address) that have been corrected.

Monday illusion

Lindsey Hansen swirls black and white into a 3D cane on PolymerClayDaily.com

Lindsey Hansen (Vivid Clay) lures us into the week with a tempting cane design that fools the eye with its 3D illusion. She covered a straight-sided jar with the slices and replaced the lid with a cork top.

Using black and white, she layers and stacks blends strips of blended clay into a square cane. 

Lindsey Hansen swirls black and white into a 3D cane on PolymerClayDaily.com

Lindsey shared her step-by-step how-to photos on the Hooked On Polymer page on Facebook. Several HOP members tried it with success and Ron Lehocky sent us the link.

If cane-building seems too much for your Monday brain, you can purchase Lindsey’s raw versions on Etsy.

Mud cloth Monday

Kathleen DeQuence Anderson's polymer mud cloth on PolymerClayDaily.com

These mud cloth pattern Bogolanfini polymer bangles strike a balance between tribal and contemporary jewelry. The colors are perfect and the patterns are purposely loose and energetic.

Each bracelet is formed from two curved mud cloth-patterned tube beads and four spacers joined with a twist. Another version joins over a wider cuff.

They’re from Massachusetts’ Kathleen de Quince Anderson and she sells some of her polymer creations at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. See her signature heart box and most current works on Instagram.

Interest in the background

Carola Greiser's Norwegian knitted background on PolymerClayDaily.com

Caner Carola Greiser (polymerclayshed) from Texas starts our week with a black and white background cane. Carola made the cane specifically to frame her moose cane.

But who wouldn’t welcome the sketchy dashes and lines of this composition to enhance a larger design? It has the look of a Norwegian knitting pattern.

Carola uses her designs to cover crochet hooks, card cases,  pens, and other small items that you can see on Instagram and Etsy.

Mean mason jar

Pamela Carmen's big florals cover a jar in a hurry on PolymerClayDaily.com

Florida’s Pamela Carman makes a mean Mason jar. This big floral one has actually been upcycled with one of those fancy liquid soap pumps.

The background for her flowers is textured white clay. Pamela’s big blooms allow her to create a quick composition without having to cover every inch of the glass jar with pattern.

She shows a bunch of them on Instagram if you’re in a handmade gifty mood.

If your mood has gotten grinchy and fed up with the pressures of the season already, join us over at StudioMojo where we help you keep your priorities balanced and your mojo bopping along. 

Olive green with jealousy

Sliced stripes from Sandra Trachsel on PolymerClayDaily.com

Switzerland’s Sandra Trachsel says of her bracelet inspired by an Irish Quilt pattern, “It is actually not a cane, but striped patterns cut and burnished together.”

I was certainly fooled. You’ll have to read the descriptions on each of her photos on Flickr to be sure you’ve guessed the technique correctly.

Her olive green diamonds pendant may stump you too. She created the basic color pattern, positioned a silk screen over the color shapes and added paint in perfect register. Impressive, eh?

When my studio gets messy, you may note that PCD posts gravitate to neatniks and perfectionists who control the clay so well. The reason for my change in focus contains equal parts jealousy and admiration.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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