Hot hands for custom clay

Karen Lewis (Klew) mixes a custom clay for this cane on PolymerClayDaily.com
Karen Lewis (Klew) mixes a custom clay for this cane on PolymerClayDaily.com

California’s Karen Lewis, (Klew) spent a day planning and mixing colors for this stylized horse. The cane is made of a custom blend Klew calls Fremo.

“My Fimo was quite aged – 15 years or more – and my Premo was fresh. My hands are very hot so creating my own brand is just right for me,” she says. Here are some of her hand tips.

This design by Klew pays tribute to the style of Laurel Birch with a combination of strongly defined areas and painterly backgrounds.

Customers were standing in line on Facebook, waiting to see how she’d use the figure in her distinctly southwestern pairing of stones and beads and spirited images.

Tomorrow’s StudioMojo contains an impromptu session with Carol Blackburn as she assembles one of her impossibly neat and graphic canes. She makes her methods look so simple. Join us. 

Step by step with Loretta Lam

Loretta Lam steps us through a necklace to start the week on PolymerClayDaily.com

There’s nothing juicier than a step-by-step from Loretta Lam to kick off the week. First, the sketchbook magic pulls us in. Then the jumble of companion canes brings color into the equation.

“I spend a lot of time on the palette. I know the feelings that I want to convey and it has to be just right. In this case – fresh, vibrant and youthful but still sophisticated,” says Loretta.

Loretta Lam steps us through a project to start the week on PolymerClayDaily.com

The naked bead forms seem dark before she brightens them with slices of patterns.

If you go to her Facebook page, you’ll find a slideshow in which she arranges and completes the necklace plus lots more pictures to encourage you to trot off to your workspace.

Loretta will be teaching her Designing with Distinction methods in Durfort, France in October and in Monza, Italy in September.

Terrazzo canes

Nikolina Otrzan's tutorial updates the spattered look with a new cane technique

Just as I was admiring the speckled heishi beads in yesterday’s post, Croatia’s Nikolina Otrzan unveiled her new terrazzo cane tutorial for what she calls a Pixie Cane.

Artists from Pier Voulkas to Angela Bahrenholtz to Alice Stroppel and others have come up with methods of making multicolor terrazzos.

Nikolina’s variation is tighter, neater, more intense. I ran to my studio to see if I could do it. My first effort was satisfying even though I was working with too-soft clay. These blocks will make great veneers. Nik is planning another tutorial that will cover projects made using the patterns.

Caners will be pleased to achieve a random pixelated look that goes beyond a surface effect. Yesterday’s spattered beads from Marina Rios were created with what I’m guessing were low-fire enamel powders. You know how it is when you hit upon a method that’s right up your alley? I couldn’t contain my enthusiasm.

Blooming bowls

Nancy Nearing has played with polymer for 25 years. Two years ago she gave up her stressful day job, bought a tent and decided to go full bore into her art.

We’re neighbors and I can testify about how diligently Nancy services her seven galleries, produces for fairs, teaches and searches for new opportunities.

Still she makes time for coffees and guild meetings. Nancy is not a shy artist who works quietly alone. Her energy comes from groups so she rents space at the downtown Columbus Idea Foundry where she rubs shoulders with all kinds of artists who have kept her moving forward.

Her dramatic blossom bowls are one of her signature pieces. She’s found a way to securely adhere the layers of cane slices that form her bowls and she often tops each one with an air plant.

Look at Nancy’s new website, Instagram, Etsy and Facebook to see how much energy and talent she brings to her new job.

Loose and tight polymer

Dwyer on PolymerClayDaily.com

The painterly backgrounds on these flower canes from Maine’s Jayne Dwyer accentuate the realistic flower images.

The backgrounds are not just Skinner blends, they are chunky blends of companion colors that blend into brush strokes and set off the main images.

Dwyer on PolymerClayDaily.com

You may be wowed by Jane’s realistic scenes in polymer on her sales site here and on Facebook. If want to see what inspires her, visit her Pinterest boards.

Be sure to look at her latest teapot to see how Jayne gives salvaged items new life by applying her slices to them.

 


Polymer plaid

Enjoy the festive simplicity of a plaid cane from Katie Oskin (KatersAcres). The design may remind you of the holiday tablecloth waiting to be pulled out for upcoming celebrations and meals.

Katie used the cane to create accessories for a batch of her Merry Moose figures. You can see more of her work on Facebook and her site.

What could you whip up with four or five colors and this easy over/under design? Enjoy your weekend!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


  • Here are 4 ways to get daily posts


  • Download your FREE eBook
    7 Great Ways to Teach Yourself Polymer Clay.
    Contains 62 free resources for learning polymer clay online.

    Click here to download.