Bead and Button Classes

There are some great polymer clay classes listed during the June Bead and Button Show in Milwaukee. The picture at the left shows a sample from Nan Roche’s extrusion class. Other teachers include Celie Fago, Christi Friesen, Diane Villano, Jackie Truty, Lindly Haunani, Lisa Pavelka, Kim O’Neill, Julia Sober and Pat Kimle.

I was looking for a class that would teach me how to construct those bountiful bracelets from yesterday’s posting. But they’re filled already! Book your classes online now.

Toops in Tucson

If you can get to Obsidian Gallery in Tucson before April 15, you’re in for a treat. Cynthia Toops is showing some of her new work with Chuck Domitrovich at the gallery. The meticulousness of her micro mosaic work and the brilliance of her designs are nothing short of spectacular.

There aren’t many pictures on Obsidian’s site…just enough to whet your appetite.

Or if you’re on the east coast during March, stop in at Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, Massachusetts and see the newest works from Ford and Forlano.

For larger pictures of their latest works (plus lots of other wonderful jewelers’ works), visit the Bellagio Gallery in Asheville, North Carolina.

Spring on Glass

Klew has come up with luscious spring colors in polymer clay cane slices that she applies over glass beads. She also adds polymer embellishments to resin base beads (like these). Check out the ideas in her photo gallery.

Ronna Sarvas Weltman sent me a huge list of links and I think that’s where I found both today’s post and yesterday’s. If I’ve attributed this to the wrong person, let me know. Those photo gallery sites are such huge reservoirs of work that I’d never find these gems without you viewers. Thanks.

You may need sunglasses…

…for the eyepopping colors on Ronit Golan’s site.

It must be bright in Haifa, Israel where Rita and her students are fanatic cane makers. I’m fascinated by the color palettes of various cultures and climes.

This week I’m ready for color and spring and Ronit’s site is nothing if it’s not colorful. It’s Monday! Wake up and smell the polymer clay.

Back to Basics

I’m still collecting great "simple" polymer art. Here’s Helen Breil’s brooch which combines good color, surprising texture and great shape. Simple and very effective.

Her site contains more examples.

Readers have prompted me to make some clarifications and upgrades. I’ll be modifying the navigation to make the new photo gallery more prominent (that’s new and I wasn’t sure it would work…but it does).

Pingree is a mystery to some viewers. It was my initial posting made at the request of the Rocky Mountain group and it’s password protected because they’re shy. I’ll move it to a less prominent spot but I have to thank them for launching me.

Howard, the Italian Pongo man, added a clarification. First, Pongo is plasticene and it doesn’t harden. Second, Howard is from New York! The site is a stitch…even if it isn’t polymer and he isn’t Italian.

Your comments and tips are very important to me. Thanks and keep ’em coming.

Think young

I’m a great fan of what young designers are doing with polymer. Florida’s Heather Wynn shows us some terrific examples. Her transfers and mokume gane show a different way of applying and using the media.

Heather’s ideas are showcased nicely by her web site. I’m fond of the way she photographs her work…soft, from many angles, with uncomplicated backgrounds, a bit mysterious. Usually I have a bias against "flash" web sites and this one loads slowly. It’s worth the wait. Her polymer works are in galleries 2, 3, and 4. And thanks to Jan Norwood for the tip!

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