Tips and Tricks

Dots with a twist

Gail Garbe takes dotted tube steps forward on PolymerClayDaily.com

I flinched when this necklace from Ontario’s Gail Garbe popped up on my screen. “That looks remarkably familiar,” I thought.

Then I had to laugh at myself when I realized that Gail took my Saturday Craftcast class and stayed up late coming up with her own twist on the concept. I must have done something right! Gail extruded the tubes and added the dots perfectly.

Then she added her own off-kilter gaily colored spacer beads. It all works!

This is what teachers hope to see – students who take their concepts to the next level. Gail has taught me a thing or two!

Going dotty

Cynthia Tinapple's all-polymer dot necklace on PolymerClayDaily.com

My dotted necklaces are all-polymer and fun to make. They’re so simple that I felt I needed to “up my game” for my Craftcast class this Saturday so I quickly (last night) made a Rex Ray, mid-century modern inspired version with colors I had on hand.

Cynthia Tinapple's all-polymer dot necklace on PolymerClayDaily.com

The design had been rolling around in my head. Do you have a design that needs to be brought to life?

Join us on Craftcast to learn my tricks and create your own look. For 30% off use the code: summer2020

You’ll note that I’m claiming a new hair color thanks to quarantine and mother nature. And I’ve adjusted cynthiatinapple.com to reflect my mentoring and class projects.

For more behind-the-scenes chatter, join us at StudioMojo for a weekly update each Saturday. 

Toying with polymer

Belinda Ashton makes easy, cheery links on PolymerClayDaily.com

UK’s Belinda Ashton appeals to the toddler in us with this necklace of multi-colored circles.

The tag should probably include a warning about not chewing on the luscious links. The big links are certainly something a wearer would twirl and play with.

What surprised me was how Belinda created this. My brain went directly to extruded clay. But I was wrong. Its construction was super simple.

In these complicated times, innocent, straightforward, cheery designs are important.

Desert visions in progress

John and Corliss Rose are grateful for their quarantine creating on PolymerClayDaily.com

John and Corliss Rose are grateful to be creating in their quarantine corral, otherwise called their California studio.

This Mojave Bouquet was a product of an “In Progress” box of odds and sods that they’re giving new life.

John and Corliss Rose are grateful for their quarantine creating on PolymerClayDaily.com

The brooch is 3″ x 2.25″ with a fabricated sterling silver back and mechanism which you can see in these front and back photos.

Do you have odds and sods waiting to be turned into something remarkable? What better time than now to use what you have?

Monday head scratcher

Melanie West joins fabric and polymer in new ways on PolymerClayDaily.com

Maine’s Melanie West posts daily on Facebook about an astonishing array of artists that she’s discovered.

She rarely reveals what she’s working on.  But in a July feature, she shows a new series brooches that she calls Fabric Rocks. Polymer is involved but she’s done a sleight of hand so that it’s difficult to tell what’s fabric, what’s textured polymer, and how the pattern is created.

She’s probably proudly smirking at having stumped us with her new tricks on a Monday. What’s your guess?

Succulent Skinners

Anna Nell makes blends for her new succulents on PolymerClayDaily.com

What would Poland’s Anna Nell make with the Skinner blends she showed on Instagram? A few days later she gives us the answer.

Anna Nell makes blends for her new succulents on PolymerClayDaily.com

She says she uses translucent clay, porcelain (I’m guessing she means pearl), and glow in the dark (she calls it “night effect”). She added pastels as well and some gold leaf for bling

Anna surrounds herself with a large collection of succulent inspirations so it’s difficult to distinguish real from polymer.

Turning wine into water creatures

Donna Greenberg turns wine into Hydra sculptures on PolymerClayDaily.com

New York’s Donna Greenberg creates Hydra, a 3-spout vessel built over glass bottle forms.

Donna bonded the wine bottles together with Apoxie clay and covered them with Ultralight which she sculpted and painted. Watching the process on Facebook is fascinating.

Donna Greenberg turns wine into Hydra sculptures on PolymerClayDaily.com

Could you envision a prickly, sculptural multi-headed water monster emerging from your recycle bin?

Simple, modern polymer

This simple “Commits” necklace from UK’s Caroline Casswell exudes summer fun and playfulness.

Caroline admits that her inspiration comes from the famous Kapitza Studio. Their sharp geometrics influence modern design and give us wake-up colors for a Monday.

No clasps, just bright beads spaced out on a buna cord. Simple becomes sophisticated.

 

Garden elements

Cecile Bos will combine these elements into a garden scene on PolymerClayDaily.com

You probably have some questions about how France’s Cécile Bos (11prunes) creates these delicate canes.

How big are the original canes (these seem impossibly small), what’s her inspiration?

Cecile intends to mix up these canes. The white background surrounding each of them ensures that she can combine the elements into a larger botanical image.

Here’s a previous similar cane to give you an idea where she’s headed. Cecile brings a fabric designer’s sensibility to polymer. We are used to kaleidoscoping and repeating designs. These are complex canes from a different perspective.

Snagged by canes

Marni Southam from Australia’s Oleander Avenue hosted the FriClay challenge last week. The topic was Shibori and these are the canes she came up with to illustrate the concept. They’re a fresh, Aussie, updated Shibori.

My eye keeps getting snagged by canes. I tidied my laundry room/pandemic studio. I feel a tug on my sleeve from my inner little girl artist plaintively saying, “It’s only two colors. We could try this.” She really wants to play. It’s time to let her/us have some fun.

Do you have a younger-you asking for some playtime?