Winter cardinals on your shoulder

Illinois’ Linda Webb (Creekside Mosaic) captures both the male and female cardinals in her latest mosaic brooches.

Linda Webb puts cardinals on your shoulder on PolymerClayDaily.com

Both of these are plentiful on midwest feeders at this time of year. The bright red flashes are like natural holiday decorations.

They’re also fluttering on her Etsy page along with several smaller mosaic molds in case you’d like to try your hand at Linda’s brand of mosaics.

Slabs just for fun

Ashley of heyletsclay delights in holiday decorating on PolymerClayDaily.com

Often slab earrings seem too repetitive and predictable. Where’s the fun, the heart, the Christmas spirit?
Oregon’s Ashley (heyletsclay) brings the delight back to holiday decorating. She drapes and tangles Christmas lights on a white background using extruded strings as cords and dots as lights. She cuts the meandering results into a bunch of shapes. Using an assortment of cutters, her carefree dance turns into pins, earrings, charms, and ornaments.

There’s the spirit! Bet the kids would like this!

FRIDAYFOLLOW: Artsyshinycloud

Zula sees polymer patterns in animal faces on PolymerClayDaily.com

Raccoons have such graphic, distinctive faces. Put crowns on their heads and blush on their cheeks and what have you got? Earrings from Australia’s Zula (Artsyshinycloud).

If unicorns or swans or butterflies are more to your liking, her Etsy site contains a whole menagerie of joyful animal designs carefully rendered in polymer


Saturday’s StudioMojo is positively bursting with the most interesting new ideas from my time in Kentucky. All that stored energy from our confinement had to leak out eventually. And yes, there are new road-tested tools that we couldn’t wait to order. Come on over for a look-see. 

Festive critters

Nichol Johnson calls out her Christmas creepies on PolymerClayDaily.com

Just when we thought Halloween was over, New York’s Nicole Johnson (mealymonster) shows us how we can extend the monster season.

But then Nicole (and plenty of other polymer sculptors) envision monsters lurking around every imaginable event. I can’t conjure up these creatures but I’m fascinated by what fantasies lurk in the minds of other artists.

Alberta Einstein

Anita Benhan interprets Alberta Einstein in clay on PolymerClayDaily.com

Was Ohio’s Anita Behnen thinking of me when she designed her new line of mixed-media sculptures? White hair, dots?

Turns out she calls her new imp Alberta Einstein and the story is that learning new math has turned her hair white. (Anita’s creatures all have stories.) It’s not about me at all.

PCD shows you the latest…you won’t find this on Anita’s FB because I’m at my first in-person event since, well you know when. I forgot how energizing and exciting and exhausting these events are. That hasn’t changed.

And hats off to the new people who jumped into this group (organized by Ron Lehocky and his group). It’s brave to jump into a group of buddies who have known each other for years. Hats off to Carla Bull, Priscilla Andrews, Paula Kennedy, and Lynn Abernathy who took the first-time plunge into the Kentucky event. Being creative takes courage, jump into a group in your area.


StudioMojo will be chock full of pictures of cool, crazy, new polymer ideas from Texas to Nebraska from brave artists who ventured vaccinated into the heart of Kentucky to get their groove back. Sign up now to get tomorrow’s edition.

Masks as spirit homes

Bali’s Jon Stuart Anderson takes masks to a whole new level with this 15.8 x 9.4 x 2.8-inch beauty.

In Bali, the gods are considered to be present in all things and art-making is revered. Masks are created as beautiful ‘homes’ for the spirits and energies to dwell in when they visit the physical world.

Look at all the eyes and imagery in Jon’s mask. There are multiple colors in every cane. Even solid colors are actually made of several shades.

Look deeply at this spirit home.

Halloween hearts

Bones on Ron Lehocky's hearts? Sure! on PolymerClayDaily.com

What? We haven’t crowed about Kentucky’s Ron Lehocky for ages! This Halloween Heart feature will fix that!

Here are some of Ron’s latest with two of my favorite ingredients…dots (of course) and canes from Nebraska’s Ivy Niles (ikandyclay).

Every bone is incredibly detailed. To achieve such precision Ivy probably reduced the parts in sections. Can’t you imagine her humming,”…the hip bone’s connected to the thigh bone.. ” as she reduced and assembled these tiny, tiny guys?  (She still has a few on her Etsy site!)

Ron has recently collaborated with super-caners Jon Anderson and Jayne Dwyer for some other knock-your-socks-off hearts too. And they’re all for the Kids.


We’ll start the party this Saturday with more goblins and ghoulies and candy in Saturday’s StudioMojo. No costumes required. Sign up here.

Race: through clay and conversation

Kathleen Dustin and Donna Greenberg install New Hampshire polymer exhibit

Artists Kathleen Dustin and Donna Greenberg relax after installing an exhibit of seven black and seven white women who used artistic expression to confront the issue of race. The exhibit at the 2 Villages Art Society in Contoocook, NH opens this Saturday. Read the story and see the art here in the Concord Monitor.

Using polymer to reckon with race through art on PolymerClayDaily.com

The women have met online every other week since early 2020. Repair, despair, awaken, rise – these are some of the words that came up as we grappled with the thorny issues of racial justice in the United States. We each chose one word to illustrate in polymer.

My word was feeling and I show our members working through strong emotions. Each square is a silk photo transfer on polymer.

The exhibit begins on Saturday, runs through November 13, and will travel to other venues in 2022. More about the group on Instagram

FOLLOWFRIDAY: Kristin Vaughn

Kristin Vaughn assembles her fabric canes for her huge audience on PolymerClayDaily.com

Iowa’s Kristin Vaughn (ShopHillsideStudio) boasts about her booming polymer business. If you’ve been tracking canes that repeat in a fabric-like method you’ve probably ended up at Kristin’s site. You’ve got to have a vision, an eye-pleasing palette, and scads of small graphic canes to make this work. Kristin has all of that.

She’s been working with polymer for 6 years and has a whopping 141,000 followers. I can’t fathom that. Kristin welcomes your mucking about in her site where you can watch her assemble these babies.


It’s Friday! Consider this post an invite to join us for our StudioMojo Happy Hour on Saturday. I’d love to pop my flashy, chatty roundup of the best in polymer in your inbox. Come dish with us.