Move along

Galka Vasina's creatures gallop across your chest on PolymerClayDaily.com

Their legs gallop as Russia’s Galka Vasina’s creatures romp across your shirt.

Galka Vasina's creatures gallop across your chest on PolymerClayDaily.com

Nothing fancy here. Cutouts, textures, fun colors. Layers of polymer stacked up. It’s the movement that really rings our chimes.

How can something so simple be so satisfying? Why question it? It works!

Galka Vasina's creatures gallop across your chest on PolymerClayDaily.com

Layered translucents

Lynn Yuhr pushes liquid polymer in translucent directions on PolymerClayDaily.com
Lynn Yuhr pushes liquid polymer in translucent directions on PolymerClayDaily.com

Florida’s Lynn Yuhr (the FlyingSquirrelStudio) explores liquid polymers. “What if?” is her guiding principle.

In this case, Lynn dotted, painted and stamped liquid polymer over thin translucent. She wanted the metal grid behind the veneer to show through so she used a light touch and kept the patterns sparse with plenty of translucent showing.

The piece at right is the start of the veneer.

You may have seen this 2019 video before, it’s Lynn in her early liquid polymer exploration. She’s on day 63 of her 100-day 2020 excursion

Jewelry from the garden

Marina Merkulova's gardening necklace on PolymerClayDaily.com

Down on your knees outdoors in your favorite jeans, you’re brought up close to the beauty of the weeds in the garden by this necklace that’s a collage of textures and shapes by Moscow’s Marina Merkulova.

Marina is part of one of those “no explanations”, “no words” challenges that asks artists to simply share their work on Facebook.

These soft rectangles and dark textures stack up in a way that’s relaxed and comforting.  That’s plenty good for a summer Tuesday.

Lovely to experience the soothing effects of a few weeds pressed into clay.

Polymer therapy

Mira Pinki Krispil used polymer to heal her hands on PolymerClayDaily.com

Mira Pinki Krispil surrounds her pieces with women and that feels comfortable for a Monday. The faces seem concerned and connected.

The polymer portraits have been cured on a 6 1/2″ marble vase. The other side of the vessel is covered with Mira’s bright millefiore flowers.

Some years ago she came to polymer after enduring eight surgeries on her hands. Working with clay was part of her occupational therapy and she used it to document her recovery. “Since then I can’t stop creating with this amazing material,” Mira admits.

Culture on a string

Ohio’s

Debbie Jackson explores black culture on a string on PolymerClayDaily

Debbie Jackson and I had a conversation today about recent events. We decided to lean into the discomfort of the issues that have been swirling around us to get some clarification and to be able to move ahead.

I knew I’d make some blunders (I did) and Debbie knew she wouldn’t have all the answers (she didn’t). But it was a start.

Debbie is exhausted and emotionally drained by recent events but she’s also hopeful that society can be repaired.

Come see how a black artist who has worked hard to make her living in polymer has plowed through a difficult landscape and succeeded. Debbie’s works are sold at the National Museum of African American History and Culture and she has taught and written, collaborated, and organized in amazing ways.

Her Miami University summer workshop (now postponed) is entitled “Culture on a String” and that says a lot about how Debbie envisions her polymer art.

Our StudioMojo interview was a start in my education and a necessary first step to better understanding and healing. 

Polymer with grit

Marisa Winston makes earrings for women with grit on PolymerClayDaily.com

These pale iridescent curls of textured polymer form earrings in the summer collection of North Carolina’s Marisa Winston.

Her shop named Ostrea means ‘oyster’ in Latin. “Everyone is familiar with the phrase ‘no grit, no pearl,’ but my experience has taught me how true this really is,” Marisa says.

The name is a reminder of the power we have to transform life’s grit into resilience, inner beauty, and strength. Her earrings are made for “women with grit.”

Experience the soft ocean colors and curvy sea shapes on her website.

About face

Sacra Argilla was determined to get this face right on PolymerClayDaily.com

Even more than the size of this face cane from Warsaw’s Sacra Argilla, the dramatic dark pose, and dense background draw us in.

Sacra adds layer upon layer of slim lengths of clay around the portrait. At the smallest size, the background still vibrates with color.

The project took over 135 hours and she documents her process on YouTube and Instagram. This cane will last forever!

Sacra Argilla was determined to get this face right on PolymerClayDaily.com

This is Sacra’s second try at the project. Her first one in 2017 was a disaster. Imagine devoting that much time and energy to a single project! It must resonate deeply with her.

What project won’t leave you alone?

Blurring the lines with enamels

Nikolina Otrzan replicates enamel's blurry lines on PolymerClayDaily.com

Polymer artists have long tried to replicate the soft blurry edges that are the hallmark of copper enameled pieces.

Low fire (cold) enamel powders were rumored to be the answer but my vials of powders went to the back of a bottom drawer several years ago after some messy attempts.

Nikolina Otrzan replicates enamel's blurry lines on PolymerClayDaily.com

Croatia’s Nikolina Otrzan makes me want to dig out my powders and give it another go. Her tutorial shows me where I went wrong. She uses liquid polymer, layers and other tricks to keep the powders under control.

Nikolina has lots more patience than I do. She loads up her instructions with photos and steps. I pare them down for my experiments to see how they fit my style.

Imitative enamels may be the next big thing. If this rings your chimes, now’s the time to explore.

Love beads

Aow Dusdee's psychedelic beads take us back on PolymerClayDaily.com

Thailand’s Aow Dusdee makes beads that burst with the psychedelic colors of the early days of polymer. The shapes are updated and the tassels are trendy but Aow’s beaded pulls and dangles have an unmistakable 60’s hippie vibe.

They harken back to days of youthful protests of another era and give us hope that today’s passion and energy will become a breakthrough moment for societal repair.

“Smile on my face. Love in my heart. Peace in my mind. Color in my life. Creativity in my soul. Wanna share it with the world,” says her tagline. Her Facebook will put you in the Wayback Machine.

Friday piranhas

Estelle Marchal brings her inner pirhanas to life on PolymerClayDaily.com

This school of piranhas by France’s Estelle Marchal (lesPtitsmobiles) may not look very dangerous but they have a mouthful of scalpels.

It’s easy to understand mouthfuls of vitriol today (even though Estelle makes her fish look rather benign). See how she turns them into mobiles, schools of sea characters that float through the air with eyes that glow in the dark. Watch Estelle bring these characters to life.

Need to bring your creative side back to life? Head on over to StudioMojo for a look at the ideas that our wild times have hatched.

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