Earrings for birders

Are there bee-eaters on your worktable? from PolymerClayDaily.com

Australia’s Bron (bombalabee) knows her birds. These are rainbow bee-eaters. Other species fly in and out of her shop – pin robins, black cockatoos, rosellas, macaws, parrots, magpies, and more.

Bron layers on polymer feathers with a birder’s eye for detail, shapes, and colors. Her website is launching this month. Welcome her.

What’s on your feeder?

A swingy collage

Pickled Ginger makes swingy drops from layers of happy shapes on PolymerClayDaily.com
Pickled Ginger makes swingy drops from layers of happy shapes on PolymerClayDaily.com

A scroll through Pickled Ginger Jewellery’s Instagram will get you in the right frame of mind for a glorious weekend.

Her colors are zingy and her patterns are a happy swingy collaged jumble that yells joyfully, “Look at me!”

She’s in Australia but her vibe travels fast.


If you want even more cheery and thought-provoking delights, pop on over to StudioMojo. It brings a carefully curated selection of the finest works and brightest ideas of the week to your inbox every Saturday morning.

On and off polymer

Sherstin Schwartz gardens in the dark on PolymerClayDaily.com

Minnesota’s Sherstin Schwartz (lifeofapaintbrush) turns polymer on and off.

I’ve always been fascinated by glow-in-the-dark clays and paints but have I ever tried them? No. Have you?

There she goes again, getting us all psyched with her alien flowers and otherworldly gardens. Her paints and powders are from Technoglow.

Miss Strange

Dotted hills pull you into Minneapolis Chris Baird’s (BairdPlayWorks) latest fantasy wall piece about Miss Strange and her open bag as she journeys up through the hills.

The caption reads, “Dear Miss Strange: Will you come up here on the sixth of September and stay until the sixteenth? It would give us all the greatest pleasure.” 

Chris is returning to a style she used to create in wood and trying it in polymer.

FOLLOW FRIDAY: Seven and Seven

Follow Ellen Marshall and 13 other artists deepening their understanding of racism on PolymerClayDaily.com

Keep an eye on Ellen Marshall whose angular, lustrous work is being featured this week on The Gathering7and7 on Instagram and here on Facebook.

Ellen is one of seven black and seven white artists who formed a group dedicated to courageous conversations about racism in the polymer clay community and beyond.

We’ve been meeting online for a year and a half to discover our commonalities and our differences. It’s been a fascinating and sometimes uncomfortable exploration.

Truth Be Told, an exhibit of the members’ works will open in October. Follow us as we work our way forward.


We’ve got a yummy, wide-ranging lineup of artists in this week’s StudioMojo. New works will dazzle you and we’ve unearthed a tutorial that will wow.

Pop on over and have a look-see.

Pouring your heart into polymer

Sally Kirk keeps her father's heart beating in polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Houston’s Sally Kirk (BlossomandClay) pours her heart into jewelry for herself that honors her late father.

Her father’s EKG from 1989 provides the graphic for transfer to the earrings and pendant she wore to receive her master’s degree in August…a year to the day after her father’s death.

She memorialized the day with jewelry that she’ll always treasure and wear knowing that he’s proud of her.

Polymer music

Kansas City’s Heidi McCullough (BlueHeron) wrote and performed the theme song for last weekend’s Polymer Art Summit. I believe that’s a first. It’s sung to the tune of “My Favorite Things”.

It ends with the honest refrain, “I simply remember my giant clay stash, and then I don’t feel so bad!” Thanks to Heidi and to the PAS organizers. (click for a bigger image)

Heidi McCullough penned new lyrics to her favorite things on PolymerClayDaily.com

FOLLOW FRIDAY: Susan Crocenzi

Susan Crocenzi mixes glass and polymer in large lively mosaics on PolymerClayDaily.com

Weary of earrings? Done with slabs? Nothing better than a scroll through Susan Crocenzi’s mosaics for a breath of fresh air.

Look closely, she combines glass and polymer in ways that make it hard to tell what’s what in the riot of color. And her pieces are big and bold. They will lift your mood if you’re feeling timid and uncertain.


Feeling lazy and unproductive? Good! And when you’re looking at the clouds and swaying the hammock, you’ll be surprised at the ideas that pop up.

Join us over at StudioMojo for a Saturday morning dose of surprise and delight. 

Polymer copying

Copying with a happy ending from Lindly Haunani and Samunnat on PolymerClayDaily

Stories about copying often get ugly and contentious but not this one. This copying/sharing story is about generosity and hope.

Years ago Lindly Haunani gave the women of Samunnat Nepal permission to produce a few of her necklaces. Enough to purchase a storage cabinet that they needed.

Lindly’s petal designs contain echoes of her Hawaiian heritage. The bright flowers also resonated with Nepali culture.

The women so loved making the lei from Lindly and Maggie’s Color Inspiration book that it became a staple of their collection with Lindly’s blessing.

Lindly’s leis became Samunnat’s malas (modeled here by Sanjana) and the women’s project continues to flourish,

Wendy Moore’s post explains the story on their new website. Sign up for their newsletter for a chance to win one of the women’s latest necklaces.


Copying with a happy ending from Lindly Haunani and Samunnat on PolymerClayDaily

Scroll to the bottom of the first page on their new site and sign up at “keep in touch”

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