Unbroken circle of friends

Keeping in touch Kentucky style on PolymerClayDaily.com

I like the bags of “inchies” swapped and then squirreled away in ziplocks in the back of the bottom drawer. They make me nostalgic and bring a smile. But much better to do what the Kentucky group did this year and create arty trinkets that you can wear or drape from shelves.

Swappers received short lengths of ball chain onto which they add their beads. Members amassed their trades and snapped the lengths together. One look and longtime friends know whose work is whose.

It’s a way of touching base, waving hello, saying something comforting or sassy or silly.

We’re still here and with any luck, we’ll be together again.

Joan Tayler shared this swap idea some years back. The Kentucky guild whose members are sprawled across the midwest decided to use it in a year when this is this is the closest we can get. Ron Lehocky heads up the group while Mary Clyde Sparks and Francie Owens (and others I’m sure) made it all work.

 

Kristen Oxtoby updates the 60’s aesthetic

Kristen Oxtoby's earrings have a 60's-inspired aesthetic with a 90's soundtrack on PolymerClayDaily.com

Many of Kristen Oxtoby’s designs (These Hollow Hills) rely on extruded clay laid down together to make corrugated shapes. Here, ball chain dangles from the bottom of her Farrah earrings. And in her Circa series, the polymer strings wind around circle cutouts.

Kristen Oxtoby's earrings have a 60's-inspired aesthetic with a 90's soundtrack on PolymerClayDaily.com

Kristen’s pieces are big and bold. She calls it “…a ’60s-inspired aesthetic with a 90’s soundtrack.”

This North Carolina artist makes collections that have attitude. Get the full effect on her Instagram.

Swapping with style

Joan Tayler's ball chain idea makes swapping fun again on PolymerClayDaily

Ohio neighbor, Nancy Nearing, traveled to Vancouver to visit her daughter and to meet up with Joan Tayler who has a thriving polymer business at the Granville Island Public Market (and on Etsy).

Joan sent PCD readers a super new idea for small art to trade and collect.  If inchies and totems and bowls have lost their swap thrill in your group, consider her new method.

She recommends baking beads directly on short lengths of ball chain (1 1/2″ or so). Sandwich the chain between two slices of cane or devise your own style.  Join the individual pieces together with connectors and make them into necklaces, bracelets, keychains, whatever.

Joan made all these beads on this sample. Beads coming from far and wide might look very different.

Once your group agrees on a color and size of ball chain, you have an easy swap. Brilliant, eh? Thanks, Joan and Nancy!

StudioMojo heads west! Travel along and see who we run into. Join us!

 

 

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