Playing with bright bits

Germany's Eliska Koliosova plays with shapes and bits of pattern on PolymerClayDaily.com

The way Germany’s Eliska Koliosova (fimeli) experiments with tube beads and plays with extruded patterns makes me want to know more about her and her work.

She’s quite elusive on her Flickr pages that contain mostly dreamy photographs with polymer experiments sprinkled in. Look at how she plays with shapes and scrappy bits in this necklace.

My interest in finding meaning in beads made from scraps has taken me to strange and interesting areas. I’ll be taking the month of November off to explore this phenomenon and write about it. No PCD for a month! 

Germany's Eliska Koliosova plays with shapes and bits of pattern on PolymerClayDaily.com

Writing daily is such a habit that taking a break scares me. This week and then some time off. It will be good for our relationship, right?

Waffled beads

Vera Thom Kleist makes a waffle weave for fall on PolymerClayDaily.com

Germany’s Vera Kleist Thom twirls extruded strings around a ball of clay and carves (or maybe she just textures) the surfaces so that they look woven. The result is a necklace with a thermal waffle weave accentuated by its muted winter colors.

Vera has perfected her woven methods and I’m only guessing about how she makes it happen. Go to her Flickr page to study how she applies similar strategies to vessels, disks, and other beads.

As the season changes, Vera shows us how to shift our palettes and our wardrobes.

Inclusions add a cosmic touch

Marina Rios mixes lots of ingredients into her cosmic rocks on PolymerClayDaily.com

Chicago’s Marina Rios (FancifulDevices) creates rustic, Victorian, tribal style mixed media assemblages. Her antique and vintage materials are heavily altered and combined with artisan components to create evocative objects.

Marina adds sand, ground and dyed oyster shell, embossing powders, pre-baked and chopped polymer and more as inclusions in the beads that stack up into this Regolith totem.

After firing, she begins painting –  back-painting, resist, dry brushing, glazing and more to give this 3.4″ stack of beads its history and mystery.

If you like it when cosmic collides with tribal in polymer, check her out on Instagram and Etsy.

Changing colors

Leslie Aja eases us into fall with Toops-inspired beads on PolymerClayDaily

These beads from California’s Leslie Aja ease us back to fall. Leslie was inspired by early beads created by Cynthia Toops.

On Leslie’s Instagram, she features several groupings of simple beads in striking colors. Their simplicity and strong colors strike just the right note as the season begins to change.

Need more? Come on over to StudioMojo this weekend where we’ll finish our wrapup of fall events and look at what products and ideas are on the horizon. 

Beads to fondle

Doreen Gay Kassel creates a potpourri of beads to fondle on PolymerClayDaily

Since my network is taunting me with an intermittent signal, we’ll lean on New York’s Doreen Gay Kassel for a post that requires few words and a quick upload.

Just look at those beads! The colors and textures beg us to fondle them. You can look more closely on Instagram.

Wifi repairman has been called! I had to walk over to my studio to post. They have a fiber connection that has spoiled me.  

Summer palette

Anna Nel's colors take you to the beach on PolymerClayDaily.com

If you’re looking for sunshine and summer colors, head on over to Anna Nel’s site.

Anna Nels grasshopper bodies on PolymerClayDaily.com

This beachy combination of layered luminous beads on a necklace wire has become the header on her Facebook.

On Instagram, you can see a whole range of her work and let the colors wash over you.

Anna’s working on some grasshoppers and the canes at right will make stunning bodies.

Zentangle to polymer

Anita Long brings her zentangles to polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

It was a logical progression for illustrator and Zentangle enthusiast Anita Long (neeneeree) from Indiana to translate her drawings into polymer canes. The detail and dimension in this cane have given her enough material to last through the end of her 100 Day project. You can follow along on her Facebook and Instagram.

Anita Long brings her zentangles to polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

In the last few days of the project, she’s had a burst of energy and playing with layering translucent clay, alcohol inks, silver leaf, embossing powder, and acrylic paint. Her stunning progress may make you want to consider joining in the next 100 Day creative marathon.

Interlocking polymer

Izabela Nowak plays the polymer slots on PolymerClayDaily.com

Berlin’s Izabela Nowak’s new line of Slice Up jewelry takes us back to interlocking paper constructions of childhood. These round beads are assembled from flat disks so they must be put together after baking.

She continues with other treatments, playing with shapes and colors that reveal different colors and patterns on each surface.

Look at Izabela’s growing collection of color-shifting beads on Flickr.

Did PCD miss a day? Why yes we did. Let’s say it was in celebration of summer and in an attempt to clear my desk before leaving for family time out west. StudioMojo is fresh and ready for your Saturday enjoyment but that Thursday post slipped right by me. It happens. If you feel you’re missing out, join us!

In a NY-minute from Moscow

Galka Vasina reveals her graphic tricks in a NY minute on PolymerClayDaily

This superfast video from Moscow’s Galka-Vasina starts the day with a most welcome kick in the pants!

I had admired how foggy and amorphous her graphic-patterned terra cotta beads looked. One glance at the video and you’ll be smacking your forehead like I did. Nuff said!

Looks like they’re soon doing a live online event about these methods if you care to figure out the time change.

When simple is soothing

Juliya Laukhina extrudes and wraps beads from a spring palette on PolymerClayDaily

Today we examine close shades of extruded ribbons of green polymer wrapped around ultralight core beads.

Again easy and effective techniques that rely on color and repetition. No overworking or overthinking. Leaching or cooling the clay accentuates the ragged edges of the flattened extruded strings.

These spring beads are from Moscow’s Juliya Laukhina and you’ll find more of her delicate, natural way with color on her Instagram and Etsy sites. (The beads are already on their way to a customer in Connecticut.)

Sometimes we make our creations more complex than they need to be when simple can be so effective.

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