Polymer panache

Zazu does a simple cane with style on PolymerClayDaily.com
Zazu does a simple cane with style on PolymerClayDaily.com

Spain’s ZaZu shares her basic cane in a 15-second tutorial that’s hard to resist.

Zazu does a simple cane with style on PolymerClayDaily.com

Her design looks like stitching and she turns it into all sorts of trendy geometrically shaped earrings and pendants in a wide variety of colors.

While the designs aren’t complex, they’re rich with panache and style. Here’s ZaZu on Facebook.

Going cuckoo

Gael Keyes goes a little cuckoo with outrageous birds on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Mexico’s Gael Keyes (@keyesgael) focused on bugs at last year’s Clayathon. This year she’s added outrageous fish and birds to her repertoire of wildlife.

Gael Keyes goes a little cuckoo with outrageous birds on PolymerClayDaily.com

Gael developed her own cane style that she pattern-matches in the Natasha bead way (here’s a quick tutorial) to create feathers, fins, and wings.

During the holidays she turns to her own brands of angels that you can see on Facebook.

Alluring or menacing

We recoil but can't dismiss the beauty of this brooch from Anna Nel on PolymerClayDaily.com

Your reflexes may make you flinch but the colors will make you look twice at this brooch from Poland’s Anna Nel.

The snake is covered with slices of a mosaic-like cane in stunning blues, rusts, gold, and white. Its head is covered with a slice that’s matched in a Natasha bead style.

It’s menacing in the most beautifully alluring way.

Bullseye hits the spot

Kate Lee Foley's bullseye earrings hit the spot on PolymerClayDaily.com

Some days, the trusty bullseye cane really hits the spot. Take these earrings from Australia’s Kate Lee Foley.

Nothing pretentious or complicated about these swingy cutouts. The yellow background picks up one of the cane colors. Kate calls her earrings “…a little Gustave Klimt.”

Stuck for an idea? Try a bullseye.

A closer look

Pilar Rodríguez Domínguez makes us look closely at her skillfully blended canes on PolymerClayDaily

Let’s close a sunny week with a sunny brooch from Canary Islands’ Pilar Rodríguez Domínguez (Amatista). I snagged this from her Instagram a little while ago and kept returning for another look.

That’s a sure sign that there’s something interesting going on. The canes (available on Etsy) have a stained-glass quality about them. There’s a sensual, sinewy feel too.

It takes a moment for all the blends and colors to register. It must be the fine dark line between elements that makes these bright colors read so well.

Figuring out what makes a piece of art grab us is part of what we’ll be looking at over at StudioMojo this weekend. You’d be surprised what you can learn by taking the time for a closer look. Join us.

A bird in the hand

Edith Fischer Katz finds a crow in her clay on PolymerClayDaily.com

Israel’s Edith Fischer Katz’ crow cane started at about 6″ in diameter. On Instagram, you can follow her as she builds the crow and then surrounds it with shadow and background.

She fearlessly reduces the plate-size cane. Edith cut a thick slice at about this size and sculpted a 3D crow out of the slice.

Edith Fischer Katz finds a crow in her clay on PolymerClayDaily.com

What will she do with her murder of crows? (Yes, it’s a murder of crows.) We’ll have to follow her Instagram to see where this goes.

Edith usually sculpts in clay as you can see in her Facebook photos of small figures. This cane is an interesting departure.

Monika Busch stacks punchy colors on big hole beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

Germany’s Monika Busch (Efmoni) tells us that, ” I like to be inspired by artists like Mucha, Hundertwasser, Monet, and Klimt. The luminosity of colors and strong contrasts fascinate me.”

But you already sensed that, right?

Monika Busch stacks punchy colors on big hole beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

Monika makes big hole beads and buttons, many of them a variation on the Bettina Welker cane into which Monika injects great colors that wake up your Monday.

Underground rainbows

Gilly Scott turns a rainbow cane into budding beads on PolymerClayDaily

Australia’s Gilly Scott (clayladydownunder) makes us think spring is possible with this rainbow bud.

The winter wind is still howling but we all trust that there are fantastic forces like these pushing up to the garden surface.

I hunted for precise instructions on this cane and they are easy to find. Getting the colors clean and clear is trickier. Perhaps Gilly will share pictures of her method.

If you need a spring boost, try one of these rainbows to lift your spirits.

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