Try, try again

Marie Segal's small Christmas tree and a free tutorial on PolymerClayDaily.com

Marie Segal uses the tiniest bits of Cernit to create her pudgy Christmas tree.

Her most recent free small-scale experiments reel us in. Mix a small circle of pearl with a smidge of color and see what happens. No advanced 65-page detailed instructions to plow through.

Trying out her mokume gane mini-tutorial might just convince you to try something new…or not.

Truth is, I’ve never mastered the technique. Maybe I should try again.

Did you know that Marie Segal is credited with first using a pasta machine in 1983 to flatten polymer? She knows a thing or two!

Halloween scream and pats on the back

Karen Walker lets out a scream for Halloween on PolymerClayDaily.com

UK’s Karen Walker (Clayground) perfectly captures Halloween 2020 with her rendition of Edvard Munch’s Scream in Cernit. No gore necessary! We get the picture from this sleek, simple, wide-eyed character. Here on Facebook.

If you’re feeling ready for a cheery diversion, stop by tomorrow’s StudioMojo where we’ll be encouraging you to pat yourselves on the back for accomplishments great and small during these scream-worthy times. BYO Halloween candy. 

The allure of layered translucent clays

Lisa Gauthier looks into translucent possibilities on PolymerClayDaily

These samples come from Connecticut’s Lisa Gauthier, a student in Marie Segal’s Cernit Translucent 2017 class. Glass-like layers that reveal more color below remind us of the possibilities of the clay and may make you want to try your hand at it.

The flower and butterfly cane slices appliqued on came from another student, Seana Bettencourt.

Study these and other samples from Lisa on Facebook. “Thanks to Marie Segal and Cernit I can create colorful, bright things in these cold dark winter days,” says Lisa.

Wrong side out is right

Miranda on PCDaily

Argentina’s Flavia Miranda puts flat cane slices (Cernit) together in an unusual way. As you fly through photos on the web, sometimes a simple, carefree piece stops your eye.

It’s her playful, unselfconscious construction that intrigues. Isn’t that wrong side out? Why is the thread showing? The disks overlap and bunch.

As you can see on Flavia’s Facebook pages here and here, bunching the beads and integrating the stringing materials are all part of her vibe. How great she looks wearing a similar piece in her profile picture.

When your eye yells Whoa!, it pays to stop and investigate.

 

 

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