Home sweet polymer home

Black on PolymerClayDaily.com

Nashville’s Lindsay Black (oddlyandcompany) creates home portraits in polymer. “Home is the memories we make on the inside. The outside is a symbol of those memories,” she explains.

In her miniature versions, the grass is mowed, the flowers are blooming and all is right with the world which is a comforting thought.

You can walk through her tiny custom scenes on Instagram, Facebook, and Etsy.

Does this make you want to create your own real estate?

Focal clasps

Nelsen on PolymerClayDaily.com

Betty Nelsen’s focal beads have a catch. She nestles and overlaps and builds designs that join magnetically. The focal bead is also the clasp in this Davis, California artist’s latest line. “My aim is to create jewelry that is playful, eccentric and a bit daring,” she says.

Betty is a longtime artist/educator/painter who’s been working with polymer for a few years. Her online exposure at this point is on Facebook  and her site where her collection of designs provides a boost of inspiration to begin your week.

The link to Betty comes from Tory Hughes.

Put your heart in it

Fuchs Galchen on PolymerClayDaily.com

Time flies and it’s time to start making hearts. No need to stick with traditional reds, however.

Israel’s Orly Fuchs Galchen (Hollowology) shows us her best blues and greens dressed up with carved dots and lines. She shares hollow heart tricks in a tutorial on Etsy.

A look at Orly’s unconventional approaches shown on Instagram and Facebook will have you skipping to your studio to try your hand at some romantic mementos of your own.

Colors for a vintage year

Wiggins on PolymerClayDaily.com

What you’re looking at is Virginia artist Angie Wiggins’ wrapped and stacked polymer palette for 2017. Each year Angie starts by choosing her colors and mixing a big batch.

“I cleaned out my half of our tiny crawl space attic and found a piece of fabric from drapes that my mom had made back in the 1950s. It had sat in the sewing room/spare bedroom for six months before it dawned on me to start researching the colors of the mid-century,” she explains in her blog post.

Angie has spent weeks mixing her vintage palette and now she’s ready to launch into her art.

Her methodical, focused yet serendipitous approach is something many artists aspire to but few achieve. Even the way she neatly wraps and stores her stash is impressive. It looks like a box of chocolates!

You can see Angie’s mixed media bowls and polymer pretties on her blog, Facebook and Instagram. Her Pinterest boards lead you through her process even further.

Inspired mosaic

Boucher on Polymerclaydaily.com

The rich textures in the polymer mosaic work of Darwin, Australia’s Nicole Boucher (BlueMallee) reflect her tropical surroundings.

This particular oriental-inspired piece was snatched up by a customer who then sent Nicole a photo of its new home. It landed where it belonged!

Another photo of the mosaic here shows off its dark jewel colors with lustrous gold highlights. Over 90 tiles surround what looks like a slab of ancient text.

Scroll through Nicole’s Facebook to view some of her other mosaics and jewelry.

Polymer hats

Blackford, Terlizzi and Friesen on PCDaily

Pink polymer everywhere! Artists hopped on the craze for this symbol of women’s marches around the globe.

These brooches were made by Leslie Blackford (Instagram), Melissa Terlizzi (Flickr), and Christi Friesen (Instagram).

I can vouch for the vibe at the Washington, DC site which was very friendly and upbeat (more in StudioMojo which will come out Tuesday). Many polymer artists joined in marches and cleverly added their wearable reminders that women are united and strong.

Does this inspire you to make your own version?

Marching as one in polymer

Rachelle from our polymer classes at the Ohio Reformatory for Women made the We March Together pins for Jackie Burns and me.

Faces were the subject of last month’s class and Rachelle has been making face canes ever since. Mine is has orange/blonde streaked hair and Jackie’s hair is white.

Thornton on PolymerClayDaily.com

Their brooches certainly remind us that we march together in support of all women’s issues.

Then Pennsylvania’s Andrew Thornton put a pink hat on his baby dragon to show his support for the marchers. He explains the details of his process on his blog. Off to march with a wild cast of characters.

Lighthearted polymer

Corbitt on PolymerClayDaily.com

Dayna Corbitt (WhimsyCalling) perks us up with a lighthearted beginning to the season. “You hold the key to my heart…” says the accompanying love poem that you can read on Instagram.  Her so simple approach doesn’t rely on red clay and fancy designs. It’s pure romance and love.

She’s cleared the shelves on her Etsy store in preparation for romantics who want something that goes right to the heart of Valentines Day.

Between our eyes

Dittmar on PCDaily

Portland polymer artist Meredith Dittmar has appeared on PCD many times, initially for her small sculptures, now grown into the show, Between Our Eyes, at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco from January 20 to March 3.

 

The gallery describes Meredith’s work as human-animal-plant-energy relief-like amalgams that contain threads of common elements and colors to express deep levels of union across themes of biology, technology, and consciousness. The characters are frequently involved in quiet expressive moments, or lounge facing an audience, sharing their inner space. Dittmar believes it is this space we recognize in ourselves, and through convening in that space, the interconnectedness of all things is revealed.

The gallery’s exhibits are edgy and modern and Meredith’s paper/polymer works are dynamic. If you’re not quite sure about the fantasy/technology/biology scenes that you’re looking at on Meredith’s Instagram, Facebook and Flickr, relax and enjoy the mix of paper and polymer, shapes and color on these large works. Let them hit you between the eyes.

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