FRIDAY FOLLOW: Skinny Dip

Today we skinny dip with Ohio’s Morgan McGoff (skinny.dip.jewelry).

She’s grown up swimming comfortably in an ocean of technology. “The skinny” refers to remaining true to her naked, authentic self. Her studio is smack dab in the middle of her living room.

Morgan has an art and photography background. She started with polymer in 2018 gathering twelve thousand followers along the way as well as a Patreon following.

She makes sleek, monochromatic jewelry with clever twists and tweaks. She sells!

She finds her community online. Morgan is today’s polymer artist.


We’ll look at other au courant polymer artists in this Saturday’s StudioMojo. Did you know that Etsy doubled its revenue in 2020?

What do the numbers mean to you? Join us and hang on as we sort it out.

 

Studio in a go-bag

Sarah Shriver's distinctive colors shine through her new style on PolymerClayDaily.com

California’s Sarah Shriver sounds tentative when she talks about her new collection of painted circle necklaces. She’s been a polymer artist for decades and this minimalist style is a departure. One admirer said the circles reminded her of tiddlywinks, the kids’ game.

Sarah’s complex cane work and signature color palette have been distinctive. But the past year and now fear of wildfire have shifted her thinking. She has to be able to move at a moment’s notice. She’s pared down.

These circles painted with layers of Genesis and strung on silk thread contain Sarah’s same rich and luscious colors but with a nod to efficiency and minimalism.

She’s also been refining mobiles and hollow translucent beads and more. Her new directions reflect the smart, adaptive strategy that our times require.

Polymer evolution/revolution from India

Radhika Sadhika sketches in polymer and wire on PolymerClayDaily.com

India’s Radhika Sadhika (radicalsbyradhikasadhika) illustrates the flow of line transforming into shapes that are aesthetically different in every piece.

She combines clay and wire in ways that make them look like sketches. Brass wires connect clay designs and turn them into minimalist wearable line drawings.

You’ll only find a cryptic bit about Radhika on Instagram. You have to DM her for sales information on her intriguing pieces. Her links lead you to a Google Photo gallery of her work. The path to her works mirrors the Evolution/Revolution theme of her work.

Read about her on Arts Thread.

Essential hearts

Fi-mons strips hearts to their essentials on PolymerClayDaily.com

You’ll have to fill me in on the name behind Spain’s Bisuteria Creativa (fi-mons). All I know is that Valentine’s Day is approaching and her slightly wonky hearts speak love to me. You too?

Her simple circles are delightful. Everything is stripped down to its essentials. Pure, simple and totally trendy.

Track her around on Facebook, Instagram, and Flickr. Can you find her name?

Polymer in Japan

Yukari Tateuchi offers a taste of Japanese polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Japan’s Yukari Tateuchi (ycollection) was introduced to polymer in 1995. That was about the time when Nan Roche and Kaz Kono were busy in Japan though there may be no connection. I like to think that’s when polymer seeds were planted. 

On her class page, she notes that, “It is even better if you bring your own slippers. The workplace is small and dirty,” There are interesting stories here!

These disks covered with monochromatic canes have a soothing, minimalist and modern feel about them. Go explore her aesthetic on her pages.

Share your favorites with PCD

Small landscapes from Siberia's Yuliya Zharova on PolymerClayDaily.com

The simple and striking pendants by Siberia’s Yuliya Zharova (WildOnionArt) show knowledge of stark winter and spring scenes. It’s challenging to effectively show so much with a limited palette and in the small spaces that pendants and earrings allow.

Yuliya was brought to your attention by Missouri’s Heidi McCullough who creates simple wildlife ornaments of her own. When an artist strikes a chord with you, it’s great to share them with PCD. Thanks, Heidi.

Drama and closure

Fiona Herbst combines utility and drama on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ireland’s Fiona Herbst combines utility and drama with a simple closure. The dotted and bead fits perfectly. Maybe Fiona will tell us how she keeps the bead from pulling through.

The look is very modern. See the rest of her line of trendy pieces on Facebook and Instagram.

Stacked squares

Cajhen on PolymerClayDaily.com

Slovenia’s Marjana Cajhen shows how minimalist designs that aren’t technique-driven can delight us with openness and wearability. Thin graduated flat squares of polymer veneer are stacked on each other separated by tiny spacers.

If Marjana’s sensibilities mesh with yours, look at more of her work on Pinterest, FB, and her blog.

PCD is closing in on 3,000 posts and 300 weekly weekend StudioMojos. That shocking number paralyzed me temporarily on Friday and I took the day off to recover.This link from Lindly Haunani jarred me back into action.