Trickster polymer

Leila Bidler celebrates in stone with a touch of tribal #polymerclaydaily

We might as well stretch this holiday weekend for one more day with Leila Bidler’s Kokopelli, the Native American trickster god. Leila’s carved imitative stone gives New Year’s a touch of tribal. The how-to pictures on her Instagram show her methods.

Party’s over. It’s time to get busy again but no reason you can’t slip a memento like this in your pocket to remind you of what good times you intend for the year.

Button vignettes

These buttons from Vancouver’s Joan Tayler take polymer pebbles to a whole new level. On each of them one red ladybug crawls across a domed faux granite base that’s been partially obscured by slices of leaves and flowers. Picture a thickly knitted wool cardigan finished with these bright scenes.

Leaves and ladybugs were Joan’s theme for the previous week. And her individually sculpted old owl buttons from week 29 will make you smile. She has an eye for woodland vignettes that delight. You can track the week-by-week progress on her button project here.

Sedona stones

Tinapple Sedona stones bracelet

My Sedona stones polymer bracelet is part of a continuing fascination with rocks, this time with flat shapes and western red rock colors. My petroglyphs, based on the ones we saw at nearby ruins, aren’t quite ready for display.

You’ll understand my obsession better when you look at the pictures from our hikes through the local canyons and along the rivers. Sedona is a rock lover’s paradise. Allowing your surroundings to influence your art is an immersive experience.

I was pleased to see the works of Barb Fajardo, Tish Collins and Gwen Pena in one gallery in town. Three in one gallery! Excellent!

Cavender emerges with moss

Cavender's moss-covered sticks and pods

Kim Cavender has emerged from hibernation covered in moss! After several months of quiet, she’s added some new work that includes faux moss clinging to her polymer sticks and stones.

Cavender's polymer rocks 2010

My polymer pebble mentor, Kim has expanded her forest finds to include nuts, vines and pods that she’ll be teaching at the Ohio retreat this weekend. (Let’s hope the snow stops.)

Kim’s rocks are beauties. Take a look at her new ones.

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