FRIDAY FOLLOW – Blossom and Clay

Follow Sally Kirk to see what she'll try next on PolymerClayDaily.com

Houston’s Sally Kirk (BlossomandClay) has whizzed through polymer techniques in her first year. She brings a keen eye and a steady hand to each method.

Here Sally tops alcohol inks on polymer with resin. She has a love/hate relationship with the inks that can mix brilliantly or badly without warning.

Follow her to see how this musician/teacher/gardener lets her skills and sensitivities play in polymer.

Radical polymer

Sayra Lopez shows rebelliousness in her art on PolymerClayDaily.com

Switzerland’s Sayra Lopez (NinkaPop) takes the minimalist vibe that’s everywhere and turns it into Radical Fashion that stands out.

“It’s about being brave, standing up for what you believe in, and standing up for you,” she says. It’s for the rebellious ones, the misfits, the ones who make their own rules.

NinkaPop’s designs often mix media. Here they sandwich resin between high voltage color polymer. Their collections also include smooth clear shapes in acrylic. Experience their approach on Instagram.

Piles of possibilities

Laura Walthen designs pieces from this pile of possibilities on PolymerClayDaily.com

Savor the soft pastel shades in this pile of parts and pieces from UK’s Laura Wathen (ClaytimeDesigns).

The advantage of making a big batch of polymer shapes from a set palette is that the possibilities for building jewelry pieces are gloriously endless.

Laura coats each piece with resin before she starts her assemblage.

Don’t you want to scoop some up in your hands and let them rain down?

Klimt rubs off on polymer

Leanne Fergus updates Klimt with polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Australia’s Leanne Fergus brings a bit of inspiration from Gustav Klimt to polymer. She updates Klimt with a hint of circuit board imagery.

This square golden brooch sold quickly after she posted it on Instagram. She hadn’t even added the resin coat before it was snatched up.

The geometric textures are accented with dabs of jewel tone colors. Take in all the sparkle and movement captured under a glass-like layer of resin.

Sleek spare looks

Girodon on PolymerClayDaily.com

One more look at the sleek, scratched, sgraffito pieces that take an engineered, minimalist turn. They give us our last bit of winter’s gray and they’re both from France.

Sonya Girodon’s flat resin Wildfang bangle is embedded with horsehair and accented with two slotted polymer beads that slide on adding more shapes and a touch of bright yellow.

The horsehair looks like scratches floating in the clear resin. If you look at her Flickr page you’ll see how productive the winter has been for Sonya. 

Charuau on PolymerClayDaily.com

Céline Charuau’s (grisbleu) faceted and scratched gray dangles are complemented by white beads wired securely to the larger surfaces. Look more closely on Flickr.

These designs have power in their sparseness and prepare us for spring’s exuberance.

 

Mixing media

Lewis on PCDaily

Polymer slices baked right on frosted resin beads. What a great idea from California’s Karen Lewis (Klew). She embellishes glass beads using the same technique.

This layered look is Klew’s trademark. See more of her on Etsy and on Facebook.

There’s a free how-to video about her sculpted accent beads on her site for your weekend enjoyment. And here’s a self-care snippet from Klew (with Sarah Shriver) from a few years back.

The IPCA crew is flying into my home town for the retreat and Klew is among them. This is the first time Ohio has hosted such a big time event! News from the retreat coming your way next week. Have a big time this weekend.

Polymer growths

Rupprecht on PCDaily

These organic dot earrings and brooches from Kerstin Rupprecht are intriguing. Surely they are polymer and the shine could be resin or liquid polymer.

Rupprecht on PCDaily

I’ve spent too much time trying to figure out how she did this so I’ll leave it to you. What do you think? There aren’t too many clues on Flickr. Her fashionable and mysterious creations look like cells or growths. Very hip and mysterious.

Polymer confetti

Foss on PCDaily.com

There’s a bit of leftover New Year’s celebration in these flashy polymer pieces from Connecticut’s Kristie Foss. Glitter flakes and micro marbles are suspended in resin layered over Skinner blends. She captures the party confetti in mid-air.

In another recent post, Kristie shows off her imitation opal which she achieves with a slurry of iridescent flakes, alcohol inks and translucent liquid polymer over metal leaf on polymer.

Prowl through Kristie’s site to give your Monday a boost of inspiration. The link came to PCD from Katie Oskin.

Polymer bowls and tiles

It’s been a while since we’ve visited polymer bowl (and tile) maker Emily Squires Levine from Philadelphia.

Emily’s bowls usually include a thread of solid color among the cane slices to lead your eye along and to give the pieces a touch of whimsy. This 11″ tall pot includes a shock of grass along its rim.

Emily has also developed a way of arranging cane slices on a flat square and then coating the assemblage with resin to create accent tiles that can be used in kitchens.

These 3D accents with their smooth rounded edges beg to be examined closely. Oh, and don’t miss her egg collection.

Jeannie Havel (pcPolyzine) decided she needed to toot Emily’s horn and sent in the link. Thanks! Remember to find a deck of cards and measure some clay this weekend.