Traveling scrap

Anderson/Lehocky on PCDaily

Scrap from Jon Anderson’s studio in Bali made its way to Ron Lehocky’s workroom in Louisville.

Through all sorts of serendipitous connections and with a great deal of fun and intrigue, Jon’s polymer scrap is raising hundreds of dollars for the Kids Project in Kentucky.

Lehocky on PCDaily

You can see pictures of more of Ron’s results by clicking on the image.

He nearly discarded Jon’s canes that had welded themselves together in transit. What are you doing with your scrap? Are you overlooking treasures?

There’s more to the story! Jon is sending another batch of what he calls polymer cheese (more securely packaged this time) when Barb Alexander’s tour arrives in Bali soon.

Tokens from scrap

Maunsell on PCDaily

Jewel-like scrap hearts from Quebec’s Claire Maunsell get us in the proper holiday mood. What mementos and love tokens will you make this week?

Claire says she’ll soon offer a tutorial about the way she uses her scrap to get the dramatic effects you see here.

Maunsell on PCDaily

In the meanwhile, you can learn about her methods of using Pan pastels, inks, paints and some unusual tools with translucent Pardo clay on her new Craftcast class.

Watch how she teases the clay into shape (she was a glass artist before polymer), and applies layers and layers of texture and color until she’s pleased with the effect.

I learned a new way to anchor the probe on the thermometer. It’s often the little tricks you learn in a class that come in most handy. See more of Claire on Flickr, her site, Facebook and in her online Zibbet and Etsy galleries.

 

Scrap habits

levine_coasters

While we’re focused on ways of working, I noticed that Emily Squires Levine accumulates her cane slices and in a designated scrap bowl and at the end of each studio session, she makes coasters from the day’s surplus.

levine_junk

Clay that isn’t used in the coaster collage is blended into backing to add thickness. What a good way to get rid of scraps regularly so that they don’t nag at you from an ugly  pile that clutters the studio.

See more of Emily’s studio here and on Flickr.

More scrap tweaks

Bonnay on PCDaily

Building on yesterday’s tutorial, we look at how France’s Anne-Sophie Bonnay tweaks her scrap stripes, gouging across them to create a woven pattern.

She enhances the effect by impressing the polymer with a fabric texture.

Bonnay on PCDaily

Anne-Sophie offers more items made from the scrap sheet on her web site.

She even uses the curly gouged out strings, pressing them onto a solid colored sheet to create an abstract pattern. Her imitation tiger’s eye pattern is another riff on this scrap stripe theme.

Rubiks scrap

Pinklily on PCDaily

I bet you have a pile of holiday scrap mounting up in your studio waiting to be turned into something wonderful. France’s Pinklily (Sandrine Arevalo Zamora) has just the new trick you need and her pictures are so complete that you won’t need any translation. She calls it the Rubik’s Cube Effect.

Pinklily on PCDaily

No fancy tools or solutions required. Assemble your most colorful scrap, some screening, netting, or needlework canvas (she uses “gardening mesh”), black clay and you’re set.

Maggie Maggio first pointed this out to me and I take that as a stamp of approval. Enjoy! Here’s Pinklily on Facebook.

Scrap clay or story scraps?

Layl McDill, the creator of the Silly Milly line of polymer clay canes, has found a very clever way to use all of those mountains of leftover trimmings and scrap.

She creates Story Scraps, wall sculptures which show animals and figures celebrating all aspects of life.  The title of each piece is the doorway into the story, but a closer look at the whimsical and intricate details in each work soon draws one in until it isn’t long before the viewer’s own imagination starts to fill in the gaps.

If you’ve tried to title your work, you know how much time it takes to find just the right title, but what a difference it makes, as does taking the time to add just a bit of story.

Consider Layl’s Reader on the Stairs which tells her story of rushing up the stairs toward a goal, only to find herself being wise enough to pause along the way to read a book.  And just why are those birds there?  And the towers … and …

Layl’s site opens to a whole world of creativity, so consider settling yourself on the stairs as you take the time to read through it. You’ll be glad you did.

guest post by Maureen Carlson