Polymer pocketmen

Samrdzic on PCDaily

Could you use a friend in your pocket this Monday? Serbia’s Milos Samardzic (Tramps and Glams) creates polymer Pocketmen that he markets on Etsy. He’s been recreating silent movie stars, circus performers and book characters into offbeat polymer and wire sculptures since 2008.

The eyes and hands of the 1 1/2″ x 3″ brooches are designed to peek over the edge of your shirt pocket. “They can be shy, they can be silly, they can even be grumpy at times, but they are always devoted and honest friends,” says Milos.

See the whole cast of characters on his blog, Facebook and Twitter.

Polymer blooms

Lehmann on PCDaily

Yes, yes, Germany’s Jana Lehmann knows just what we need for Monday. Her flowerpot pins bloom with bright graphic flowers springing out of textured cone shaped Skinner-blended pots.

Each flower contains a contrasting “seed” bead and is topped with dots of polymer. Jana says she prefers flowers in pots because they last longer than cut flowers in vases.

Lehmann on PCDaily

Jana stepped away from her precise style and used only very basic tools to create these monsters for a Fimo kids book she’s writing. See the whole range of her work on Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook.

Mokume gane treat


This brooch by France’s Isabelle Chatelain speaks to me and it’s too delicious to just let it float by on Flickr. Let’s grab it and mull it over for a Friday minute.

The repeating circle patterns both change and stay the same. This is polymer mokume gane at its best and the color combination shows off the pattern nicely. It hints at Moorish mosaics and Byzantine ceilings.

Chatelain on PCDaily

Isabelle mixes bits of this design into other brooches. Her ability to assemble compositions from small chunks of mokume gane plus textures and colored shapes is remarkable. Yummy.

Find more on Facebook and in her online shop. Isabelle also teaches on CraftArtEdu.

Seeing polymer birds

Cynthia Toops combines large lentil beads covered in millefiori cane slices with small insets of micromosaic bird motifs for this new necklace called Seeing Birds.

The birds are all native to Washington state and the piece is featured in the Of a Feather show at the White River Valley Museum located between Tacoma and Seattle. Read more about the exhibition here.

I wish we had a higher resolution photo so you could dive in for a closer look at her magical images made from super fine threads of polymer.

Toops on PCDaily

For a better example, zoom in on this brooch that Cynthia made for last fall’s Tilling Time/Telling Time show at Facere Gallery. Keep in mind that the brooch is only 1 1/2 inches square! Silver bezel is by Chuck Domitrovich.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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