brooch

Dancing polymer

Hyde on PCDaily
Hyde on PCDaily

Susan Hyde’s madonnas and angels are part of my holiday attire. That’s an angel pin I bought years ago at the right. This year she added 4″ dancing women whose bright swirling colors add to their sense of movement. The round stands they dance on contribute more color. You can see them in her Bremerton, WA gallery and on Facebook.

My grandsons are coming for a visit so I’m getting myself in the mood for angels and movement and celebrating.

Undercut polymer

Montarsi on PCDaily

Jan Montarsi gives us a fine example of undercutting a veneered shape technique that Ron Lehocky showed last week. Instead of a heart outline, Jan uses a shield shape for his Carnivorous lapel pin.

The edges slope gently because he’s angled the craft knife to remove excess underneath. (Watch Ron Lehocky here if you need a refresher. See step 2 at 2:40 and 3:56.)

Of course Jan’s way with metallics makes the shape even more dramatic and with this before-and-after sanding picture, he demonstrates how that extra step adds richness and depth.

Long ago Jan shared his methods of tinting metallic clays with alcohol inks to achieve clear, warm colors. You can still find his tutorial here. See more examples on Flickr, Pinterest and Facebook.

Scrappy polymer

Hyde on PCDaily

Crisp fall days make colors brights and simple masks funnier. Look at these new pins from Susan Hyde (she’s mostly on Facebook).

A flat oval polymer face with a circle cut out gets her started on completely silly faces. A few dots and strings of clay turn into crazily raised eyebrows, a moustache or a glob of hair. A slice of any old cane will work for eyes.

Don’t forget teeth or a tongue and everybody gets a pair of jump ring earrings. Perfect Halloween favors.

Hyde on PCDaily

Start from scrap

Crothers for PCDaily

As long as we’re going for easy and effective art, check out Debbie Crothers’ scrappy cane tutorial.

I learned a similar version from Carol Blackburn who tames the tutorial and turns the results into tidy stripes and precise geometrics. Any way you handle this tute, it’s a great one to have at your disposal.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

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