Sometimes it is painted!

Geninne Zlatkis paints her polymer mobile on Polymer Clay Daily.com

New Mexico’s Geninne Zlatkis paints and decorates, illustrates, and photographs. Every once in a rare while, she works with polymer as in this bird mobile. Yes, they’re painted.

No complex techniques, just a love of birds, and an understanding of their shapes topped with an illustrator’s ability to translate feathers into lines and dots.

It’s a pleasure to see landscapes and architecture through her eyes.

Over at StudioMojo, this is what I look for. We cast a wider net to spotlight outlier artists who understand the importance of polymer as one of many tools in their toolbox. Come on down and see what surprises we’ve dug up for your weekend entertainment.

 

Her birds take wing

Joan Tayler's birds take flight on PolymerClayDaily.com

Vancouver’s Joan Tayler has a way with birds like this little one she’s calling “Dicky Bird”  that’s now a zipper pull. She also makes them into whistles, earrings, necklaces, and more.

Joan Tayler's birds take flight on PolymerClayDaily.com

Joan is creating a flock of various species for her 100-day challenge. Her drawings and in-process shots on Instagram are captivating. Joan knows her birds.

Going cuckoo

Gael Keyes goes a little cuckoo with outrageous birds on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Mexico’s Gael Keyes (@keyesgael) focused on bugs at last year’s Clayathon. This year she’s added outrageous fish and birds to her repertoire of wildlife.

Gael Keyes goes a little cuckoo with outrageous birds on PolymerClayDaily.com

Gael developed her own cane style that she pattern-matches in the Natasha bead way (here’s a quick tutorial) to create feathers, fins, and wings.

During the holidays she turns to her own brands of angels that you can see on Facebook.

It’s beginning to look a lot like ornaments

Carole Monahan's birds make easy designs for your tree on PolymerClayDaily.com

This is our second look at the ornaments that the members of the Connecticut guild (SCPCG) created for a decorated tree competition that benefits the Ronald McDonald House in New Haven.

These cardinals from Carole Monahan are lightweight and stylized. The design requires a few simple flat cutouts of textured clay with extra bits for wings, eye, and beak.

Bake the wire hanger right into the clay.  Easy, peasy and there’s still time to make them!

Sending happy out

Pamela Carman sends happy out for your Monday on PolymerClayDaily.com

“It’s the joy of riotous color and pattern that drives me to create my work. It is my way of sending happy out into the world,” says Florida’s Pamela Carmen.

Nothing better than a bird of happiness to fly into your Monday. Can you picture the supply of canes Pamela must have on hand to feather her large menagerie? See her creations on Flickr. 

Her entry in a recent show called Woof, Meow, Chirp, and Slither: Artists interpret the world of pets earned a top award from Florida CraftArt. When you send happy out, some of it returns to you.

Polymer ornithology

Marni Southam has turned a love of birds into an earring business on PolymerClayDaily.com

Australia’s Marni Southam (Oleander Avenue) has an amazing ability to turn every scrap of polymer into a bird.

Her alchemy is mesmerizing. A circle, some stripes, a triangle, more bits of color and a bird emerges. How does she do that?

Marni Southam has turned a love of birds into an earring business on PolymerClayDaily.com

Combine her knowledge of birds with a love of earrings and you’ve got a thriving business.

The story of her Blue Fairy Wrens is touching and clearly explains her obsession with ornithology. I can’t help but think of Ohio illustrator Charlie Harper whom I met when I worked for Ohio’s Department of Natural Resources.

A bird in the hand

Edith Fischer Katz finds a crow in her clay on PolymerClayDaily.com

Israel’s Edith Fischer Katz’ crow cane started at about 6″ in diameter. On Instagram, you can follow her as she builds the crow and then surrounds it with shadow and background.

She fearlessly reduces the plate-size cane. Edith cut a thick slice at about this size and sculpted a 3D crow out of the slice.

Edith Fischer Katz finds a crow in her clay on PolymerClayDaily.com

What will she do with her murder of crows? (Yes, it’s a murder of crows.) We’ll have to follow her Instagram to see where this goes.

Edith usually sculpts in clay as you can see in her Facebook photos of small figures. This cane is an interesting departure.

A polymer bird in the hand

Ukraine’s Darya Podorozhna (sofoxyclay) gathers a flock of polymer birds on a delicate chain for bird lovers to wear and admire.

While these little beads don’t require much clay, they do demand a keen eye and attention to detail. Birders know their birds. You can catch them on Etsy and here she is on Instagram.

The first week after vacation has rushed by and already I could be back in the holiday frenzy. Over at StudioMojo, we’ll try to slow it down and move into the holidays with grace, a smile, and gifts from our hearts. Join us.

Roosting after 100 days

Pamela Carmen's birds come home to roost after 100 days on PolymerClayDaily

Florida’s Pamela Carmen winds down her 100 Day project with a few more birds. Can you imagine the menagerie she’s accumulated in 100 days?

The neutral palette is a change for Pamela. Tropical colors are more to her liking and she applies slices over most any form she can find.

You’ll find her transforming vessels and found forms on Flickr and Instagram. She changes her style according to what the shape calls for. If you’ve been thinking about covering items, her work will educate you.

Birds on a wire

Darya Tarasenko sculpts birds on a wire on PolymerClayDaily

Ukraine’s Darya Tarasenko (SoFoxyClay) delights us with her sculpted polymer birds on a wire. What a great gift for a birder. And perfect for a summer Friday.

You can get to know Darya best on Pinterest. Then keep going on Facebook, Instagram, and Etsy.

If you feel close to cracking the polymer code and want more info, join us over at StudioMojo where we offer more clues to what’s happening in our world in a Saturday morning newsletter.