Sharing and inspiring

Jeff Dever and others inspire and share us in difficult times. on PolymerClayDaily.com

Maryland’s Jeffrey Lloyd Dever presents his Passage Obscura. Hanging from a long pin back, reminiscent of a medal hung on a presentation ribbon, this single round medallion has backfilled surface detailing,

For Jeff, the piece serves witness to the forces at work in a chaotic world, to obscure vision and all too often smother hope.

Two bright rays of hope come from the tutorials that educate and distract us. Click through France’s Sonya Girodon’s textures here and Utah’s Jana Roberts Benzon faux alcohol inks here. They share their inspiration free for all during tough times.

Stay strong!

Polymer fungi

Kim Heeang layers petals of polymer that mimic fungi on PolymerClayDaily

South Korea’s Kim Heeang (9angko) moves us in a more thoughtful direction.

Her delicately assembled pieces take their central theme from mushrooms, fungi hat ware neither plants nor animals. They are everywhere and then disappear without a trace.

You may note that thin petals of polymer are being used more and more. The newer clays allow us to stack paper-thin layers in ways that mimic nature.

Join us over at StudioMojo if you’re interested in how polymer is being used in surprising and unusual ways. Stay on top of the latest trends with a Saturday morning review of the week. 

Peekaboo Tuesday

Fabi Ajates mixes a new palette and patterns for ACE on PolymerClayDaily.com

Class samples are the best! Teachers take good photos and have great ideas.

These are Spain’s Fabiola Ajates’ prototypes for the October 6-10 Atlantic City Escape (ACE).

Look at how the underneath patterns peek through the cutout of the top layers. The thrill of peekaboo hangs on through adulthood.

Fabi has mixed an all-new retro 60’s palette for her class with 33 colors and patterns that make me giddy.

Reinterpreted in polymer

Jana Roberts Benzon reinterprets Attai Chen in polymer on PolymerClayDaily

Utah’s Jana Roberts Benzon turns her work in a new direction with these latest brooches.

Jana says she’s riffing on the work of Germany’s Attai Chen. He uses cast-offs, carved wood, layered paper, silver, paint, and graphite to express his aesthetic in both jewelry and wall sculptures.

But if you know Jana’s progression of works and understand that she has a background in flower arranging and a love of nature, you can see how this polymer interpretation is a natural next step.

The polymer and alcohol ink piece is 7″ x 5”. Its thin dense petals are very lightweight and it could be worn as a brooch.

How brave of Jana to show us her impressive first efforts.

What will 2020 look like?

Nadia Elkina points us toward the future of polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Will 2020 polymer look more like Poland’s Nadia Elkina’s mosaic brooch? Dimensional, mixed, polychromatic?

It’s hard to tell which elements are which medium. And who really cares? It’s the overall snap, crackle, and pop that makes this piece compelling. Look even further ahead on IG here.

Join us this weekend over at StudioMojo where we’ll have our eye on new and interesting directions we can expect in polymer 2020. Who can predict? We’re gonna try. Come on over and add your two cents.

Spirited seasonal icons

Anita Kennerley and Jan Montarsi tweak holiday icons on PolymerClayDaily.com

Simple designs contain great charm at this time of year.

Ohio’s Jan Montarsi gives dimension to the snowmen pins he made for a swap by shadowing their rounded edges. To give them personality he splurges on scarves, hats, and earmuffs.

Anita Kennerley and Jan Montarsi tweak holiday icons on PolymerClayDaily.com

Anita Kennerley builds her angel earrings by wrapping a circle and using hearts for wings. Using only a red circle, white belt, and black belt buckle, her earrings say that Santa is coming.

It’s the merry attitude in these designs that captures the spirit of the season.

Slip over to StudioMojo if you want a weekend helping of festive polymer ideas and insider news. StudioMojo comes right to your inbox each Saturday.

Fall meets winter in a brooch

Valerie Bodino Nazet lets fall and winter collide gracefully in a polymer brooch on PolymerClayDaily.com

Now isn’t that the essence of fall?

France’s Valérie Bodino-Nazet situates a polymer shield shape of fall’s oranges, golds, and blues next to winter’s black and whites. She bisects the brooch with a flowing wire shape. 

I couldn’t tell if Valerie had finished the construction when she took this photo but my eye shouted, “Stop! That’s it.”

Here’s the brooch on Instagram.

Alluring or menacing

We recoil but can't dismiss the beauty of this brooch from Anna Nel on PolymerClayDaily.com

Your reflexes may make you flinch but the colors will make you look twice at this brooch from Poland’s Anna Nel.

The snake is covered with slices of a mosaic-like cane in stunning blues, rusts, gold, and white. Its head is covered with a slice that’s matched in a Natasha bead style.

It’s menacing in the most beautifully alluring way.

A closer look

Pilar Rodríguez Domínguez makes us look closely at her skillfully blended canes on PolymerClayDaily

Let’s close a sunny week with a sunny brooch from Canary Islands’ Pilar Rodríguez Domínguez (Amatista). I snagged this from her Instagram a little while ago and kept returning for another look.

That’s a sure sign that there’s something interesting going on. The canes (available on Etsy) have a stained-glass quality about them. There’s a sensual, sinewy feel too.

It takes a moment for all the blends and colors to register. It must be the fine dark line between elements that makes these bright colors read so well.

Figuring out what makes a piece of art grab us is part of what we’ll be looking at over at StudioMojo this weekend. You’d be surprised what you can learn by taking the time for a closer look. Join us.

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