Be grateful

Ron Lehocky and Jayne Dwyer bring us Thanksgiving turkeys on PolymerClayDaily.com

Jayne Dwyer and Ron Lehocky teamed up for today’s batch of hearts. Jayne’s canes, Ron’s hearts. A marvelous collaboration.

You may not be where you intended to be this Thanksgiving. It doesn’t matter.

You can be friends with anybody, you can be family with anybody.

Reach out to someone today. Be thankful.

Red fox ornaments

Laurel Swetnam hangs scrap foxes on the tree on PolymerClayDaily.com

Portland’s Laurel Swetnam loves her deep reds and oranges. By this time of year, she’s left with lots of cane ends and leftover veneers.

Not a problem! The patterns and colors play nicely with each other as she pieces them into these charmingly angular fox ornaments. Simple shapes become stunning ornaments.

How I spent 2020

Julie Eakes goes rogue in 2020 with bright, funky earrings on PolymerClayDaily.com

It’s 2020 so why be predictable? Bet you didn’t guess the maker of these funky dangles.

North Carolina’s Julie Eakes creates photo mosaics and silk road patchwork and 3D dolls. She even dipped her brush into gelli prints. So it’s not surprising that she’s wandered off the reservation again with these layered cane slice earrings.

“Kinda crazy, like this year,” she says. Why not?


A PCD reader took me to task for my casual comment about “going off the reservation” in this post and she is right. My apologies for using an insensitive and racist phrase. As I told her, it stings to be taken to task…but in a good way and I thanked her for making me more aware. 

The joy of voting

Cynthia Tinapple refreshes stars and stripes at the polls on PolymerClayDaily.com

High fives to the dance parties and parades and celebrations at the polls. In the midst of terrible news, it felt good to be standing in line being proactive with lots of fellow voters.

I took apart a very old necklace to bring you today’s graphic. Isn’t it amazing how stars and stripes can be combined and recombined? Even the tail ends can be made into what looks like fireworks. There’s joy at the polls. Join the party.

Debbie Jackson’s got the blues

Debbie Jackson showcases her indigo patterns on PolymerClayDaily.com

Yes, I’ve really got the blues, not because I’m sad, but for the love of the rich blues of African Indigo-dyed textiles produced by the Yoruba people of Nigeria.

The hinged vessel pendant above is titled, Gathering of the Masaai, an ethnic group from Kenya and Tanzania. I love how they adorn themselves in layers of beaded neckpieces.

This mixed media piece includes African Indigo Textile, seed beads, and cane work. To see more of how I’ve had the blues over the summer, click this link…

The rhythm of polymer

Chris Baird makes polymer bits reverberate on PolymerClayDaily.com

Zero in on Chris Baird’s brooches featuring shapes, flowers, birds, and fish that are different from the usual. This Minneapolis artist works small and relies on gradations of dots and stripes.

Chris Baird makes polymer bits reverberate on PolymerClayDaily.com

Chris slices narrow bits of graduated or striped canes and places them next to each other on shaped bases. The light and dark bits reverberate against each other.

She keeps the tap-tap-tap going with indentations and repeated textures. The beat goes on. Here’s Chris on Etsy.

Soothing pinks

Dayl Goulsbra-Jones makes a stash of soothing pink canes on PolymerClayDaily

Normally, pink isn’t what you’d think of as a soothing color. But these pinkish canes from the UK’s Dayl Goulsbra-Jones (Planet.Isis) provide the perfect stress-reliever.

The patterns are organized and repetitive and well-executed. Look at them and exhale.

I should have more to say, but I don’t. They make me giddy. Think pink.

Patterns that light up

MelaMelanie Allan lights up translucent kaleidoscope canes on PolymerClayDailynie Allan lights up polymer with translucent kaleidoscope canes on PolymerClayDaily

Australia’s Melanie Allan (innervisionpc) lights up her polymer! What looks like a lovely glass bottle covered with polymer cane slices comes to life when lit from within.

Melanie definitely has a “cane brain” that gravitates to very complex patterns that she brings to life in big kaleidoscope canes.

Melanie Allan lights up translucent kaleidoscope canes on PolymerClayDaily

Here’s the surprising part. Melanie zooms out from the big kaleidoscope and focuses back in on the juiciest, most spectacular smaller patterns. Those smaller patterns she features in earrings.

When you look at her IG and FB, concentrate on big pattern/small pattern to follow how she moves in and out.

Garden elements

Cecile Bos will combine these elements into a garden scene on PolymerClayDaily.com

You probably have some questions about how France’s Cécile Bos (11prunes) creates these delicate canes.

How big are the original canes (these seem impossibly small), what’s her inspiration?

Cecile intends to mix up these canes. The white background surrounding each of them ensures that she can combine the elements into a larger botanical image.

Here’s a previous similar cane to give you an idea where she’s headed. Cecile brings a fabric designer’s sensibility to polymer. We are used to kaleidoscoping and repeating designs. These are complex canes from a different perspective.

Snagged by canes

Marni Southam from Australia’s Oleander Avenue hosted the FriClay challenge last week. The topic was Shibori and these are the canes she came up with to illustrate the concept. They’re a fresh, Aussie, updated Shibori.

My eye keeps getting snagged by canes. I tidied my laundry room/pandemic studio. I feel a tug on my sleeve from my inner little girl artist plaintively saying, “It’s only two colors. We could try this.” She really wants to play. It’s time to let her/us have some fun.

Do you have a younger-you asking for some playtime?