A nudge for swap items

Lynn Yuhr's leaves for a swap raise the bar on PolymerClayDaily.com

I’m smitten with these modern collaged leaves from Florida’s Lynn Yuhr. The gradations, the canes, the painted details on her slightly cupped leaves can’t be missed.

These are some of Lynn’s swap items for an upcoming retreat and they raise the bar for the rest of the participants who are still mulling over what to make.

We try to stay away from competitiveness but it creeps in whether we like it or not. A nudge like this one from Lynn makes for an exciting swap.

Long-running projects

Watch Cristina Garcia Alvarez challenge herself for 100 days on PolymerClayDaily.com

Spain’s Cristina García Alvarez (espiralarte) gives us a window into her journey through a 100-day project on Instagram.

On day 20 she took a turn that you may like when she paired Skinner blends with Bettina Welker-like retro canes. She added quirky textures and sped along with variations on the days that followed. Cristina gives us a window into her world as she continues to explore these designs. Click through her days and watch her progress.

We’ll be looking at how artists grow and change in the StudioMojo weekend newsletter this Saturday. Instead of sulking about how I haven’t participated in 100-day efforts like Cristina’s, I’ve decided to celebrate that StudioMojo has been perking along for 408 weeks. Yikes! It’s my own kind of long-running project that you can join at any time!

When pigs…

What is Alice Stroppel telling us with her flying pigs on PolymerClayDaily.com?

Sometimes it’s clear what message polymer artists want to tell us.

What could Florida’s Alice Stroppel possibly be communicating with her latest edition of flower-covered pigs with wings?

Alice hints that “Serious fun happens when pigs fly.”  There’s no holding Alice back. Her pigs will happily fly whenever she wants them to. There’s a lot we could learn from the spunky, irreverent Alice.

Speaking of unexpected fun, come on over to this week’s StudioMojo where we follow Into the Forest exhibit creators Laura Tabakman, Julie Eakes and Emily Squires Levine. Teaching their polymer methods to incarcerated women was a more joyful experience than they ever anticipated. Come find out why. 

The attraction of ease

Barbara Baatz brings spontaneity to her beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

These beads from New Jersey’s Barbara Baatz (baatzbeads) are unpretentious and relaxed. They’re full of heart and devil-may-care attitude. They match but they’re not matchy-matchy.

It’s sometimes wise to step back, ease up and let that inner wild thing have some fun. Maybe it was taking yesterday off that has me appreciating simplicity.

Perfection is overrated and aiming for it sometimes sucks the energy out of our work. Do you need more spontaneity? See more on Instagram.

Some assembly required polymer

Ivy Niles sells raw cactus canes...some assembly required on PolymerClayDaily

Nebraska’s Ivy Niles (Ikandyclay) rolls a mighty fine cactus cane that can be arranged in any number of ways. They can also be planted in cane slice containers decorated with matching designs.

Ivy Niles sells raw cactus canes...some assembly required on PolymerClayDaily

To create the cane gradations and the spiky needles requires a lot of head scratching. For those who prefer, she sells her canes ready-made and raw on Etsy. Her designs are marvelously complex. Some assembly required.

Blooming spring

Tracy Feldwick's bloom opens on PolymerClayDaily.com

How do I know spring has sprung? There are delicious colors all over including this pod from Australia’s Tracy Feldwick (Mimosa Muse on IG and Twitter)

But wait, March isn’t Spring in Australia! Ah, this was posted several months ago. That explains.

She mixes patterns inside and out. Her stamen are gaining color as they grow. Spectacular.

Zazu zips through a geometric collection


Zazu zips through cutting and arranging layers to create a collection on PolymerClayDaily

The rhythm of cutting and replacing pieces of clay, especially at high speed, makes this process look simple and satisfying.

Watch Spain’s Zazu cut and swap layers of stripes and solids.

Using only a blade and some geometric cutters she reassembles pieces of striped canes and solids into an entire collection of jewelry.

There are days that whiz by when things go as swimmingly as this. Let’s hope today is one of them.

Gems by the slice

Meg Newberg reveals the secrets of faceted stones on PolymerClayDaily.com

Arizona’s Meg Newberg has unlocked the secrets of gemstones with her latest tutorial.

Make the cane and then shape each slice into whatever cut you prefer- brilliant, pear, marquise, emerald?

Meg sorted out the facets and organized them into a step-by-step for those of us who work with more malleable materials.

Meg Newberg reveals the secrets of faceted stones on PolymerClayDaily.com

Don’t love to make canes? Meg also sells her diamonds in 2″ long canes ready for slicing.

Arm candy

Ingrid Ulrich constructs dramatic polymer bracelets on PolymerClayDaily.com

How much of these bracelets is polymer is anyone’s guess. Germany’s Ingrid Ulrich deftly mixes her media. The bracelets with their dramatic focal pieces make graphic puzzles for the eye and the arm. Look at them closely on Instagram.

Ingrid has challenged herself with polymer bracelet construction for a long time. The bracelet gallery on her website gives bracelet makers lots of ideas to start the week.

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