Polymer makeovers

Ginny Parrish gives containers a second life on PolymerClayDaily.com

I’m stuck on vessels this week. These bumpy, tall, short, lidded, and open containers are from North Carolina’s Ginny Parrish (bluefrogclay) who’s embarked on a vessel tour of her own.

Her in-progress shots show how she gives an olive can a makeover for her spring show.

Need a change of pace? Update a lowly jar to a keepsake.

Simplifying the complicated

Meg Newberg simplifies cane-building on PolymerClayDaily

Arizona’s Meg Newbert (polymerclayworkshop) thinks canes. She likes nothing better than to take designs that look impossibly complex and make them doable for both beginners and experienced caners. She’s done this every month for years!

It’s like mental gymnastics for those who’ve been at this a while. Lots of us may not make the cane she suggests but following along still gives us a thrill. Did I mention that at $5/month, she’s the best deal around for those who never tire of the thrill of slicing into a snake of clay for the big reveal?

What do you suppose Meg’s stash of canes looks like by now?


New products are coming off the production line, clay is climbing back on the shelves and shows are starting up. It’s a crazy world but in some corners, we’re trying to stay sane and creative. See what’s blooming this spring in Saturday’s StudioMojo

Dots with a twist

Wiwat Kamolpornwijit gives his dots an unexpected twist on PolymerClayDaily.com

Wiwat Kamolpornwijit started his show season with a twist in Florida last weekend. Dots are a hot item and Wiwat gives his a twist that plays with geometry.

He backs dotted veneers with silver clay that he cuts into circles. Sliced across the middle, half the circle heads east and the other flips west as they are mounted on round silver links.

Sometimes we like the unexpected.

Heartwarming blends

Lindsey of VividClay wraps blends in heartwarming ways on PolymerClayDaily

Make three small curvy blends (white to orangy pink, orangy pink to darker pink, pink to nearly purple) then wrap them in thin black and pinch them so they bend around each other. There’s something special about these conjoined hearts from Lindsey of VividClay.

If you’ve seen Lindsey’s paradox cane tutorial on YouTube you know that she has a knack for manipulating blends in eye-catching ways. These hearts entwine in similar mesmerizing ways.

When someone gives you potatoes…

Barbara Nalepa mirrors how we feel the day before Thanksgiving on PolymerClayDaily.com

Barbara Nalepa (Barmisal) pretty much captures how we feel here in the US on the day before Thanksgiving.

How to shove working, shopping, and cooking into one short day?

A few scraps of black and white canes express our potato-mashing, turkey-basting, table-setting exasperation.

Eventually, we’ll take a breath, sit down and remember how thankful we are for this wild and crazy life. Happy Thanksgiving!

I’m sinking!

Robyn (Kaori) will suck you into her clever cane vortex. Be careful on PolymerClayDaily.com

This cane from Australia’s Robyn (shop.Kaori) sucked me in like quicksand in a B grade adventure movie. It’s pulled me in repeatedly.

What’s going on here? The neon colors, the black background, the over/under! How does it work? I’m lost in the jungle. Robyn’s been working with polymer for nearly 30 years so she knows her way around.

I give up. Looks like I’m going to have to grab Patreon to save myself.

FRIDAY FOLLOW: Mary Anne Loveless’ turkey recipe

Mary Anne Loveless and her gobble til you wobble turkeys on PolymerClayDaily.com

Utah’s Mary Anne Loveless shows us how she makes Thanksgiving guests overlook even the most generic and predictable Thanksgiving cuisine.

Have you got some orange/brown cane ends? Some muddy scraps (who doesn’t)? You’ve got all the ingredients for your own Gobble til you Wobble recipe.

Don’t worry, yours won’t look like Mary Anne’s. The object isn’t copying. We’re only trying to bring some smiles to the table. Thanks to Mary Anne for showing us how. Follow her, she’s full of good ideas.


Speaking of news you can use, trot on over to StudioMojo. It’s the Saturday newsletter for art-makers at any level who want to ignite their creativity and bring more of what they love to their art.

Masks as spirit homes

Bali’s Jon Stuart Anderson takes masks to a whole new level with this 15.8 x 9.4 x 2.8-inch beauty.

In Bali, the gods are considered to be present in all things and art-making is revered. Masks are created as beautiful ‘homes’ for the spirits and energies to dwell in when they visit the physical world.

Look at all the eyes and imagery in Jon’s mask. There are multiple colors in every cane. Even solid colors are actually made of several shades.

Look deeply at this spirit home.

Halloween hearts

Bones on Ron Lehocky's hearts? Sure! on PolymerClayDaily.com

What? We haven’t crowed about Kentucky’s Ron Lehocky for ages! This Halloween Heart feature will fix that!

Here are some of Ron’s latest with two of my favorite ingredients…dots (of course) and canes from Nebraska’s Ivy Niles (ikandyclay).

Every bone is incredibly detailed. To achieve such precision Ivy probably reduced the parts in sections. Can’t you imagine her humming,”…the hip bone’s connected to the thigh bone.. ” as she reduced and assembled these tiny, tiny guys?  (She still has a few on her Etsy site!)

Ron has recently collaborated with super-caners Jon Anderson and Jayne Dwyer for some other knock-your-socks-off hearts too. And they’re all for the Kids.


We’ll start the party this Saturday with more goblins and ghoulies and candy in Saturday’s StudioMojo. No costumes required. Sign up here.

FOLLOWFRIDAY: Kristin Vaughn

Kristin Vaughn assembles her fabric canes for her huge audience on PolymerClayDaily.com

Iowa’s Kristin Vaughn (ShopHillsideStudio) boasts about her booming polymer business. If you’ve been tracking canes that repeat in a fabric-like method you’ve probably ended up at Kristin’s site. You’ve got to have a vision, an eye-pleasing palette, and scads of small graphic canes to make this work. Kristin has all of that.

She’s been working with polymer for 6 years and has a whopping 141,000 followers. I can’t fathom that. Kristin welcomes your mucking about in her site where you can watch her assemble these babies.


It’s Friday! Consider this post an invite to join us for our StudioMojo Happy Hour on Saturday. I’d love to pop my flashy, chatty roundup of the best in polymer in your inbox. Come dish with us.