Back in a booth again


Rebecca Thickbroom makes the most of simple earring shapes on PolymerClayDaily.com

There are all sorts of “wowser” weekend posts out there but I’m stuck on the earring explorations from UK’s Rebecca Thickbroom.

She takes the football shape (or is a leaf shape a more accurate description) and combines with squares, circles, rectangles to arrive at a whole collection of earrings.

The finishes are scuffed and scratched. The colors are muted. Rebecca’s playing around makes me realize how I miss doing that.

Those of us stuck in isolation are wistful about how she enjoyed a weekend in-person, socially-distanced show (oldspitalfieldsmarket). It looks almost unreal. Here’s hoping that we can all experience that again soon.

Sometimes I don’t know…

To someone somewhere, polymer earrings that soothe on PolymerClayDaily.com

Sometimes I don’t know who made it or what it’s made of but my alarm bells start chiming and I run to see who’s at the door.

After an exhausting day, I was happy to settle on these earrings from Maria De Oliveira. (to someonesomewhere). Obituaries came up when I googled her. That can’t be right!

Instead of digging up Maria and verifying the material, I’m just going with my gut and the huge exhale I felt when I happened upon these ombre earrings. My shoulders dropped, my neck felt better. They’re what we would call Skinner blends. I’m calling it a polymer post.

There’s a bulging file folder of clickable candies just waiting for me to organize them into this week’s StudioMojo. When I feel everything’s a hot mess, that’s usually when I’m on the right track. Come see if I’m onto somthing good.

Garden inspirations

Pavla Cepelikova creates Columbines on PolymerClayDaily.com

Czech Republic’s Pavla Cepelikova (SaffronAddict) has taken liberties with her version of the Columbine flowers (at the top right of the photo).

The long tubes drape down and flare to reveal secret colors as they open at the bottom. Pavla likes these bell shapes in her garden and polymer will allow her to wear them on her ears.

What inspiration is blooming in your garden?

Pansies on the wire

Iryna Chajka drapes spectacular pansies from a hoop on PolymerClayDaily.com

At this time of year, I very much admire gardeners who can weed and prune their gardens to highlight spectacular specimens. They run to their studios to replicate them in polymer.

See how Ukraine’s Iryna Chajka suspends pansies from metal hoops.

She specializes in succulents but her pansies are outstanding.

You snooze, you lose

Brenda Billy Tan turns cityscapes into earrings on PolymerClayDaily.com

I meant to bring these wonderful cityscapes from Singapore’s Brenda Billy Tan (Wherabilly} to you earlier in the week.

Now they’re all sold out.

Don’t you love how the rooftop angles are boiled down to their essence?  Whole cities are captured with cuts in the clay.

We missed how she turned them into earrings.

It’s hard to keep up with the progress of our artform! See all the goodies that I couldn’t stuff into PCD in the weekend’s StudioMojo. 

Polymer with grit

Marisa Winston makes earrings for women with grit on PolymerClayDaily.com

These pale iridescent curls of textured polymer form earrings in the summer collection of North Carolina’s Marisa Winston.

Her shop named Ostrea means ‘oyster’ in Latin. “Everyone is familiar with the phrase ‘no grit, no pearl,’ but my experience has taught me how true this really is,” Marisa says.

The name is a reminder of the power we have to transform life’s grit into resilience, inner beauty, and strength. Her earrings are made for “women with grit.”

Experience the soft ocean colors and curvy sea shapes on her website.

Earrings with a twist

Susan Sju twists patterns into lightweight dangles on PolymerClayDaily.com

These featherweight dangles from Macedonia’s Susan Sju stopped me in my tracks.

Don’t you love to reverse-engineer pieces? I’m not sure I understand how Susan got to this point and she has even more confounding and delightful patterns on her Facebook. Extruded blended strings laid next to each other and flattened perhaps?

Susan Sju twists patterns into lightweight dangles on PolymerClayDaily.com

Look at the displays in her Ohrid retail store and you’ll see that she’s got lots of tricks up her sleeve.

I’m trying to order a pair of these imaginative swirls from her recently-launched online store. Thanks to Sabine Spiesser for alerting me to Susan.

Flowers and flutters

Bonnie Bishoff suspends translucent curls from wire cable on PolymerClayDaily.com

I admit to having an art crush on Maine’s Bonnie Bishoff. Take a closer look at her imaginative use of stainless steel wire. She has mastered using Apoxie Sculpt as a strong base form. Her color sense is impeccable and makes my heart sing.

And now she’s laid up with a broken foot but still, she posts sumptuous earrings to her webshop. She and her husband have crafted a great life.

Here two thin translucent slivers of clay curl toward each other as they dangle from wire cable. Light as a feather.

If you need a mid-week pick-me-up, go admire the flowery and fluttery earrings in her shop.

No shrinking violets

Maryanne Loveless finds hundreds of flowers in her garden on PolymerClayDaily.com

Utah’s Maryanne Loveless has been creating a garden of earrings for her 100-day challenge. No shy, shrinking violets here.

She arranges flower petal and leaf cane slices a backing shape and then adds texture, pods, and dotted details. They hang head up or down. She arranges a garden of delight from a handful of small canes.

Maryanne and her mother started long ago making salt dough creations and she carries on the tradition. Here she is on Etsy.

Her birds take wing

Joan Tayler's birds take flight on PolymerClayDaily.com

Vancouver’s Joan Tayler has a way with birds like this little one she’s calling “Dicky Bird”  that’s now a zipper pull. She also makes them into whistles, earrings, necklaces, and more.

Joan Tayler's birds take flight on PolymerClayDaily.com

Joan is creating a flock of various species for her 100-day challenge. Her drawings and in-process shots on Instagram are captivating. Joan knows her birds.