Blurring the lines with enamels

Nikolina Otrzan replicates enamel's blurry lines on PolymerClayDaily.com

Polymer artists have long tried to replicate the soft blurry edges that are the hallmark of copper enameled pieces.

Low fire (cold) enamel powders were rumored to be the answer but my vials of powders went to the back of a bottom drawer several years ago after some messy attempts.

Nikolina Otrzan replicates enamel's blurry lines on PolymerClayDaily.com

Croatia’s Nikolina Otrzan makes me want to dig out my powders and give it another go. Her tutorial shows me where I went wrong. She uses liquid polymer, layers and other tricks to keep the powders under control.

Nikolina has lots more patience than I do. She loads up her instructions with photos and steps. I pare them down for my experiments to see how they fit my style.

Imitative enamels may be the next big thing. If this rings your chimes, now’s the time to explore.

Clusters of green

Liga Valge gathers chips of polymer for a fashion ring on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ireland’s Liga Valge (ValgStudio) resisted selling this ring of clustered green chunks. With its inclusions and patterns, it looks geological but it’s made of faceted polymer bits.

She gathers the chips together into a compelling fashion statement in time for St. Patrick’s Day.

See Liga here on Facebook.

Monday zigzags

Greece’s Katerina Strouggari (@mepolymeraki) zigs and zags her polymer earrings, tucking in balls of clay for an imitative soutache design.

She starts with one long strip of black and white, adding alternating colors of balls between each turn.

Soutache is the narrow braid embroidery associated with military and band uniforms.

See how she creates the same effect on pendants on Facebook

Polymer petroglyphs

Deb Harts debuts new Southwest inspired imitative inlays on PolymerClayDaily

Texas’ Deb Hart shows the start of these petroglyphs on Instagram but how she arrives at the small squares with caned petroglyph images in the middle is still baffling.

They are built into an extruded string outline. Wow, that looks labor-intensive. She’s releasing more photos of her progress on the new inlays as she goes.

Here, she shows a Zuni Bear petroglyph and a coiled snake. Maybe she’s gearing up for a tutorial about her newly developed methods.

See an overview of Deb’s Southwest and Native American-inspired sculptures and jewelry on Flickr.

See-through polymer

We can see through Kathrin Neumaier's earrings but not her methods on PolymerClayDaily.com

In her latest batch of Flickr photos, Kathrin Neumaier gives us an update on her studies in coaxing liquid polymer to behave like glass.

This series appears to be solid. She says in her captions that she’s using liquid Fimo. Kathrin has also mastered using Cernit and other materials in her quest to unlock the secrets of how to imitate glass with polymer.

Do a search on PCD and you’ll see that we’ve been curious about Kathrin’s methods for years.Can you figure it out?

 

 

Lampworking sleight of hand

Anna Nel's canes imitate lampworking on PolymerClayDaily.com

Anna Nel’s hollow beads look remarkably like lampwork. It’s Friday so you have the weekend to sit and study her beads and the cane they came from.

Anna Nel readies her palette on PolymerClayDaily.com

She uses some ingenious combination of mokume gane and Skinner blended bulleyes to pull off this sleight of hand. Anna says she was inspired by Arizona’s mountains. She even offers a photo of her luminous palette. Look on Facebook and Instagram.

Anna Nel's canes imitate lampworking on PolymerClayDaily.com

Come on over and join us on StudioMojo, a Saturday morning in-depth look at the week in polymer. Grab a cup of tea, open your newsletter, and create yourself a wonderful weekend!

 

Conversational polymer

Barb Handy's hearts are conversational on PolymerClayDaily.com

Nothing says Valentines Day to me more than old-fashioned conversation hearts. Arizona’s Barb Handy (barbiesbest) makes an exact copy in polymer that’s hard to resist.

They’re perfectly simulated from the chalky colors to the pink ink to the typeface. Her charms are made 1/4″ thick and drilled either vertically or horizontally. Barb has it down perfectly.

Happy Valentines Day!

Tribal echoes

Shelley Atwoods' tribal echoes on PolymerClayDaily.com

The stitching marks on Shelley Atwood’s earrings contain echoes of Kanta stitching, embroidery from South Asia that’s quite popular. The red beads on the edge provide a wonderful contrast.

Much of Shelley’s work has a tribal and fabric look that’s both powerful and fashionable. Go to her site and Facebook to get the full effect.

Benzon branches out

Jana Roberts Benzon branches out in her Nature Walk class on PolymerClayDaily.com

Why a branch on PCD today? Because it’s polymer and over the past year Jana Roberts Benzon has refined and refined her tools and technique for shaving polymer until it looks spiky. It’s remarkably durable.

Like yesterday’s Julie Picarello and her hardware store appropriations, Jana grabbed tools from a nail tech’s drawer for her new trick.

This is just one of the goodies from Jana’s Nature Walk workshop scheduled for March 17 and 18 in Texas. Taking classes from artists who have already done the laborious research saves you oodles of time and allows you to daydream about how you could integrate their research into your own style.