Stacking snowflakes

Kurent on PCDaily

The holidays are mostly over but let’s take one last look before all the ornaments are put away. Slovenia’s Klavdija Kurent starts with snowflake cutters in stepped down sizes (I’m guessing here).

She colors the polymer cutouts and then adds textures and stacks them, adding more color and metallics for emphasis. There’s more of her distinctive style on her blog and her Facebook site.

You can see that Klavdija has some tricks up her sleeve and she’ll be sharing them in her Let’s Twist Again workshop at Eurosynergy in Malta. Contact her by email to register.

Hyde’s polymer angels

Discussions about holiday spirit wouldn’t be complete without mentioning another of my polymer clay favorites, Seattle’s Susan Hyde. She sent these two examples of her latest angels dressed in her signature colors with extruded clay slices as accents. Those colors are pure holiday eye candy.

Her fabric tutorial (a Skinner blend with shreds of contrasting color mixed in and stacked into plaids) is one of the best for polymer clay color lovers.

Sahl’s polymer clay gingerbread houses

Nothing gets me more in the mood for the holidays than Sharon Sahl’s polymer clay gingerbread houses. She made only 10 for sale this year and there are just a couple left. Click on the large versions of her photos to see how detailed these beauties are.

“I buy and measure candies and cookies and gum and make them 1/4 sized with whatever clays best match their opacity. Trees are built from green star shapes, baked and then layered with white clay icing. For the cookies, I make an original with as much detail as I can fit onto a 1/2 inch disc, make a mold, and then pull every cookie from that mold. Gumdrops are coated with very fine glass beads and really look like gumdrops,” Sharon explains.

Her “Christmas Kids” ornaments are created with equal attention to detail. Sharon has moved back to Ohio and we’re happy she’s returned.

Hunt’s stacking polymer trees

Australia’s Amanda Hunt has created cheery polymer clay ornaments/pendants made of graduated disks that will make a perfect pro

ject for the young artists in my neighborhood who stop by to make something for the holidays.

Creating simple yet sophisticated designs is quite a trick and Amanda’s done it well. The way she translates her doodles and drawings into polymer clay pieces is intriguing as well. Take a look here and here.

Perry’s candy cornaments

Let’s tiptoe over to the darker side of Halloween and begin with these slightly frightening polymer clay “Candy Cornaments” from Lance Perry of Crescent Designs.

“I like to think that my work can ease one’s growing pains by taking them back to their childhood, if only for a moment,” Lance says of his art.

He shows and sells his wares on Etsy, Flickr and also hangs out at SpookyTimeJingles where their tagline says “sweet ‘n spooky commingle.” That should get you in the spirit.

I’ve been batting aside the spooky cobwebs in my attic. I’ve avoided tossing and sorting up there for ten years. This year my husband wouldn’t accept “working on the blog” as an excuse and I no longer have a job to insulate me from attic duty. Taking family portraits out of their frames and scanning them (see my early avatar) has been a fun and time-consuming side benefit.

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