Throw scraps on the walls

Jess Erickson and her daughter celebrate their scraps on PolymerClayDaily.com

Michigan’s Jess Erickson (cryingheartcraftco) and her young daughter show off the scrap flowers they cut out to decorate her bedroom.

I get misty thinking about how my daughter and I discovered polymer together as we made cakes and pizzas for her dollhouse.

There’s no better way to boost a kid’s confidence than to decorate their space with bright happy memories of creative times together.

Eggactly

Kathy Koontz uses her bargello veneer for holiday eggs on PolymerClayDaily.com

No messy dip-dying for South Carolina’s Kathy Koontz (flowertownoriginals).

Kathy Koontz uses her bargello veneer for holiday eggs on PolymerClayDaily.com

Her Easter eggs are covered with polymer scraps turned into stripes and then taken a step farther.

Kathy offsets the stripes to make a bargello veneer. Her resulting zigzag pattern is hypnotically, obsessively detailed.

Now what? Veneers are fun to make but it’s not always clear how to use the results. Eggactly!

If making bargello is new to you, watch this YouTube tutorial from Australia’s Jessama.

Rough and ready polymer

Myranda Escamilla roughs up her new palette on PolymerClayDaily.com

Texas’ Myranda Escamilla uses what she has onhand as she slaps together rough-hewn textures and stone color mixes for a bold fashion look.

“I’ve realized brown is usually available for purchase or at the very least, easier to find than other shades, and to save what precious clay I have, I’ve had to make-do,” she explains. The exercise pushed her out of her color comfort zone and into what turned out to be a trendy collection.

See more on her second Instagram page. The look is very 2021.

Desert visions in progress

John and Corliss Rose are grateful for their quarantine creating on PolymerClayDaily.com

John and Corliss Rose are grateful to be creating in their quarantine corral, otherwise called their California studio.

This Mojave Bouquet was a product of an “In Progress” box of odds and sods that they’re giving new life.

John and Corliss Rose are grateful for their quarantine creating on PolymerClayDaily.com

The brooch is 3″ x 2.25″ with a fabricated sterling silver back and mechanism which you can see in these front and back photos.

Do you have odds and sods waiting to be turned into something remarkable? What better time than now to use what you have?

Puzzling polymer

Ivana Svobodova puzzles her scraps together on PolymerClayDaily

Czech Republic’s  Ivana Svobodová makes a game of collecting all her thin, tiny scraps and then sitting down for a game of assemblage. Nothing goes to waste as she creates a series of puzzled brooches.

The face parts mixed in with all the patterns add an element of surprise and mystery.

Ivana Svobodova puzzles her scraps together on PolymerClayDaily

Broken hearts

Carol Beal makes crazy quilt hearts for new neighbors on PolymerClayDaily.com

These “Broken Hearts: Keeping a Safe Distance” brought tears to my eyes. They’re from Kansas’ Carol Beal (BeadUnsupervised).

The hearts are certainly wonky and broken but they’re also joyful and celebratory. Carol says she made them for some new neighbors.

The hearts have a crazy quilt vibe. Such a vibrant collage of scraps!

More of her art on Facebook.

More zen blends

What can you do when you’re drawn to one more look at the news? Instead, try this link to Arizona’s Meg Newberg (Polymer Clay Workshop). You’ll be hypnotized by her simple, scrappy blends.

A solid background color unifies the crazy, devil-may-care dots of companion colors.

Whatever she throws into the blend oozes into its neighbor to make a lovely ombre.

The idea that a hot mess turns into something lovely is a hopeful analogy for today. Go watch and feel hopeful. Several more on her Instagram.

Polymer patchwork creatures

Lisa Gauthier makes a warm and comfy elephant ornament on PolymerClayDaily.com

Connecticut’s Lisa Gauthier will hang this patchwork elephant on the tree in a competition that will benefit the Ronald McDonald House in New Haven.

I’m guessing that the patches are veneers made from scrap canes which Lisa makes look real and comfy.

The SCPCG has pulled out all the stops for this competition and we’ve featured several entries. Their Creatures Great and Small are winners in our book. Congrats to the guild for their outstanding efforts.

Join us over at StudioMojo this Saturday and be inspired by the latest shows and competitions. It’s beginning to look a lot like the holidays!

Polymer roots

Shelley Atwood puts her own spin on scrap mokume gane earrings on PolymerClayDaily.com

Think of polymer techniques as having a lineage when you look at these earrings from Texas’ Shelley Atwood.

Kathy Amt taught Dayle Doroshow who shared it with me who showed a whole bunch of folks this scrap technique on video. Who knows where it came from even earlier or where it will go next?

It’s circled back around to Shelley who’s put her own spin on it on Instagram. Shelley layered thin bits of scrap and then carved her design, which revealed colors underneath.

It’s invigorating when we see new life in our roots.

RSS
Follow by Email