Tips and Tricks

Polymer plaid

Enjoy the festive simplicity of a plaid cane from Katie Oskin (KatersAcres). The design may remind you of the holiday tablecloth waiting to be pulled out for upcoming celebrations and meals.

Katie used the cane to create accessories for a batch of her Merry Moose figures. You can see more of her work on Facebook and her site.

What could you whip up with four or five colors and this easy over/under design? Enjoy your weekend!

Dizzying patterns in polymer

Newberg on PCDaily

Sometimes we polymer artists just want to sit and admire the work that goes into a series of canes like this lovely black and white grouping from Meg Newberg. And she doesn’t extrude!

Meg has a brain made for caning. She knows how to break the process down into bite-sized pieces that she shares in monthly tutorials. Take a look on Etsy, Facebook and her site.

Breathe in and let your eyes dance around the patterns. Feel better?

Cranberries in polymer

Lloyd on PCDaily

Are you thinking cranberries? Even if you don’t like the taste you gotta love the color. The UK’s Clare Lloyd captures mouthwatering berry colors beautifully.

From deep pinks through reds, burgundies, and dark currants, each of Clare’s colors is luscious.

A look at her palettes on FolksyPinterest, Instagram and Facebook may prompt you to mix your own batch of winter reds.

Curio Curious?

Tinapple on PCDaily

Can you imagine cutting these polymer pieces by hand? Today’s die cutting machines make delicate cutting much easier. Join me for a Craftcast online class this Saturday to see how.

Stripes that sizzle

Blackburn on PCDaily

This striped free-form hollow bead necklace from London’s Carol Blackburn certainly brightens our week!

Carol has an absolutely magical and ingenious way of creating these patterns. She often cuts and reassembles simple stripes into more complex geometric forms (see her Chop and Change workshop) but the stripes also look gorgeous on their own.

See examples of her stripe manipulations on Flickr and catch up with her latest on Facebook.

More geometry

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hi_low_drawn

If you like your geometry with a dash of chaos, take a look at California’s HighLowJewelry.

Sonya Gallardo mixes her chaos with geometry and adds a heaping spoonful of fashion.

hi_low_process2

Here some squiggles of polymer on black clay roll out into an abstract creation. There’s plenty to admire on her site, on Instagram, and pinterest. This is geometry for minimalists.

Mixing polymer digitally

Burgess on PCDaily

The UK’s Jon Burgess brings his computer drawings to polymer in the ways that don’t have the usual hard-edge digital transfer look.

He’s working on ways to camouflage the seams on round and tube beads and hints that he’s working on a tutorial.

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If you’re not in love with your phone’s camera and editing software and printing, you may not share Jon’s enthusiasm (and mine). To us the mash-up of polymer and computers looks like a big unexplored territory with lots of possibility.

See Jon’s very personal way of mixing media on Etsy, Facebook and his blog.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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