Tips and Tricks

More scrap tweaks

Bonnay on PCDaily

Building on yesterday’s tutorial, we look at how France’s Anne-Sophie Bonnay tweaks her scrap stripes, gouging across them to create a woven pattern.

She enhances the effect by impressing the polymer with a fabric texture.

Bonnay on PCDaily

Anne-Sophie offers more items made from the scrap sheet on her web site.

She even uses the curly gouged out strings, pressing them onto a solid colored sheet to create an abstract pattern. Her imitation tiger’s eye pattern is another riff on this scrap stripe theme.

Scrappy polymer

Hyde on PCDaily

Crisp fall days make colors brights and simple masks funnier. Look at these new pins from Susan Hyde (she’s mostly on Facebook).

A flat oval polymer face with a circle cut out gets her started on completely silly faces. A few dots and strings of clay turn into crazily raised eyebrows, a moustache or a glob of hair. A slice of any old cane will work for eyes.

Don’t forget teeth or a tongue and everybody gets a pair of jump ring earrings. Perfect Halloween favors.

Hyde on PCDaily

Start from scrap

Crothers for PCDaily

As long as we’re going for easy and effective art, check out Debbie Crothers’ scrappy cane tutorial.

I learned a similar version from Carol Blackburn who tames the tutorial and turns the results into tidy stripes and precise geometrics. Any way you handle this tute, it’s a great one to have at your disposal.

Polymer epiphany

Welker on PCDaily

“Do you know the moment at night — right before you fall asleep? That’s when I sometimes get the best ideas. Last night — out of nowhere — that very detailed picture of an earring design popped up right in front of my inner eye….so I had to try it today. They’re in the oven right now,” said Bettina Welker in describing a recent polymer epiphany.

Georg Dinkel caught this photo of Bettina wearing her new creations at the recent Staedtler Fimo Symposium in Paris. Bettina’s cutout shapes are heavily textured and often stacked or moving.

Welker on PCDaily

She calls her series The Place In Between and perhaps this week your best ideas are hiding in some overlooked spot, just waiting for you to relax and accept them.

There’s a free Pin-to-Pendant Converter tutorial on Bettina’s revamped site in case your customers, like hers, want to wear their jewelry in various ways.

You can find more of Bettina’s work and tutorials on Facebook, Pinterest, I-Pernity and Etsy.

Rough treatment for polymer

Sypkova on PCDaily

Olga Sypkova from Kemerovo, Russia plays rough with her African Ethnic beads.

What starts out as cane slices simply applied to clay bases becomes much more interesting once she draws a few lines with circles, scrapes some lines and scratches the surface with sandpaper.

A coat of light acrylic paint accentuates the marks. The rough treatmentt gives an ordinary polymer bead a tribal look with a mysterious past. The beads must have been worn and treasured.

Olga offers you a step-by-step free tutorial. See more of her work on this Russian site (use your translator).

 

 

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you.

    You can find my new book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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