Polymer persistence and style

Lucie Blaauw brings her own voice to each class on PolymerClayDaily.com

The Netherlands’ Lucie Blaauw has taken classes from an impressive list of polymer artists. This recent necklace and earrings set is from a Nikolina Otrzan tutorial.

If you click through Lucie’s Instagram photos you’ll see her style change and her techniques improve as she continues to explore. Her works have become bolder and more dramatic and she injects what she creates with her own voice, no matter whose methods she’s trying.

Best of all, she finishes a piece in each workshop so she can track her progress. Most of us have a drawer full of abandoned efforts. You’ll like her style and love her persistence.

Transitions smooth the look


Marina Rios smooths the look with vintage and handmade spacers on PolymerClayDaily.com

This gorgeous chunky collar from Chicago’s Marina Rios (fancifuldevices) includes thirty-one handmade polymer clay beads with textures, pits, facets, and inclusions in a soft array of greens and pinks graduated in size from large to small.

To ensure a smooth visual transition between beads Marina created special spacers including vintage rhinestone rings and gemstone rondelles. The necklace is adjustable from 19 to 21 inches.

As I composed this post, her lovely spring-like necklace sold on Etsy but have a look anyway.

Marina shares some of her methods in tutorials. If you’re thinking about making faceted beads, review her free step-by-steps here on Instagram.

 

A flock of beads

Rebecca Watkins' flock of bird beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

Rebecca Watkins turns bright beads into cheery birds. They’re 2-inches long from beak to tail and she whitewashed the newest batch to give them more flutter.

Rebecca is an experimenter and you can easily spend more time than you intended reading about the methods she’s come up with for embossing and metallics and etching and more.

Rebecca Watkins' flock of bird beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

She shares all the details (lots of videos) of her late night adventures in polymer. Track her down on her blog and Facebook and Etsy.

Staying flexible

Tucson’s Meg Newberg (polymerclayworkshop) loves devising low tech/high results canes. Her followers find Meg’s instructions easy to follow as she builds precise patterns from simple rolls, blends and stacks. Following her steps is simple, very rewarding and great for building your skills.

The inmates in the ORW class are Meg’s biggest fans because no special tools or exotic ingredients are required to produce stunning results.

Her videos have a large and growing following on Facebook. She sells her tutorials and canes on Etsy as well as by subscription.

Here Meg shows a polymer hex-a-flex. Maybe in high school you sent secret notes to friends using a similar paper trick.

If you’re interested in more secret notes, join the StudioMojo group that looks behind the scenes on Saturday mornings. 

Dizzying patterns in polymer

Newberg on PCDaily

Sometimes we polymer artists just want to sit and admire the work that goes into a series of canes like this lovely black and white grouping from Meg Newberg. And she doesn’t extrude!

Meg has a brain made for caning. She knows how to break the process down into bite-sized pieces that she shares in monthly tutorials. Take a look on Etsy, Facebook and her site.

Breathe in and let your eyes dance around the patterns. Feel better?

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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