Monday masks


How have I overlooked the Detroit guild’s Dorothy Greynolds’ pages? Those picture album pages are wonderful web starts for polymer artists who are otherwise leery of web sites….but it’s harder to find them.

Dorothy shapes these masks over the backs of teaspoons and she displays a wonderful series of characters with broad hints of her graphic arts background. Lots of pictures here. Lots of distractions for a Monday.

Joie de vivre

This site says fun in any language and it’s Friday, for heaven’s sake. What better day to take a look at what French artist Chris Lajoinie is doing with polymer clay?

The site navigation is working a little strangely on my computer and I’m not quite sure what I’m looking at…fibers and crystals and polymer clay. The translation software wasn’t much help.

But who cares? It’s a visual party. We should all try working with such gay abandon from time to time. Thanks, again, to Susan Rose for the tip.

Clayville

If you’re studying artists’ websites and contemplating one for yourself, take a look at how Anita Winthrop of the Clayville California guild has organized hers. In my day job I look at lots of sites and I can’t help but admire ones that are well thought out. Now let me take off my web hat and put on my polymer cap.

Her face cane demo is terrific. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen such intricate face caning. Overall her work makes me happy. Anita is a throwback to the early days of polymer when caning was king and I’m thrilled to see that this kind of work is still alive and well. Thanks to Victoria James for the link.

Exploration

Florida’s Barbara Desrosiers also explores God and nature using polymer. "My venture into mixed media began simply, with small wings formed of polymer clay. Working the clay frequently gives rise to the beginnings of an image," she says.

Barbara finds that mixed media offers a greater freedom than a single medium. She often uses polymer and adds wire, stones, gilding or bells for dimension.

Her site shows her work in other media and frequently she merges her processes.

Barbara quotes poet Robert Creeley, “…art is a gate, not a product.”

The tip comes from Susan Rose.

Icons

Nancy Preston has long been a student of belief systems. After years of reading, she abandoned her books and started building her own vocabulary of images in her artwork. The resulting collages of paper, polymer clay, beads, metal leaf and other materials show her broad interests (from Madonas to Bodhisattvas) and considerable talent.

Nancy is an art school graduate and special needs art teacher in Cortland, New York. She also teaches polymer clay classes. See the class list on her site. Another thanks to Susan Rose for the find.

Canadian Clay

Montreal’s Sophie Dowse "hairwrapped" her way through California in 1999 and realized she could make quite a life for herself through her beads. And so she has.

Her pieces range from bright and simple to dense and complex. The extensive hair wrapping training helped her develop some dynamite weaving skills.

Her site is bright and inviting and her work is full of energy. Who but Susan Rose could find such a new talent? Thanks!

Polymer Books

Chicago’s Geraldine Newfry is crazy for books and polymer and collage. It all totals up to some wonderful artwork. I won’t pretend to understand how she does the binding but it’s impressive and quite nicely explained in this series of pictures.

Read more about her work and her classes on her web site. And as a bonus there are some pictures of her studio (I love to look).

Robin Johnston unearthed this web treasure! Thanks!

Not your mother’s earrings

The construction and colors of Susan Samitz’ earrings and necklaces are a wonderful departure from the norm. Very Jetsons. Very retro. Vermonter Susan says she’s been working in polymer clay since 1988 and she was pointed out to me by the ever-vigilant, super-googler Susan Rose.

Both Susans are great finds.

This feels like a good recovery from yesterday’s blunder. Several of you assure me that David Urso does indeed use resin to fabricate his jewelry. My mistake. Still, his pieces are lovely to look at…and could be made using polymer clay. Thanks for the clarification.

Sounds good

David Urso has eluded my radar by using "hand tinted resin" to describe his work. Correct me if I’ve been led astray but I believe what we have here is polymer clay. And nice polymer clay it is.

I admire how artists cleverly use words to elevate their work. In fact I envy their ability to make me wonder if I’ve misunderstood something. "Isn’t this polymer clay?" I ask myself sheepishly. I have to stop and think….and that’s the point, isn’t it? It’s not exactly easy to make something named "fimo" sound hifalutin.

Ultimately it’s the work, not the medium, that speaks the loudest. The trick is to force us to look closely at the work and Urso’s done that.

Kitsch

I’m a sucker for polymer covered Bic pens. I can’t explain it. They’re so kitsch, so basic yet when I see ones that are particularly well done like these from Karen Ottenbreit I can’t resist.

By the way…there’s now a search form on PCDaily to make finding artists easier…and the comment form has been repaired.

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