Sand-filled scrap polymer

Sand provides structure  for Claire Wallis-Dovey's pinch pot on PolymerClayDaily.com

UK’s Claire Wallis-Dovey joined the pinch pot challenge over at the Facebook Polymer Clay Success group with this marbled entry. She used scrap Kato clay to create her bowl shape.

She gently folded the bowl’s excess clay over to form the top surface and left the pot opening raw to add to its rugged look.

Then Claire poured sand into the hole and added a trickle of water to firm the sand. The wet sand allowed Claire to roll the top flat. The sand also kept the flat area from collapsing during curing. She just poured the sand out after it cooled.

Tuck Claire’s idea away for your next bowl.

How color controls the composition

Rocky Antonio small ring dish contains big colors and textures on PolymerClayDaily.com

Watching Australia’s Rocky Antonio (RockyBeads) assemble her compositions with little bits of clays and canes is soothing and deeply relaxing. She works on small objects (this ring dish is one of her larger items).

With judicious use of color and attention to placement, she keeps her small items from becoming too sweet or insignificant.

The muted purple background of this shallow dish holds all the bright colors together and the dimension adds interest. Watch her paint on polymer on Facebook or work with a needle tool on Instagram.

Rocky’s Matryoshka dolls from 2012  on PCD still tickle me (she built them on lockets).

Polymer mosaic entry

Bobbi Fraser Davis enters a local exhibit with her tiger lilies on PolymerClayDaily.com

Kentucky’s Bobbi Fraser Davis finished this lovely entry for the Louisville Artisan Guild Annual Exhibit. She shows a grouping of tiger lilies in pinks and rose colors mosaicked on a 5.5″ square shallow polymer dish in rusts and tans.

It’s time for guild shows and fair exhibits. Go ahead, jump in with your work.

A colorful Monday mystery

Monday is delivered on colorful dishes from fimo.passion.vb on PolymerClayDaily.com

This shallow polymer bowl and plate bring together hot colors, soothing shapes, and perfect patterns. The white edge on the bowl shows itself delicately.

Though it’s hard to tell from the photo, it seems as if the pine needles on the plate are raised…perhaps a Sutton slice.

What I can’t tell you is who the artist is other than Fimo.passion.vb who writes in French. Another Mystery Monday post.

Nailed it!

Christine Kaczmarek shows how metallic oxides like polymer on PolymerClayDaily

Florida’s Christine Kaczmarek dazzled us in the bowl swap with her sparkling 4 1/2″ round shallow swirl bowls. Those of us who don’t keep up with the latest nail treatments couldn’t figure out how she’d achieved such sheen and sparkle. See more on Christine’s Instagram.

Lumiere Lusters and Born Pretty powders are her favorites. Many other metallic oxide powders used in the nail trade are available online. These powders almost jump onto wet nail polish and they are equally attracted to polymer clay. Glass artists use them too.

The fine powders are tricky to work with. Sneezing, heavy breathing, and ceiling fans will make them take flight. But once you get the hang of it, they’re immense fun.

Christine gave us a demo of both the powders and how to construct this swirl pattern. I’m staying up late to edit it into a video for StudioMojo. If you want to know the rest of this shiny story, join us for the weekly update every Saturday morning. 

Bowl morph

Linda Loew begins with a bowl that becomes a pendant on PolymerClayDaily

What started out as a small bowl by Baltimore’s Linda Loew became a layered, moody pendant.

A photo transfer of a man stares off into the distance from the second layer topped by a multicolored oval frame on top.

Linda Loew begins with a bowl that becomes a pendant on PolymerClayDaily

Turns out that this bowl wanted to be a pendant.

Just because you’ve made a bowl doesn’t mean it can’t morph into something else. See more on Instagram.

 

Colors from another hemisphere

Heidi Helyard brings us warm vibes from down under on PolymerClayDaily.com

Enough with the cold weather already! For those of you in my frigid hemisphere, here’s something different from Australia’s Heidi Helyard. It’s summer there.

Heidi unleashes hot colors, streaking them across this textured bowl. I feel better already.

If you need more warmth and frivolity, go find her on Instagram and shop in her store.

And then if you still need something to keep you snuggly, join us over on StudioMojo. On Saturday morning we dish about what’s happening and dream up new designs while we warm up our clay and wake up our mojos. It’s fun! Come out and play. 

Room for mementos

Laurel Swetnam swaps her footed bowls on PolymerClayDaily.com

These sweet little footed polymer bowls from Portland’s Laurel Swetnam were part of an annual swap. Luscious palette with a hint of northwest patterning.

Who doesn’t have room on a windowsill or dresser for one little memento?

Laurel Swetnam swaps her footed bowls on PolymerClayDaily.com

This year we have only the office phone and a rationed amount of bandwidth on the network but you probably won’t mind short posts, will you?

 

Welcoming the familiar

Cynthia Tinapple finds comfort in a bright striped inlaid bowl on PolymerClayDaily.com

I hesitate to feature my own work but when I run out of research time, it’s the best option. Here’s the 11″ diameter bowl I inlaid last week.

I was happy to get back to my easy stripes at the Virginia conference. Rather than fight against doing the “same old, same old” I welcomed the ease of the familiar. And I had Lindly Haunani nearby to give me color guidance.

I laid narrow strips of veneer into a shallow groove in the spalted maple bowl turned by my husband, Blair Davis. There’s something comforting in knowing that the bowl is made from the tree across the street. “Spalted” is a fancy word for rotted and the tree had to go. You can see a few in-process shots on my Instagram.

Now I can get to composing this week’s Saturday newsletter and gathering up the last tidbits that surfaced at the end of Shrine Mont. Just as we were packing up, people were sharing their “one-last-thing.” And there was a sudden spring crop of tutorials online this week. Join us over at StudioMojo for the scoop.