Transforming canes

Newberg on PCDaily

Meg Newbergs’ transforming cane shifts colors like a treasured and worn carpet. What’s one cane looks like many.

It’s difficult to comprehend how the simple canes she constructs can reduce to be so complex. She’s got a great grasp of geometry and she sends out pages of pictures and explanations of a new idea each month.

If you enjoy caning, her monthly subscription is a good deal. This transforming cane is August’s lesson.

Newberg on PCDaily

Meg allows me to teach some of her designs to inmates who are delighted each time they follow her clear instructions. Not many tools are required and even the newest caners can experience success. Here she is on her site and Etsy.

Fish and waves

Shum on PCDaily

Victoria’s Wanda Shum entered this dimensional Fish & Waves polymer-over-glass vase into the Sooke Fine Arts show that runs from now until August 1. The show is Vancouver Island’s longest-running juried fine art show and the island’s premier summer arts event.

Over her 18 years working with polymer Wanda has become expert at caning, often pushing canes from 2D slices to 3D sculptures and jewelry. Read about her on her website and then hop over to her Instagram page to see more of her collection.

You won’t want to miss Wanda’s signature cane and her alphabet canes. She offers unusual stainless steel and polymer chopsticks on her Etsy site. You’ll also find her on Facebook and Pinterest.

 

 

Tickled by feathers

Hart on PCDaily

Looks like a matchy Monday, doesn’t it? This feather cane from Deb Hart of Texas comes in bright blues and greens that look good on PCD.

Deb’s an expert at feather canes and you’ll see them in most every color on her Facebook page, Pinterest board, and Instagram.

She sells her feathers as raw canes and uses them in her finished southwest jewelry designs that you can see on Etsy and learn about on CraftArtEdu. Deb is someone to follow if feathers tickle your fancy.

Where the blues lead us

Mills on PCDaily

Few things can make a polymer artist more jealous than someone else’s neat stash of luscious canes. Libby Mills adds heaps of vision, skill and focus into one tidy box of blues group canes.

Then she shows us her next step, slices assembled into a sheet of veneer with some solid colors plus black and white stripes added to balance the mix.

Mills on PCDaily

She says beads are next but this is plenty for my eyes to absorb for now. To see where the blues take Libby, check FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

Wearing ornaments

beuting_necklace

We haven’t visited Netherlands’ Patricia Beuting since last year’s holiday season. Her big beads are richly colored and heavily encrusted with cane slices. They look like they belong on a velvet holiday dress.

This one is part of Patricia’s Color Your Life series of necklaces that require a bold, color-loving wearers.

Study how she applies slices of stripes and flowers on solid backgrounds to make textured pattern combinations. There’s more to see on Flickr, Facebook and Patricia’s site.

Polymer pansies

Dwyer on PCDaily

Maine’s Jayne Dwyer has jump on spring with this big and complex pansy cane. If you’ve ever grappled with a big cane, you’ll be impressed by what Jayne has achieved – complicated shading and graduated, textured colors everywhere. We’ll have to check back to see what she makes of it.

Dwyer on PCDaily

Jayne thinks in both a painterly and a 3D way which can be downright tricky. The canes are very clever puzzles.

Go through her Paper Moon Jewelry Facebook page and Pinterest boards to see how she uses slices of reduced canes. She translates her Spring fever into polymer canes just in time for St. Patrick’s Day!

Butterfly booth bush

Shum on PCDaily

Wanda Shum’s butterfly brooches alight gracefully in her booth on a round potted bush. The spring scene invites shoppers in for a closer look. A Vancouver artist, Wanda is selling her wares at a Toronto wholesale show this week.

Shum on PCDaily

It’s easiest to understand how she sketches and builds her butterfly canes by looking at her Facebook photos. You’ll also find her collections of work on Pinterest and Flickr.

Wanda’s colors are hot and her bugs and butterflies add a welcome dash of color on a cold day full of white snow.

2014 Top Five

Arden on PCDaily

PCD’s 2014 annual report shows that readers were very curious about hollow polymer forms. Here are your five favorites:

The top attention-getting post for the year was Kim Arden’s lush summer design. She layered translucent circles and leaf shaped slices over a scrap clay striped base.

There is no denying that Kim is an attention-grabber in everything she does. On Facebook she chronicles one outrageous antic after another alongside eye-catching polymer designs. Look at her latest cat cane.

My thanks to every one of the million and a half visitors who stopped by for a look at the latest development in polymer this year. Please visit often in 2015. Happy New Year!

Polymer sliced for the holidays

Beuting on PCDaily

The snow outside had me looking for holiday designs. I got as far as these beads from Patricia Beuting. They fit the bill. Ethnic meets bohemian meets Christmas.

Patricia’s Pinterest bohemian board will show you that in her art she dreams of Africa, Morocco, and exotic places beyond the Netherlands where she teaches primary school.

Beuting on PCDaily

For her second festive necklace, Patricia cut old canes into thick slices with a ripple blade for an entirely different effect from the patterns. (Here’s Sculpey’s explanation.)

The cross-cut slices expose layers of colors that are curled around to make big hole beads accented with a few solid rounds.

Get better acquainted with Patricia on Facebook and on Flickr.

 

Blurry polymer

Jorre de St Jorre on PCDaily

No need to wipe your screen or clean your glasses. It’s not you. Polymer has gotten blurry.

There’s Wendy Jorre de St Jorre and her Hedges cane that’s a pointellist’s rendition of Australian trees and bushes, the 45th cane in her weekly series. This one started at 4 inches square.

Read the excellent interview on Blue Bottle Tree and you’ll understand her intensity. Wendy’s cane designs have become more impressionistic as they’ve gotten more complex. Prepare to be awed by her canes on Flickr, Pinterest and Facebook.

Van Alphen on PCDaily

Then the UK’s Cate van Alphen (Fulgorine) put out what she’s calling her Spectrum beads with vibrant colors that move like an oil slick. They’re made with Fimo’s True Colors. The first batch was intriguing and successive offerings are more mystifying. Look at Flickr and Facebook.

Used to be we wanted crisp edges on our polymer designs and now we’ve gone all soft and blurry. Figuring out how is going to be fun.

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