Fiona Herbst creates a contemporary design for the holidays on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ireland’s Fiona Herbst has added this simple sophisticated pendant design to her holiday lineup. Colors like these are easy to wear with almost anything.

She knew she was onto something when the pendant was snatched up before it made it online.

Browse through Fiona’s Instagram to see what other crowd-pleasers she’s creating for the season.

Over at StudioMojo, we’ll be looking at more holiday offerings and I’ll share what my trainwreck of a week taught me.

Polymer ornithology

Marni Southam has turned a love of birds into an earring business on PolymerClayDaily.com

Australia’s Marni Southam (Oleander Avenue) has an amazing ability to turn every scrap of polymer into a bird.

Her alchemy is mesmerizing. A circle, some stripes, a triangle, more bits of color and a bird emerges. How does she do that?

Marni Southam has turned a love of birds into an earring business on PolymerClayDaily.com

Combine her knowledge of birds with a love of earrings and you’ve got a thriving business.

The story of her Blue Fairy Wrens is touching and clearly explains her obsession with ornithology. I can’t help but think of Ohio illustrator Charlie Harper whom I met when I worked for Ohio’s Department of Natural Resources.

Pin up polymer

Bonnie Bishoff pins up potential pieces for her newest series on PolymerClayDaily.com

As one reader commented, Maine’s Bonnie Bishoff’s pinned up work-in-progress has a little voodoo edge to it.

But mostly it’s a wonderfully smart way to figure out how a neck piece hugs the body. In what direction does your eye travel? Where do your eyes stop? What’s balanced? What’s not?

See how Bonnie has solved these riddles with the finished necklaces on her Instagram and website.

Zazu zips through a geometric collection


Zazu zips through cutting and arranging layers to create a collection on PolymerClayDaily

The rhythm of cutting and replacing pieces of clay, especially at high speed, makes this process look simple and satisfying.

Watch Spain’s Zazu cut and swap layers of stripes and solids.

Using only a blade and some geometric cutters she reassembles pieces of striped canes and solids into an entire collection of jewelry.

There are days that whiz by when things go as swimmingly as this. Let’s hope today is one of them.

Keeping it simple

Gosia Moiko keeps her earrings simple and silkscreened on PolymerClayDaily.com

I’m still stuck on the simple stuff.

Yesterday the theme was circles, today we take in squares from Poland’s Moiko that have been silk screened, cut out, and plopped on top of each other.

Moiko is owned by Malgorzata Wawrzynczak who offers a wide selection of silk screens that have been designed specifically for polymer clay.

She excels at simple geometric combinations that feel fresh and fashionable. Here she is on Instagram.

No translation necessary

Wakana Kobayashi builds quilted canes Japanese style on PolymerClayDaily.com

Tokyo’s Wakana Kobayashi (WakkaClay) creates crisp geometric patterns for earrings and hair accessories.

Though the online translation is rough, it’s obvious that she speaks polymer fluently.

In her work-in-progress shots on Instagram, the components appear to be extruded but they may be rolled carefully by hand. Something to aspire to on a Monday.

When you need to feel safe

Sometimes a neat, tidy, geometric polymer pendant hits the spot.

Spain’s Zazu Polymer Clay Jewelry convinces us that everything is under control when the news and the weather tell us anything but that.

If you need safety and predictability, see how Murcia Aranzazu (Zazu) creates sleek, bright, controlled jewelry on her website, Facebook and Instagram. Her Pinterest page lets you roam around in her inspirations.

Lured by complexity

Learn complex geometry from Jana Honnerova on PolymerClayDaily.com
Learn complex geometry from Jana Honnerova on PolymerClayDaily.com

Czech Republic’s Jana Hannarova can’t stay away from complex, layered, lustrous patterns. When she’s really excited she challenges herself with hollow forms and translucent clays that reveal even more complexity. The reticulated necklace here can be worn three different ways.

It’s a good thing it’s Friday because you may need some time to examine Jana’s Flickr, Instagram and Facebook galleries of work. Join her Facebook workshop group if you’re interested in the online workshops she will offer this year.

On Saturday you can join us over at StudioMojo where we suck up inspiration from all kinds of concepts, tools and eye candy that floated by during the week. Your year is off to a great start and StudioMojo keeps the momentum going. Try it!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...