NYTimes: Polymer for anxiety

Rebecca Ackermann cures anxiety on PolymerClayDaily.com

In Thursday’s NYTimes, San Francisco’s Rebecca Ackermann reinforces the joys of polymer in her article called, I Cured My Pandemic Anxiety by Making Tiny Food Out of Clay.

She watched friends extract comfort from cooking and tried that. “It was just another thing I was failing at,” she says. She moved on to tie-dye, yoga, face painting, and more. One day she bought some polymer clay to pass the hours with her daughter.

You know the rest of the story!

“My daughter and I still do clay together when she’s in the mood, but she gets angry if her results don’t look like mine. So I’m working to teach her the word “experiment” and the notion that each time she tries, the trying makes her better. It’s a lesson I’m still learning at the end of every strange, horrible, or hopeful day in quarantine when I sit down with my clay and my little tools and I try again to make one small piece of the world just right.” Rebecca is on Instagram and Twitter.

Thanks to Seth Savarick (still in Chicago, moving to Palm Springs) for pointing PCD to this article. If you’re ready to get more newsy bits in one weekly digest, sign up for Saturday’s StudioMojo. 

There’s no place like home

Leslie Blackford offers classes to put you in touch with Oz on PolymerClayDaily.com

Kentucky’s Leslie Blackford (MoodyWoods) wanted to make clear that she wasn’t planning for the good witch in her new Oz series to look like me. It just happened…and I’m honored.

Leslie’s been offering online classes and everyone who joined in has been delighted at the creatures that fly off their fingers. There’s still time to jump into the Oz group by messaging Leslie.

Don’t we all wish we had a wand right now? Leslie shows you how to find yours. She has a special gift for putting you in touch with your inner Oz character.

Preserving a world

Celine Roumagnac captures her world on PolymerClayDaily.com

Like France’s Celine Roumagnac (untempspourrever), I got lost in my own world and nearly forgot to post some Friday fun.

Celine captures a charming hilly, green world of flowers, trees, and houses. She places it under a glass dome so that nothing ever changes. Idyllic!

I videotaped my chat with Genevieve Williamson and was so busy editing that I got lost in the world of StudioMojo which drops into your email every Saturday. Join us!

Shower your Monday with fantasy

Serena Ghidoni showers your Monday with fantasy on PolymerClayDaily.com

Italy’s Serena Ghidoni (mondoinundito) showers your Monday with a handful of polymer nymphs, mermaids, and fairies.

Mondoinundito means “world in a finger”. Serena says she wants to convey the idea that behind small things there is a huge and beautiful world that deserves to be discovered.

Take a closer look at the fine details she sculpts into these graceful and fanciful shapes. Her Instagram leads you to her Facebook and sales sites.

It takes a village


Chris Baird's home sweet homes from scrap on PolymerClayDaily.com

Minneapolis’ Chris Baird came to the rescue when I couldn’t locate Tuesday’s artist (Nathalie Sgard).

Of course, I looked at Chris’ Etsy page and found her on Facebook and was smitten by her little houses and villages made of scrap. They’re patched and pieced together in the most nostalgic and charming ways.

I’m away from home at Clayathon this weekend. It’s a big event with lots to inspire you. Join us at StudioMojo for a look over the shoulders of some of our most amazing polymer artists at work. 

A bird in the hand

Anna Oriana offers quick tutorials to help your creativity take flight on PolymerClayDaily

Russia’s Anna Oriana quickly creates a bright beautiful bird on Instagram.

Anna’s videos of miniatures are wildly popular and she shows impressive skill in her tiny artworks and her YouTube tutorials. For a quick shot of inspiration and color, try her tutorials.

Stripes will make winter warmer

Katie Way turns stripes into polymer bargello on PolymerClayDaily.com

Oklahoma’s Katie Way made stripes in her own distinctive palette using Carol Blackburn’s clever instructions. By cutting slim slices and incrementally jogging their positions, Katie re-assembled her stripes into a veneer that looks like a miniature afghan. It could provide warmth in some dollhouse this winter.

The result is so alluring she probably hates to cut it to make her holiday jewelry line. Go to Katie’s Instagram to see what her veneer becomes.

Over at StudioMojo this weekend, I’m taking a deep breath and revealing the subject of a new book I’m writing. I won’t be alone. There are several other polymer artists who are writing this fall. Join us to read about the bumper crop of books and the trends that have started a buzz.

Culture in clay

Rashmi's miniature portraits speak clearly on PolymerClayDaily.com

This polymer sculpture from India’s Aura Figurines (via Ginger Davis Allman) has a liveliness that’s unusual and compelling… and a little mysterious.

We only know the artist as Rashmi on Twitter. If you discover more about Rashmi, let me know.

While we know we’re a worldwide community, it’s still fascinating when you see how culture and spirit come through the clay. How does she do that?

Friday is StudioMojo writing day so I’ll leave this mystery in your good hands so I can concentrate on organizing the intriguing topics and tidbits that float by us each week. There’s always much to uncover and bring to you. Join us at StudioMojo.org for all the weekend juicy bits.

How does polymer stack up?

Hyperreal miniature Bremen Town Musicians from Kerri Pajuti on PolymerClayDailly

Oregon’s Kerri Pajutee’s extraordinary miniature mixed media sculptures popped up on a submissions call to the polymer community.

This piece is her version of the Bremen Town Musicians based on a fairy tale. Kerri created it for last fall’s Miniature Masterworks show.

Kerri is motivated by the desire to replicate the beauty and energy of animals in 1:12 scale. She developed a technique to combine polymer clay with layers of natural fibers: wool, alpaca, cashmere, and silk. The best place to see her process is on Facebook.

IPCA is looking to feature polymer hyperrealism in their upcoming publication. They used Kerri’s works as an example. The deadline is April 21 and an email to editor@theipca.org will put you in the running.