Stories in polymer

Helena Bogosian pares holidays down to their essence on PolymerClayDaily

New Jersey’s Helena Bogosian celebrates Hanukkah in polymer and illustrates how families of all faiths gather for the holidays.

Simple flat circle heads with a dot for eyes and the slightest dashes for other features still read very powerfully and clearly. We know those curly beards and hair! We recognize those foods and the menorah. Helena pares everything down to its wonderful essence.

Alberta Einstein

Anita Benhan interprets Alberta Einstein in clay on PolymerClayDaily.com

Was Ohio’s Anita Behnen thinking of me when she designed her new line of mixed-media sculptures? White hair, dots?

Turns out she calls her new imp Alberta Einstein and the story is that learning new math has turned her hair white. (Anita’s creatures all have stories.) It’s not about me at all.

PCD shows you the latest…you won’t find this on Anita’s FB because I’m at my first in-person event since, well you know when. I forgot how energizing and exciting and exhausting these events are. That hasn’t changed.

And hats off to the new people who jumped into this group (organized by Ron Lehocky and his group). It’s brave to jump into a group of buddies who have known each other for years. Hats off to Carla Bull, Priscilla Andrews, Paula Kennedy, and Lynn Abernathy who took the first-time plunge into the Kentucky event. Being creative takes courage, jump into a group in your area.


StudioMojo will be chock full of pictures of cool, crazy, new polymer ideas from Texas to Nebraska from brave artists who ventured vaccinated into the heart of Kentucky to get their groove back. Sign up now to get tomorrow’s edition.

Dog lover polymer

Retired RN Lea Gordiner focuses on mixed media creatures on PolymerClayDaily.com

Oregon’s Lea Gordiner says, “My recent fantasy is a combination of birds and animals with human features. They are meant to be silly, fun, playful, nonsensical…really. Seen any birds lately with nostrils and lips let alone shoes?”

If the holiday hoopla has you in a dither, you’ll be set straight by a wander through Lea’s website and her Instagram. She has shifted to finely finished polymer boxes as well.

Lea’s Portland guild mate Laurel Swetnam turned her in. We thought it only right that Lea has a PCD post among her presents this year. Thanks for making us smile.

Justice for all polymer

Laurie Mika marks the importance of Justice for All on PolymerClayDaily.com

This 9″x12″ tarot card Justice from California’s Laurie Mika suits the serious mood today.

Laurie assembles her sumptuous mixed media mosaics from polymer, jewelry parts, and found items. The phrase from the pledge of allegiance and other words and imagery are stamped in. Rich colors and golden highlights add gravitas.

“My art continues to be influenced by the world we are living in. This is a way for me to mark this historic time in our lives,” she says. She hopes her art brings some solace.

See more of Laurie’s mosaics, reliquaries, and jewelry on Etsy.

 

Women in power

Art at its best is a conversation between the artist and the viewer. For instance, take a look at the polymer figure in this glass and polymer mosaic called, She Persists – Women in Power by Debbie Maier Jacknin of Pittsburgh.

What is she saying? What is her story? What more can we learn by looking at all of the elements?

On her blog, Debbie tells of her interest in the history of Pittsburgh and of Native Americans, including that of the 18th-century leader, Queen Aliquippa.

T. Chalke wrote in 1706 that Aliquippa “…was an empress; and they gave much heed to what she said among them.”

Debbie says, “Let this sink in. While European women were not able to vote or own property, the Native woman was often the leader in her community and held in high esteem!”

Art can be much more than a pretty picture. Thank you, Debbie, for the timely conversation.

Blog post by Debbie Jacknin and Maureen Carlson

Polymer that snarls for you

Heather Tinkham's mixed media sister snarls when you can't on PolymerClayDaily

Bazhie, of the Support Squad, is one of 15 mixed-media figures created by Minneapolis artist Heather Tinkham for a grouping that she calls the Sister Posse.

Take a look, and then a second, deeper look, at Bazhie’s expressive, mysterious face. Yes, it’s polymer, as are the accent pieces that adorn her head and serve as her feet. At 20 inches (50.8 cm) tall, she is an imposing figure.

Heather also creates jewelry, but her interest in art-making as a force for introspection and healing is especially evident in her figurative work.

Each of the Sister Posse members has a story that represents one of the amazing gifts we bring to each other, from the strength to stand firm to the need to grieve and heal from the storms of life. Bazhie’s story is about the Gnarly Snarls of Shoulds, which is a tricky job at the best of times. Heather says “Not to worry, Bazhie’s got this Gnarly Snarl for you. Go back to doing what you can. Things will be fine.”

Heather has wisely taken advantage of the photogenic quality of the Sister Posse and offers them as inspiration cards for journaling, reflection, greeting card enclosures, or as reminders of intention. Smart move, Heather!   Posted by Maureen Carlson

Polymer evolution/revolution from India

Radhika Sadhika sketches in polymer and wire on PolymerClayDaily.com

India’s Radhika Sadhika (radicalsbyradhikasadhika) illustrates the flow of line transforming into shapes that are aesthetically different in every piece.

She combines clay and wire in ways that make them look like sketches. Brass wires connect clay designs and turn them into minimalist wearable line drawings.

You’ll only find a cryptic bit about Radhika on Instagram. You have to DM her for sales information on her intriguing pieces. Her links lead you to a Google Photo gallery of her work. The path to her works mirrors the Evolution/Revolution theme of her work.

Read about her on Arts Thread.

Colorful unraveling

Alessia Bodini explores euphoria and discouragement on PolymerClayDaily.com

This is the final 8″x8″ wood panel in a series of four from Italy’s Alessia Bodini.

The mixed-media grouping is called “The Genesis of Euphoria and Discouragement: Circular Work in Four Squares “.

Alessia Bodini explores euphoria and discouragement on PolymerClayDaily.com

In the final square, the extruded strips come undone, unraveled…but in a joyous, freed way. The surfaces of the extruded strips are shaved to reveal more depth of color.

It’s kinda like our lives right now….coming unraveled in what we hope are interesting ways. If you search Alessia on PCD you can track some of the unusual, quirky ways she plays with clay. Here she is on Instagram.