Justice for all polymer

Laurie Mika marks the importance of Justice for All on PolymerClayDaily.com

This 9″x12″ tarot card Justice from California’s Laurie Mika suits the serious mood today.

Laurie assembles her sumptuous mixed media mosaics from polymer, jewelry parts, and found items. The phrase from the pledge of allegiance and other words and imagery are stamped in. Rich colors and golden highlights add gravitas.

“My art continues to be influenced by the world we are living in. This is a way for me to mark this historic time in our lives,” she says. She hopes her art brings some solace.

See more of Laurie’s mosaics, reliquaries, and jewelry on Etsy.

 

Women in power

Art at its best is a conversation between the artist and the viewer. For instance, take a look at the polymer figure in this glass and polymer mosaic called, She Persists – Women in Power by Debbie Maier Jacknin of Pittsburgh.

What is she saying? What is her story? What more can we learn by looking at all of the elements?

On her blog, Debbie tells of her interest in the history of Pittsburgh and of Native Americans, including that of the 18th-century leader, Queen Aliquippa.

T. Chalke wrote in 1706 that Aliquippa “…was an empress; and they gave much heed to what she said among them.”

Debbie says, “Let this sink in. While European women were not able to vote or own property, the Native woman was often the leader in her community and held in high esteem!”

Art can be much more than a pretty picture. Thank you, Debbie, for the timely conversation.

Blog post by Debbie Jacknin and Maureen Carlson

Polymer that snarls for you

Heather Tinkham's mixed media sister snarls when you can't on PolymerClayDaily

Bazhie, of the Support Squad, is one of 15 mixed-media figures created by Minneapolis artist Heather Tinkham for a grouping that she calls the Sister Posse.

Take a look, and then a second, deeper look, at Bazhie’s expressive, mysterious face. Yes, it’s polymer, as are the accent pieces that adorn her head and serve as her feet. At 20 inches (50.8 cm) tall, she is an imposing figure.

Heather also creates jewelry, but her interest in art-making as a force for introspection and healing is especially evident in her figurative work.

Each of the Sister Posse members has a story that represents one of the amazing gifts we bring to each other, from the strength to stand firm to the need to grieve and heal from the storms of life. Bazhie’s story is about the Gnarly Snarls of Shoulds, which is a tricky job at the best of times. Heather says “Not to worry, Bazhie’s got this Gnarly Snarl for you. Go back to doing what you can. Things will be fine.”

Heather has wisely taken advantage of the photogenic quality of the Sister Posse and offers them as inspiration cards for journaling, reflection, greeting card enclosures, or as reminders of intention. Smart move, Heather!   Posted by Maureen Carlson

Polymer evolution/revolution from India

Radhika Sadhika sketches in polymer and wire on PolymerClayDaily.com

India’s Radhika Sadhika (radicalsbyradhikasadhika) illustrates the flow of line transforming into shapes that are aesthetically different in every piece.

She combines clay and wire in ways that make them look like sketches. Brass wires connect clay designs and turn them into minimalist wearable line drawings.

You’ll only find a cryptic bit about Radhika on Instagram. You have to DM her for sales information on her intriguing pieces. Her links lead you to a Google Photo gallery of her work. The path to her works mirrors the Evolution/Revolution theme of her work.

Read about her on Arts Thread.

Colorful unraveling

Alessia Bodini explores euphoria and discouragement on PolymerClayDaily.com

This is the final 8″x8″ wood panel in a series of four from Italy’s Alessia Bodini.

The mixed-media grouping is called “The Genesis of Euphoria and Discouragement: Circular Work in Four Squares “.

Alessia Bodini explores euphoria and discouragement on PolymerClayDaily.com

In the final square, the extruded strips come undone, unraveled…but in a joyous, freed way. The surfaces of the extruded strips are shaved to reveal more depth of color.

It’s kinda like our lives right now….coming unraveled in what we hope are interesting ways. If you search Alessia on PCD you can track some of the unusual, quirky ways she plays with clay. Here she is on Instagram.

Quirky challenge

Barbara Nalepa's quirky characters enliven a 10-day challenge on PolymerClayDaily.com

Sweden’s Barbara Nalepa was nominated by EvaMarie Törnström to take part in an ad hoc challenge for 10 days.

Barbara Nalepa's quirky characters enliven a 10-day challenge on PolymerClayDaily.com

Barbara’s creatures have a wild and funny demeanor with an unexpected sprinkling of shimmering glitter from what may be low-fire enamel powder on polymer.

Since the challenge specifies that the artists don’t have to explain a thing, it’s hard to determine all that’s going on. Perhaps Barbara will elaborate on her quirky characters later.

More characters roam through her Facebook.

The art you need

Laurie Mika's Corona series shows us the power of art on PolymerClayDaily.com

Yes, we featured Laurie Mika’s Corona series just recently. But I need her works just now.

One friend dies, a neighbor tests positive and moves to hospice, a husband fights cancer. And I’m in Ohio, a state that is behaving responsibly!

Laurie’s art presses all my buttons. Wish us well today.

You may have been skeptical about the effect your polymer art can have. Laurie shows you how powerful it can be.

Polymer packs a punch

Anita Kennerley gets in your face with her polymer message on PolymerClayDaily.com

Georgia’s Anita Kennerley shows how polymer can pack a punch. She calls her 4 1/2″ round piece Rona Rules. Crocheted red dots are tucked in between textured and torn bits of silver clay with a tattooed fist that gets in your face with a message.

What a powerful way to emphasize the number one rule for fighting this virus.

Anita has great spirit and she never pulls her punches. Here she is on Facebook.

What will 2020 look like?

Nadia Elkina points us toward the future of polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Will 2020 polymer look more like Poland’s Nadia Elkina’s mosaic brooch? Dimensional, mixed, polychromatic?

It’s hard to tell which elements are which medium. And who really cares? It’s the overall snap, crackle, and pop that makes this piece compelling. Look even further ahead on IG here.

Join us this weekend over at StudioMojo where we’ll have our eye on new and interesting directions we can expect in polymer 2020. Who can predict? We’re gonna try. Come on over and add your two cents.