Justice for all polymer

Laurie Mika marks the importance of Justice for All on PolymerClayDaily.com

This 9″x12″ tarot card Justice from California’s Laurie Mika suits the serious mood today.

Laurie assembles her sumptuous mixed media mosaics from polymer, jewelry parts, and found items. The phrase from the pledge of allegiance and other words and imagery are stamped in. Rich colors and golden highlights add gravitas.

“My art continues to be influenced by the world we are living in. This is a way for me to mark this historic time in our lives,” she says. She hopes her art brings some solace.

See more of Laurie’s mosaics, reliquaries, and jewelry on Etsy.

 

Women in power

Art at its best is a conversation between the artist and the viewer. For instance, take a look at the polymer figure in this glass and polymer mosaic called, She Persists – Women in Power by Debbie Maier Jacknin of Pittsburgh.

What is she saying? What is her story? What more can we learn by looking at all of the elements?

On her blog, Debbie tells of her interest in the history of Pittsburgh and of Native Americans, including that of the 18th-century leader, Queen Aliquippa.

T. Chalke wrote in 1706 that Aliquippa “…was an empress; and they gave much heed to what she said among them.”

Debbie says, “Let this sink in. While European women were not able to vote or own property, the Native woman was often the leader in her community and held in high esteem!”

Art can be much more than a pretty picture. Thank you, Debbie, for the timely conversation.

Blog post by Debbie Jacknin and Maureen Carlson

Layered leaves

Sabine Speisser's scrap brings her history to this leaf brooch on PolymerClayDaily.com

Australia’s Sabine Spiesser mixes hot color combinations that make visual vibrations on this 3-layer leaf brooch.

Posting in response to one of those 10-day challenges on Facebook, Sabine didn’t add any explanation. The requirement is only that the art is somehow significant to the artist. Viewers can draw their own conclusions.

The mosaic appearance comes from layered scrap. When you use scrap, you bring to a project the color selections and design decisions from your past. Your way of working, your history is embedded and gives the new piece an extra richness.

The three offset layers ripple pleasantly against each other.

Mindful remaking

Doreen Willey rearranges lost scraps into dazzling tiles on PolymerClayDaily

These tiles from California’s Doreen Willey are a dazzling blast from her past. Encouraged by Christi Friesen’s Play Days and driven by bags of scraps that Doreen was anxious to reduce, reuse, and recycle, she jumped into this project with stunning results.

Years of design decisions added up to works with wild variety yet a cohesive, exuberant look and feel. “If you are like me, you probably have a huge stash of stuff you’ve made that’s gone into boxes never to be seen again,” says Doreen.

“I pulled out my boxes, started cutting my stuff up and put it back together in a new way,” she explains. And we’re lucky she did! What an inspiration! Here on Facebook.

Groovy polymer

Deb Hart takes us back to peace and love on PolymerClayDaily
Deb Hart takes us back to peace and love on PolymerClayDaily

Texas’ Deb Hart takes polymer back to its roots with these three hippie-themed tiles.

With regular retreats canceled, Deb is using her free time to indulge her inner flower child and make some class samples for next year’s events.

On her Facebook, you can see her in-process photos as she creates an outline with a string of extruded polymer and positions the main elements. She fills in later with colors and more patterns. The peace theme feels hopeful and right.

 

Puzzling polymer

Ivana Svobodova puzzles her scraps together on PolymerClayDaily

Czech Republic’s  Ivana Svobodová makes a game of collecting all her thin, tiny scraps and then sitting down for a game of assemblage. Nothing goes to waste as she creates a series of puzzled brooches.

The face parts mixed in with all the patterns add an element of surprise and mystery.

Ivana Svobodova puzzles her scraps together on PolymerClayDaily

The art you need

Laurie Mika's Corona series shows us the power of art on PolymerClayDaily.com

Yes, we featured Laurie Mika’s Corona series just recently. But I need her works just now.

One friend dies, a neighbor tests positive and moves to hospice, a husband fights cancer. And I’m in Ohio, a state that is behaving responsibly!

Laurie’s art presses all my buttons. Wish us well today.

You may have been skeptical about the effect your polymer art can have. Laurie shows you how powerful it can be.

Our lady of the pandemic

Laurie Mika loves crowns so the corona figures prominently in her new art on PolymerClayDaily.com

California’s Laurie Mika has created a whole body of new mixed media work that she calls During the Pandemic.

Her polymer mosaic shrines are heavily textured, encrusted with found jewels, and stamped with prayers and sayings.

Laurie is a lover of crowns so coronas figure prominently in her shrines which have names like “Our Lady of the Pandemic” and inscriptions like the Latin “Momento Mori” (remember, we will all die).

“This pause in our lives has been one of reflection, self-discovery, re-evaluating what’s important, and finding new ways of coping,” says Laurie.

Read more about her newest creations in her newsletter and on her Etsy site. Has the pandemic affected your art?

Armed and ready

Cynthia Toops pays homage to the virus in micromosaic on PolymerClayDaily.com

Seattle’s Cynthia Toops pays homage to our current reality with her latest small micromosaic brooch.

Her “Armed and Ready” cowboy wields a yellow tape lasso for 6′ social distancing, a mask, nitrile gloves and sanitizer in holster. He wears a covid brooch instead of a sheriff star.

Cynthia bakes very fine threads of polymer which she embeds in an unbaked layer and cures again. All this in a cast sterling bezel by Chuck Domitrovich.

Over at StudioMojo we’ll thread our way around current events and look at all the creativity this crisis has spawned. Join us!

Easter heirlooms

Deb Hart shows you how to make an heirloom for Easter on PolymerClayDaily.com

Texas’ Deb Hart gets a jump on Easter with her polymer mosaic eggs. Deb has an unusual way of filling in around her central elements and defining the spaces with thin border canes and fine repeating patterns.

No time to make them? Deb offers 50% off her own finished eggs or her tutorials until April 13. (Use promo code Easter2020.) Her workbooks are all 50% off through the end of May while we keep our families safe at home.

You’ll also find Deb’s polymer designs with a southwest flavor on Craftcast and Facebook.