Reverse mosaics from Maine educator Diane Manzi

Teacher Diane Manzi teases us with a basket of reverse mosaic ornaments on PolymerClayDaily

It’s Monday and I really didn’t feel much like trolling through Instagram and Facebook. Maine’s Diane Manzi must have sensed my overload.

She emailed me photos of her reverse mosaic ornaments and switchplates which set off a series of alarm bells that chimed gaily, “We have a winner!” Her ornaments and switchplates have a woven, scrappy, graphic, contemporary look.

What in the world is “reverse mosaic” and will she share her magic? She claims to be a doodler. Tell us more!

Teacher Diane Manzi teases us with a basket of reverse mosaic ornaments on PolymerClayDaily

Photos of the ornaments and switchplates show off her style much better than the little photos on her website. She’s an art educator. Lucky kids to have such a teacher. I’m jealous.

Bravo for Diane bravely sending her work to PCD. Now we want more, more from her. Here she is on Facebook. Let’s coax her out of her shell.

Take time to ponder this trick

Lynn Yuhr makes us believe in magic on PolymerClayDaily.com

My head knows that if you put light to dark next to dark to light you’ll get the sensation of curving dimensional color.

So why does the trick surprise me every time?

Lynn Yuhr shows us how it’s done with her ornaments. Flipped alternating Skinner blends produce the magic.

German artist, Philip Wiegard takes this concept even further and his free tutorials will wow you.

Too much for your brain on a Monday? So sorry. Pour yourself another cuppa.

Out of clay, full of imagination

Kathy Koontz turns scrap into not-so-ugly Christmas sweater ornaments on PolymerClayDaily

Soulth Carolina’s Kathy Koontz (FlowertownOriginals) thanks the pandemic for one of her best sellers this season. Yes, Covid slowed the manufacture and shipping of clay but she didn’t let that stop her as she saw her supplies running low.

Kathy Koontz turns scrap into not-so-ugly Christmas sweater ornaments on PolymerClayDaily

Kathy got creative with her scraps. “Whether it’s old canes being reimagined or unsuccessful veneers that I somehow knew to keep, they both found a place in these Christmas sweater ornaments. So thanks corona virus!” There are a few left on Etsy.

Red fox ornaments

Laurel Swetnam hangs scrap foxes on the tree on PolymerClayDaily.com

Portland’s Laurel Swetnam loves her deep reds and oranges. By this time of year, she’s left with lots of cane ends and leftover veneers.

Not a problem! The patterns and colors play nicely with each other as she pieces them into these charmingly angular fox ornaments. Simple shapes become stunning ornaments.

Home for the holidays

Lindsay Black builds polymer homes and memories on PolymerClayDaily.com

“Home is the memories we make on the inside. The outside is a symbol of those memories,” explains Nashville’s Lindsay Black (oddlyand company).

She specializes in polymer home portraits and she’ll even put up your decorations as she did here.

You can imagine why Lindsay limits her custom homes with their precise details to just a few. She’ll re-open her shop on Etsy in February for next year’s orders.

Polymer Christmas elves

Pete Simpson's imps bring Christmas magic on PolymerClayDaily.com

UK’s Pete Simpson’s Imps and Things can make you a believer in all kinds of fantastical spirits.

Each imp relaxes in a 10cm diameter frosted bauble that’s ready to hang. “He’s completely guaranteed not to misbehave or cause chaos on your tree when you are not looking!” says Pete.

Watch Pete build his faerie folk on Instagram.

PCD viewers have made me a believer in helpful elves. We quickly met our goal of raising funds to purchase an industrial rolling machine for the polymer students at the Ohio Reformatory for Women.

Even better, the exact machine we were looking for appeared on my porch this weekend from a special secret sprite. Get the whole story tomorrow on PCD.

Polymer patchwork creatures

Lisa Gauthier makes a warm and comfy elephant ornament on PolymerClayDaily.com

Connecticut’s Lisa Gauthier will hang this patchwork elephant on the tree in a competition that will benefit the Ronald McDonald House in New Haven.

I’m guessing that the patches are veneers made from scrap canes which Lisa makes look real and comfy.

The SCPCG has pulled out all the stops for this competition and we’ve featured several entries. Their Creatures Great and Small are winners in our book. Congrats to the guild for their outstanding efforts.

Join us over at StudioMojo this Saturday and be inspired by the latest shows and competitions. It’s beginning to look a lot like the holidays!

It’s beginning to look a lot like ornaments

Carole Monahan's birds make easy designs for your tree on PolymerClayDaily.com

This is our second look at the ornaments that the members of the Connecticut guild (SCPCG) created for a decorated tree competition that benefits the Ronald McDonald House in New Haven.

These cardinals from Carole Monahan are lightweight and stylized. The design requires a few simple flat cutouts of textured clay with extra bits for wings, eye, and beak.

Bake the wire hanger right into the clay.  Easy, peasy and there’s still time to make them!

Tres Reyes in polymer

Olga Ayala puts her culture in her art on PolymerClayDaily.com

These Tres Reyesmake up an exotic three kings ornament set from New York’s Olga Ayala.

Olga calls herself a Nuyorican (Puerto Rican New Yorker) who grew up in the heart of Spanish Harlem in New York City.

Influenced by the music and cultures around her, she infuses her polymer works with those same rhythms and colors. Here she is on Facebook.

Feliz Navidad!

This week on Saturday’s StudioMojo we’ll be figuring out how to leave a few breadcrumbs around the studio so that when the holiday hubbub settles down, you will enthusiastically follow them back to your art. 

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