Graham’s polymer watercolors

In these two 8″x10″ polymer clay paintings, Pittsburgh’s Denise Graham says that, “Achieving a watercolor effect was a delightful challenge.”

Denise has been painting with polymer clay for years and was looking for a way to return to her roots as a watercolorist.

Alcohol inks and acrylic paints enhance the overall effect in Summer’s Fruit. In Spring Blossoms, she uses pastels and mica powders to create the subtle background hues.

See additional paintings on her Flickr site and read a bit more about her methods. Thanks to Carol Shelton for the reminder to take another look at this unusual use of polymer.

Tabakman’s robotic polymer

Laura Tabakman’s latest creation contains 10 mechanisms and computerized polymer clay shapes that undulate, grow and spin on a 3’x6′ base.  See the video here.

Her robotic piece, called Flora, resembles a moving Monet and won best of show at the Pittsburgh Technology Council’s exhibition.

Over the past few months Laura’s been developing organic shapes both in her installation art and in her jewelry (as in this “Cascade” necklace) paying special attention to how the pieces move as they’re worn or approached.

The chronological organization of Flickr gives us a snapshot of an artist’s progress and I think it’s safe to say that Laura’s having a growth spurt.

Thanks to Susan Lomuto (DailyArtMuse) for the link. Have an invigorating weekend.

Samsonova’s polymer glows

Click on this polymer clay necklace to see how glow-in-the-dark can be both fun and sophisticated. Elena Samsonova is a Russian-born Connecticut artist who has lately been reviving and updating 60’s psychedelic canes, making them trendy again.

Her Flickr collection shows her recent bright, bold palette. In one departure from color, Elena created white “animal beads” covered with slices of simple line drawing canes (inspired by an Ikea shower curtain) that are incredibly charming.

We last visited her in 2007 when wirewrapping was her focus.

Here’s her blog in English and if you want to see her work-in-progress, visit her Russian site.

Sim’s polymer fights fear

Singapore’s Garie Sim is fighting fear with polymer clay and humor. The illustration at the left shows the H1N1 virus being attacked. If you look closely under our microscope you will see that the attacker is Garie’s polymer creation at the right.

His knife-wielding creatures are called the H1N1PC virus and they shout the battle cry, “Don’t whine, we will take out the swine.”

You might guess that Garie works with children. If you scroll down his blog you’ll see wonderful pictures of his young students standing proudly with their polymer works.

You can understand why Garie is combatting the fear virus with hope and cheer. Thanks to Lindly Haunani for the link.

Petrova’s summer polymer blooms

Russia’s Olga Petrova sent in these links to her polymer and DecoClay work and her flowers hit the spot for a lovely summer’s Tuesday.

DecoClay is an air dry polymer clay most popular beyond the US borders, particularly in Japan, Thailand and Russia.

Put down that cane, stop rolling that bead or sculpting that doll and take a look at these lovely bright blooms from Russia. Olga’s site translates nicely and gives you a look into the vibrant polymer community there.

If you have some time and want the full tour, click on some of her links to other clay sites.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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