The Synergy from hell

Georg Dinkel goes to hell in polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Germany’s Georg Dinkel was the darling of the Synergy4 conference with his award-winning visions of heaven and hell in polymer.

His most recent small characters (which sold out quickly) allow him to complete a project in an evening. These creatures from hell (a la Hieronymus Bosch) give Georg a break from his complex architectural constructs that take months to build. The ship shown here was built over a metal gravy boat.

Synergy4 was a rich and energetic environment with perhaps the best presentations and most forward-looking projects yet. Georg has also posted some great shots from Synergy4.

My travel schedule continues and PCD posts will be sporadic for another week. In the meanwhile, please explore the archives and check in for updates. We’ll explore new ideas from Synergy4 at StudioMojo on Saturday. Join us there. 

The challenge of Synergy

Sage Bray reinterprets the Ice Plant for the Global Leaf Project

Lindly Haunani presented a lovely tour through the Global Leaf Brooch Design Challenge in a Synergy session yesterday. Lindly has graciously opened the Facebook group to the public so that you can scroll through the many entries like this Ice Plant brooch created by Sage Bray.

You’ll see the finished products and discover both their inspirations and their processes.

And you have a chance to join in! The project collected such interesting works from around the world that it will be ongoing. The details of the continuing effort will be posted shortly.

If you sense that I’m rushed, you’re right. Information and beauty swirl around the IPCA/Synergy4 conference participants and no one wants to miss a minute. Stay tuned for the full reports.

Glittering polymer

Alisa Levy's party necklace sparkles at Synergy4

Alisa Levy’s jaunty necklace caught my eye at Synergy. The jumble of circles and stripes looked a little Hundertwasser-ish as it sparkled brightly at the opening Synergy4 reception. I snapped a picture.

I’ve learned that the patterns are from a design transferred onto glitter clay. Alisa then colored it cleverly and the effect was perfect fun for the party.

The simplest shapes and techniques dazzle the eye and help make a party festive. I’ll tantalize you with a few more goodies from Synergy as the week progresses. I have to corner Alisa to learn more about her other business called Embrace Your Space.

Bohemian scraps

Pilar Rodriguez Dominguez masters her scraps on PolymerClayDaily.com

The Canary Islands’ Pilar Rodriguez Dominguez has mastered building canes and all the polymer basics. Now her work has taken a leap forward and what’s the reason? Scraps, of course!

Playing with scraps is often a freeing experience. There’s no wrong way and often you stumble into some very right accidents, especially when you have a strong color sense like Pilar does.

These bohemian beauties appear on her Instagram. You’ll see similar methods on her Etsy, Facebook, and Flickr pages and videos here and here.

Feeling stuck or restless? Go explore your scraps!

It’s Synergy time! We’ll be digging through the pre-conference scuttlebutt for this weekend’s StudioMojo. I’ll be reporting from the front lines so PCD posts will be juicy and fun and probably not on the regular schedule next week. 

Picasso polymer

Cecelia Leonini unleashes Picasso on polymer

Italy’s Cecilia Leonini (ImpasteArte) prolongs the bright colors of summer with this pendant inspired by Picasso’s Two Girls Reading.

On a 2.75 x 2.5″ area, Cecilia makes a collage of colors and sketches in the characters then colors the scene.

By using lots of colors and shapes piled on each other in a small space, Cecilia creates the illusion of a much bigger canvas. See more on Instagram, Facebook, and Etsy,

 

Lucky mysterious polymer

Elephants revisit Inga Rozenberga's studio (Kni-Kni) on PolymerClayDaily.com

Something about the simple striped cut out embellished with delicate appliques of tiny leaves and flowers adds up to a sweet mystery.

Inga Rozenberga’s (Kni-Kni) Latvian site doesn’t unravel the mystery or the meaning of the elephants that recur in her art. Do they indicate luck, good fortune, wisdom or something else entirely?

No matter! Her art enchants. What mysterious clues do you hide in your art?

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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