Freeing your goolies

Friesen's Goolies on PolymerClayDaily.com

Christie Friesen is possessed by Goolies, small polymer sculptures that fly from her fingers.

In Virginia an admiring crowd gathered around the oven, waiting to adopt the figments of Christi’s imagination. She really can’t say where or how the Goolies originate or what they mean. You can see on her Facebook page that she’s made legions of them. And they keep coming.

What do the gremlins, grouches and goofballs that live in your imagination look like? Have you ever tried to capture them in polymer?

Grow the forest

Help grow the forest on the exhibit's new website

Laura Tabakman, Emily Squires Levine and Julie Eakes, the creative forces behind the global collaborative Into the Forest exhibit created this series of 4″ caned flower brooches as part of a fundraising effort.

Sales of these and a smaller bar brooch series will help cover the costs of the exhibit and associated opening festivities in Pittsburgh at the Spinning Plate Gallery November 10-11. The show runs through the end of November. A teaser mini-installation will be unveiled at Synergy4 in August.

The curators have accumulated thousands of elements from 250 artists in 32 states and 22 countries that will be put together as a forest installation. While they are applying for grants and corporate sponsorships, you can also show your support and help grow the forest by picking a brooch from the exhibit’s new website/shop, intotheforestinstallation.com.

This Saturday’s StudioMojo will be filled with more super tips and tidbits from the Virginia conference. There’s still time to sign up and hear all the backstory. 

Hacking polymer

Benzon's shaved organics on PolymerClayDaily.com

If there’s a theme to the Virginia conference, it’s Hacking Polymer. In every corner of the workroom someone is slicing, gouging, carving raw polymer in new, more aggressive ways with tools borrowed from woodcarvers and manicurists.

Jana Roberts Benzon credits ceramicist Zemer Peled with inspiring her to try a small similar organic piece. This 3″ X 2″ experiment combines some of Jana’s Encrusted techniques with new shaved and carved threads of polymer.

Libby Mills rippled-bladed through clay in ways that turned a single block into a whole catalog of patterns. Stacy Shaffer zipped through the surface of her stripes to uncover fabric-like patterns perfect for trendy earrings. More on the new mayhem in this weekend’s StudioMojo.

If you’re ready for some hacking of your own, consider Claycino in Las Vegas beginning June 2 and sponsored by FIMO manufacturer, Staedtler. All course materials are supplied along with daily lunch and snacks, party fare and closing Bavarian banquet. Only few spots left in this exciting new event!

A tale of tags

Loew's tag necklace on PolymerClayDaily.com

This tag necklace from Baltimore’s Linda Loew is full of surprises. The dark gold polymer links are stamped, painted and textured in a dark and rough urban grunge style accented with red.

The pieces are thinner than you’d expect and slightly curved during curing. Each is individually shaped.

Linda heads for the fishing department for her findings that make the links twirl on connectors meant for lures. Here’s a second more colorful version.

The necklaces feel like they’re filled with stories…but Linda’s story is hard to find online. You can see a few more of her works on Pinterest.

 

Alphabet soup

Wujick's alphabet bowl on PolymerClayDaily.com

Virginia’s Tina Wujick cuts thick letters from polymer blends and connects them over a glass form. Sometimes she strengthens the joins with some Genesis thick medium (or other polymer glue).

There’s no rhyme or reason, you can’t read any message here but it’s a great teacher’s gift or just fun to enjoy. This photo of ingredients fills in the blanks.

Tina’s project should keep you busy while I play in Virginia. Look for fun photos all week.

Taking it easy

Kassel's limp and lovely leaves on PolymerClayDaily.com

Sure, you may have been impressed by the cheeky, funny characters that Doreen Gay Kassel has been creating for her Synergy4 presentation with Donna Greenberg (Translating Your Environment into Your Inspiration). Doreen’s characters are funny and engaging and quite complex.

Then she wows us with casual, offhand leaves that look as if they floated to the ground, ready to be raked. Their torn edges and folds show off lovely layers of colors with dots hidden in the recesses.

If you’ve worked with polymer for long you know what a trick it is to make our medium look easy, unforced and really organic. How does she do that? Will she and Donna reveal all at Synergy? You may enjoy some of her inspirations on Pinterest.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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