Layered and assembled elements

Mari O'Dell's assembled extruded pendants on PolymerClayDaily.com
Mari O'Dell's assembled extruded pendants on PolymerClayDaily.com

Mari O’Dell has been dreaming up Japanese-inspired pendants in her Annapolis, Maryland studio/treehouse.

She begins with castings made from segments of antique Japanese kashigata molds. Translucent polymer tinted to look like jadeite is pressed into the molds and cured. The elements are set aside to be assembled into finished pendants.

Mari uses a distinctive way layering on extruded Japanese design elements. Though she has limited strength in her hands, she’s devised clever extruder workarounds.

The piece is then surrounded by a bezel made of thin strips of clay and the entire work is mounted on clay backing. The final touches involve alcohol inks, heat set stamp inks and a final curing.

Follow along with more of her designs and experiments on her Instagram site.

Stringing and shopping

Katya Karavaeva’s (nikamiart) pendants glow with colors that are both dark and clear. Her pendants often have rings buried on the top from which she strings them to flatter each design.

This is not your usual drill-a-hole-and-grab-a-cord approach. Look at the multi-strand and braided cords that she’s paired with her beads on Instagram.

On sale now!

The catalog from the Into the Forest exhibit is a keeper, a souvenir of a monumental event. You can now order one online by following this link.

You might also want to click on Dan Cormier’s new online Single-Slice Mokume MasterClass which debuts in January. The pre-launch, early bird pricing ends at midnight tonight (Wednesday).

The Sculpey.com store is now open and PCD readers can get an extra grand opening discount by using the promo code PCD20%

Buzzing polymer

Annie Laurie's colors buzz on PolymerClayDaily.com
Annie Laurie's colors buzz on PolymerClayDaily.com

These polymer dragonfly links from California’s Annie Laura buzz with intense colors that are true to the season and the insect.

The torn, rough edges make them seem spontaneously caught and fossilized.

Annie Laura makes her own imprint molds. There’s something compelling about art that captures what you love. You can see the finished piece on her Instagram.

What do you love? Does your art capture it?

 

Can’t mute Meisha

Meisha Barbee goes for granite on PolymerClayDaily.com

Meisha Barbee takes her bright colors down a notch for this recent series. She admits that she’s found a new love in Premo Gray Granite with its speckles buried in a rich translucent polymer.

She’s fond of thinning sheets of granite and overlaying them on other colors for depth. You’ll note resonances of Jana Roberts Benzon in the dimensional shapes and find other influences in the graphic stamps and stripes.

Still, the composition is unmistakable Meisha. If you want to see more, come on over to StudioMojo this weekend for video of some of her tricks and shortcuts.

Colorful chaos

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New Mexico’s Barb Fajardo rolled out a new series of Controlled Chaos pendants that combine a smorgasbord of techniques. She shows off a mix of work in her recent posts on Facebook, Flickr, Pinterest and Instagram.

fajardo_pendant2

Her inundation of new pieces feels like the grand finale at the fireworks. It’s exciting and leaves us wondering, “Is there more?”

The southwest colors and simple shapes play a big part in the success of the pieces. Studio chaos is sometimes a good thing.

Bits and pieces

Isola on PCDaily

There’s so much energy in this series from France’s Caroline Cornic Isola (Klick-Art) that it’s hard to know where to focus. Your eyes dance between shapes and colors and land intermittently on black and white bits.

Thin lines lead you between elements. When you dive in for a closer look you’ll see that the colors aren’t solid but mottled and graduated. Each pendant is a little Miro-like composition.

Caroline bounces between comic illustration and painterly compositions in her polymer work. Look at her exuberant pieces on Facebook, Etsy and Pinterest.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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