Tempted by tribal

Tribal echoes resonate with Dani Kirova on PolymerClayDaily.com

UK’s Dani Kirova (temptedbyartjewelry) has been feeling tribal with a series of masks and images.

You’ll find shield shapes, geometric ethnic caned patterns and echoes of Africa in her works on Instagram. Whether she’s carving or caning, these images are strongly imprinted on her spirit.

They jump out from her other works. Instagram’s presentation of many pieces at a glance give you a quick overview of work and allow themes to emerge.

 

When you need to feel safe

Sometimes a neat, tidy, geometric polymer pendant hits the spot.

Spain’s Zazu Polymer Clay Jewelry convinces us that everything is under control when the news and the weather tell us anything but that.

If you need safety and predictability, see how Murcia Aranzazu (Zazu) creates sleek, bright, controlled jewelry on her website, Facebook and Instagram. Her Pinterest page lets you roam around in her inspirations.

Life lessons in polymer

Seana Bettencourt welcomes May with a new attitude on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ontario’s Seana Bettencourt has come through some health concerns and it looks like her creativity has been pumped into high gear.

These pendants (and more on FB) were made at a spring guild conference. Seana has taken bits of techniques she’s recently learned, mixed them with hard-won life lessons to make her own distinctive and stunning pendants that let her own spirit shine through. Exciting when that happens to us.

Layered and assembled elements

Mari O'Dell's assembled extruded pendants on PolymerClayDaily.com
Mari O'Dell's assembled extruded pendants on PolymerClayDaily.com

Mari O’Dell has been dreaming up Japanese-inspired pendants in her Annapolis, Maryland studio/treehouse.

She begins with castings made from segments of antique Japanese kashigata molds. Translucent polymer tinted to look like jadeite is pressed into the molds and cured. The elements are set aside to be assembled into finished pendants.

Mari uses a distinctive way layering on extruded Japanese design elements. Though she has limited strength in her hands, she’s devised clever extruder workarounds.

The piece is then surrounded by a bezel made of thin strips of clay and the entire work is mounted on clay backing. The final touches involve alcohol inks, heat set stamp inks and a final curing.

Follow along with more of her designs and experiments on her Instagram site.

Stringing and shopping

Katya Karavaeva’s (nikamiart) pendants glow with colors that are both dark and clear. Her pendants often have rings buried on the top from which she strings them to flatter each design.

This is not your usual drill-a-hole-and-grab-a-cord approach. Look at the multi-strand and braided cords that she’s paired with her beads on Instagram.

On sale now!

The catalog from the Into the Forest exhibit is a keeper, a souvenir of a monumental event. You can now order one online by following this link.

You might also want to click on Dan Cormier’s new online Single-Slice Mokume MasterClass which debuts in January. The pre-launch, early bird pricing ends at midnight tonight (Wednesday).

The Sculpey.com store is now open and PCD readers can get an extra grand opening discount by using the promo code PCD20%

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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