Working outdoors

These visitors are welcome in Gael Keyes' garage studio on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Mexico’s Gael Keyes works with the garage door open. It’s no wonder that she is visited by bugs.

She gently returns her inspirations back outside as she makes her own fantastical versions from leftover patterns and bits of shimmer. They’re delightful and harmless.

 

Well-dressed grasshopper brooch

Debbie Jackson captures a grasshopper in a glorious brooch on PolymerClayDaily.com

Get up close and personal with this polymer grasshopper brooch from Ohio’s Debbie Jackson to appreciate the patterns and the colors. The piece was a commission.

Don’t get too close. The creature is based on a species from India (Poekilocerus Pictus) that spits a jet of liquid at those who come too near (Debbie didn’t include that feature).

Even if you’re squeamish about bugs, you’ve got to admit that these guys really know how to dress in stripes and dots. Debbie has captured him in all his glory. Here’s Debbie on Instagram.


Debbie Jackson assembles a grasshopper on PolymerClayDaily.com

Oh wait! The bug at the right is real! Debbie had posted her in-progress shots in a Facebook group and I missed them. Thanks to Debbie for the clarification.

Build-a-bug

Watch Wanda Shum build a bug in 3 minutes on PolymerClayDaily.com

Sometimes watching an artist’s hands is so instructive and calming.

That’s what Canada’s (BC) Wanda Shum does in this 3-minute bug-building video. She’s in control, she knows what she’s doing. Sigh! Relax and watch.

Wow, that bug’s got a lot of wings! Who knew?

Wanda uses the littlest bits of canes to build an extravagant creature. Lots of wild variations crawl around on her site.

Captivated by moths

Daria Telegina makes the most of moths on PolymerClayDaily.com

Russia’s Daria Telegina (Balambeshka on IG) is smitten with moths.

Her Facebook and Instagram are filled with these exotic creatures which she refers to as cute things.

Each one is more complex than the last with exquisite details on their polymer wings, cane-slice antennae, and minutely textured bodies.

Don’t you wonder how she became fixated on moths? What do you feel compelled to make and why?

Garden elements

Cecile Bos will combine these elements into a garden scene on PolymerClayDaily.com

You probably have some questions about how France’s Cécile Bos (11prunes) creates these delicate canes.

How big are the original canes (these seem impossibly small), what’s her inspiration?

Cecile intends to mix up these canes. The white background surrounding each of them ensures that she can combine the elements into a larger botanical image.

Here’s a previous similar cane to give you an idea where she’s headed. Cecile brings a fabric designer’s sensibility to polymer. We are used to kaleidoscoping and repeating designs. These are complex canes from a different perspective.

There’s a fly in my clay

Edith Fischer Katz captures a fly on PolymerClayDaily.com

Forgive the pun. It was just too easy to smile and wince and admire this ambitious and detailed cane from Israel’s Edith Fischer Katz.

On her Instagram, she has compiled several in-process shots that document how she built the components for this large complex cane.

Edith uses these components in sculptures that are often edgy and alarming. See how she used an earlier crow cane here. Who knows what plans she’s hatching for the fly?

Going cuckoo

Gael Keyes goes a little cuckoo with outrageous birds on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Mexico’s Gael Keyes (@keyesgael) focused on bugs at last year’s Clayathon. This year she’s added outrageous fish and birds to her repertoire of wildlife.

Gael Keyes goes a little cuckoo with outrageous birds on PolymerClayDaily.com

Gael developed her own cane style that she pattern-matches in the Natasha bead way (here’s a quick tutorial) to create feathers, fins, and wings.

During the holidays she turns to her own brands of angels that you can see on Facebook.

Crawling into view

Gael Keyes creates beautiful bugs from scrap on PolymerClayDaily

Albuquerque’s Gael Keyes envisions fantastical bugs in polymer. Since her retirement from teaching last year, Gael has branched out into dolls and sculpture. It’s her bugs that keep crawling onto her Instagram and grabbing attention.

Gael collects her scraps and twists the colorful bits into Natasha canes. Sliced in half, matched, and shaped, these canes become wonderful wings, legs, and heads. She adds a few beads and wires for legs and antennae.

Insects come naturally to Gael and her bugs are quite beautiful. Scroll down her Instagram to see her fall and winter creatures.

Beachwear for the cause

Randee Ketzel creates a polymer bra for the cause on PolymerClayDaily.com

Texas’ Randee Ketzel shows off her submission for the Breast Cancer Resource Center’s annual gala.

Randee made the flowers for Cancer, Don’t Bug Me in Carol Simmon’s class and added her own sculpted iridescent bugs. The creation will be modeled by Randee’s friend and cancer survivor Darla Breazle.

While it’s not exactly beachwear, a project like this gives you an opportunity to stretch your imagination for a good cause.

Join us as we cover more polymer finds and finery that will inspire you in this weekend’s edition of StudioMojo.