Mix and match scrap

Seattle’s Susan Hyde’s Madonnas (7″ x 3″) aren’t technically from scrap but her textiles are stunningly vibrant and she reconfigures her canes in a variety of ways to extend their usefulness. She mixes and matches endlessly and drapes slices of her fabrics so that they become ethnic dress on this compelling symbol of motherhood.

Her method is a variation on a theme that Kathy Amt taught us years ago and in Susan’s hands, it still looks fresh and contemporary.

Susan’s online presence is on Facebook and her site. She was scheduled to demo her skills at Collective Visions Gallery next weekend but was sidelined with a broken arm this week. Get well fast wishes to Susan.

Lam’s leaves

Lam's leaves on PolymerClayDaily.com

Loretta Lam keeps me coasting on photos taken at last week’s conference. These lightweight sculpted leaves are not-quite-finished samples for an upcoming European class.

Even unsanded the shapes were silky smooth. Loretta lays thin fabric-like veneers over FIMOairlight bases.

Thank you for your comments on yesterday’s post that taught me another meaning of the word goolies. While the creatures in the Christi Friesen post are cute, some goolies are certainly better kept not so free!

Collages to wear

Doroshow's fabric/jewelry wall art on PolymerClayDaily.com

Florida’s Dayle Doroshow will exhibit six mixed-media wall hangings in a popular restaurant (Le Tournesol) near her summer home in Durfort, France.

Each collaged fabric panel is 5′ x 2 1/2′ and is embellished with polymer. Each contains a brooch that can be removed to wear.

Doroshow's fabric collages with polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

I can almost hear the sighs of students who have experienced the charms of a week of classes at La Cascade. Karen and Ann Mitchell, Dayle, Doreen Kassel and Loretta Lam will all have polymer workshops there this summer.

Monday mashup in polymer

Hyde on PCDaily

What would happen if last week’s elephant met up with a kangaroo? In Susan Hyde’s mind we’d have a Kangarat/Eleroo like this 10″ one she’s constructed from polymer.

Susan has joined a gallery in Bremerton, Washington. For poetry month, she and her fellow artists illustrated poems by local poets. The one Susan chose, The Bainbridge Zoo, chronicles an elephant and kangaroo affair.

Another poem called Gypsy inspired this 12″ piece filled with the great polymer fabrics that Susan is known for. Here’s her old fabric tutorial that I have to drag out again because it’s my favorite.

Coarse weave polymer

This newest faux polymer experiment from France’s Sylvie Peraud may take you back to the 80’s. Didn’t you own a sofa made of this material? With roman shades to match?

It makes me smile to think that the coarse weave is back in fashion and that Sylvie has mastered it in polymer. When you zoom in, you’ll swear it’s real.

Go to her site and her Flickr pages. I think we’ll be seeing more. Have a nostalgic weekend.

Chandler’s polymer experiments

Gera Scott Chandler's lantern experiment

Gera Scott Chandler fearlessly fuses polymer clay with digital photography, canvas, silk, inks, acrylics and found objects to create textured three dimensional interpretations of the mood and spirit of her west coast Canadian landscapes. Gera often incorporates beachcombing ephemera into her compositions.

It was her Arbutus mixed media collage on canvas in the Synergy exhibit that helped fuel recent experiments by other artists in combining liquid polymer and fabrics. Her research and development is constant (the lantern at left is a recent example).

Chandler's resin and polymer ring

Gera has moved on to combining polymer and resins and offers the results of her experiments for comparison shoppers. She has a way of bringing remarkable colors to polymer and she’s working to enhance those colors further with resin.

Following Gera’s work is like being on an adventure that leads from the beach to the garden to the studio.

Hewitt’s cane-inspired fabric

You may be used to making polymer clay buttons to match fabric, here’s an idea that turns the tables. The picture isn’t great but the concept is terrific.

Enterprising polymer clay artist and seamstress Jema Hewitt has begun using Spoonflower, a print-on-demand fabric company in North Carolina, to make fabric from photos of her polymer clay canes.

She explains that, “I just took a photo of my polymer clay slab, tweaked it and cropped it in photoshop and saved a 300dpi jpg. The polymer clay is on the left, the fabric on the right of the photo!” Click on the picture and look closely to get the full effect.

The UK artist is considering producing a line of corsets or waistcoats from her polymer-inspired companion material. While corsets were certainly not the first items that popped into my head, Jema has 20 years experience in the theatre, bridal and costuming business and after a browse through her sites (Kindred Spirits, Steampunk Jewellery, Etsy and her blog SparklyJem) you’ll see how it’s a natural next step for this designer.

It’s an exciting concept to consider at the start of your week.

Doroshow’s polymer theme

Dayle Doroshow’s polymer clay and fabric brooches are part of her larger body of works inspired by her visits to the gardens at Versailles Palace. The bottom layer of petals (see the back of a brooch here) and the center of the flowers are polymer.

Her bracelets on a fabric band (part of the same theme) were a hit with all who saw them and I scored one for helping her spiff up her web site.

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