Tie-dyed polymer canes

Newberg on PCDaily

If you’ve been around polymer for a while you may, like me, think you’ve seen every cane possible. But then a cane brain like Meg Newberg shows her newest ways to make an imitative indigo dye cane and you shake your head in wonder. That soft-edged tie-dye look is challenging in polymer.

Her monthly cane subscription is one of the best deals out there. Each month she emails subscribers cane tutorials that baffle and delight.

Newberg on PCDaily

I’m off to the studio to try this. Here’s a sampling of my first efforts. It took me several tries to get the hang of it.

You can sign up with Meg or buy back issues on her Etsy site and follow her on Facebook.

Remarkable bits

Geisen on PCDaily

It’s not easy to salvage that sweet bit of polymer veneer and turn it into something wearable and delightfully designed. That’s why these earrings from Minnesota’s Jan Geisen caught my eye.

She has a way of putting geometric shapes together in a way that makes them both simple and remarkable. She leans toward muted imitative stone patterns or watercolor-like washes of color. These earrings measure 1/4″ x 1 3/4″. The black rectangle attaches to the earwire and surrounds the patterned slab.

On Jan’s Flickr pages you’ll see more examples of her mix-and-match stacking style. She’s compiled a great stash of inspirations on Pinterest.

Polymer crystals

Wallis on PCDaily

The UK’s Claire Wallis used translucent and metallic clays plus paint as she experimented with her imitative rock crystal ring. She plans to tweak and explore what she’s discovered and we’ll plan to watch!

This new work is a departure from the large and intricate complex canes that she demos on Facebook. She shows more on her site and on Flickr.

 

 

Exotic polymer

Zehler on PCDaily

What would you find if you scooped up a handful from Nikki Zehler’s bead stash? Pyrite? Porcelain? Polymer? If LoveRoot is missing a color or needs more texture she turns to polymer to fill the gaps.

Zehler on PCDaily

The earrings to the left include chunks of pyrite along with African baule beads. The rusty textured chunks are polymer.

The distressed earring bells to the right? Yep, they’re polymer. The big bead in the bracelet is the only polymer there. Nikki lets her eye guide her, not the material.

Zehler on PCDaily

This exotic gypsy sensibility comes from wild Ohio! Who would have guessed? See loads more on Facebook, Etsy and Pinterest.

Smelly stones

Sorlien on PCDaily

You may not be drawn to Sarah Sorlien’s polymer imitative rock but there are plenty of dogs who love it!

This Philadelphia physician makes Odor Stones, hollow polymer stones that are used as hiding places for dog training and competitions. She creates these functional faux stones for a canine sport called Nosework. Now you understand the holes.

Sarah says she learned rock basics from my online class and then added her own magic ingredient – cement. “Add a little liquid clay if it gets too powdery,” she suggests. It’s cheaper than embossing powders and was already available in the garage. “Don’t get it near your eyes,” physician Sarah cautions. See more of her examples on Pinterest.

An interesting diversion from jewelry on a Thursday. PCD took an interesting diversion too and stopped posting on schedule. Technological spring fever!

Wedgwood imitations

Powers on PCDaily

Heather Powers’ Wedgwood Pottery-inspired beads contain promises of a new season. Her imitative Jasperware beads feature raised white relief sculpture on matte backgrounds in spring colors. Here the Wedgwood beads are paired with leafy designs and topped by birds.

Heather is one busy blogger! Tonight she presents her tips for Promoting Your Jewelry Business Online to the Baltimore Bead Society. She’s gathered her source material, over 300 articles for artists/sellers, into one hugely helpful Creative Biz Pinterest board.

She operates multiple shops and teaches on cruises, workshops, bootcamps and retreats. She writes books. She blogs and connects like crazy. Go marvel at her talents and don’t miss her free jewelry tutorials!

Polymer beach finds

Niese on PCDaily

Sandra Deyoung Niese’s (DandyBeads) imitative beach finds look appealing on her Etsy site at this time of year. She lives in Michigan but her heart and her polymer designs live in a warmer climate.

This 2″ wire-wrapped pendant is painted with sea blue and sand acrylics and delicately distressed with sea urchin patterns.

If you need some sun and sand to brighten your day, look at Sandra’s beautifully wave-washed polymer pieces on Facebook and Pinterest. This one’s sold. I’m wearing a pretty piece of beach on a cord to ward off snow. It’s not working but I don’t care.

Twofer Friday

Leonini on PCDaily

It’s a twofer Friday to tide you through the weekend.

Cecelia Leonini’s Surreal necklace stands on its own even as it contains echoes from Iris Mishly, Nikolina Otrzan and other artists working with textures and inks. (Cecelia credits Nikolina’s and Iris’ tutorials.)

Note how the three main pieces were cut from one image. This painterly approach is being played with widely and moves polymer in new directions. Cecelia’s progress is documented on Flickr and Facebook.

Krichevskaya on PCDaily

If you’re looking for some warmth this weekend, let Russia’s Anna Krichevskaya bundle you up in a tweedy blue bangle. The heathered colors of her extruded faux knit resemble the big bulky sweaters sure to beat the chill. There’s more on Flickr. Stay warm.

Semi-precious polymer

Belchi on PCDaily

Ana Belchi’s imitation agates sit comfortably surrounded by rough black bezels suspended from sleek brass bails.

See how this Madrid artist’s polymer semi-precious lookalikes move beyond modest beach stones.

She says she’s wanted to explore stones for years and finally hit upon designs that work. You can see them on Flickr and Facebook.

Belchi on PCDaily

Going bigger

Brady on PCDaily

Arizona’s Marlene Brady likes big beads. In this case they’re chunky ceramic-looking polymer beads with loads of texture.

This is as large as she’s let herself go since the textures and layers of colors add visual weight. Does she dare go bigger? When you’re having fun, it’s hard to pull back on the reins!

See where she’s headed on her blog, Pinterest, and Flickr.