Nine ways to Sunday – FREE

Jane Hewitt gathers the mokume gane variations into one neat booklet that's free

Holidays are a perfect time to try something fun, easy, and no-fail. Hello, mokume gane!

Problem is there are variations nine ways to Sunday! You’ve got your deep, shallow, scrap, ghost, and natural methods.

For your holiday polymer pleasure, follow this free link from the UK’s Jane Hewitt, who gathers a slew of approaches to the technique into one nicely-illustrated .pdf booklet to download.

If you feel like giving to Jane’s charity, that would be lovely. Donate on the LimbBo page.

Christmas mystery solved

Cynthia discovers matching earrings from Karen McCorkle in her Christmas collection on PolymerClayDaily

As I layered up for the snow today, I figured out why I had these plain Jane earrings in my collection.

They’re the companions for this Karen McCorckle beautifully caned angel pin that I love. Oh, that goes back a couple of interesting decades!

Karen told us that she conditioned clay when she went to the movies with her family. In the darkened theatre, she could twist and knead the stiff version of polymer that we used back then. Her production schedule was so tight that she couldn’t waste any time.

Can anyone update us on Karen?

Long ago and before hearts

Dayle Doroshow or Ron Lehocky? The answer may surprise you on PolymerClayDaily.com https://wp.me/pegT3-7pB

When Ron Lehocky asked me several years ago who made this dotted square pin that I was wearing, I replied confidently, “Dayle Doroshow.” He corrected me. “I made that,” he said. This is a Ron Lehocky collector’s item!

Long ago and far away when Ron first started dipping into polymer, he made pins that weren’t heart-shaped and weren’t made from others’ scraps. That was 51,000 hearts ago! Hard to believe he’s raised that much for The Kids’ Center for Pediatric Therapies!

Ron pointed me to his 2015 tutorial on PCD that shows how to turn a heart into a Christmas tree. That was from when he had made a mere 30,000 hearts.

Oh, and Dayle Doroshow? She’s lived and taught in France (and Florida) for the past twenty years. And now she’s written a book about her art and life there. Time flies!

 

The history channel

Susan Hyde's polymer madonnas are favorites on PolymerClayDaily.com

In my quest to bring more fun into what I do, I decided to refashion PCD into the “History Channel” for a while. The history of polymer, that is.

As I pinned Susan Hyde’s angel on my down vest this morning, I thought about the works and the artists who have caught my eye since 2005. I’ll be thumbing through my collection for pieces that moved me to shell out money and made me feel so good that I wear them over and over. This clever ploy requires less time online and reacquaints me with my collection.

Susan’s angels always call to me during the holidays. Her madonnas were dark-skinned before that was a statement. She and I met at a weeklong Kathy Amt class on Whidbey Island in 1997 and she’s high up on my list of favorite artists. Her polychromatic color sense and affinity for textiles, inclusions, and faces, get me every time.  Click on the Instagram link to look more closely at her construction. If you put “Hyde” into the search box at the top of this page, you’ll see how she’s been my go-to girl for years. Here she is on Facebook.

The trap of looking easy

Vasso Tzima makes charming ornaments look simple on PolymerClayDaily.com https://wp.me/pegT3-7pl

Every once in a while a polymer artist like Vasso Tizma (ClaylandStudio) from Greece makes us think that we can all be polymer clay sculptors.

You’d think we’d learn that “making it look easy” is a trap. I’m trying to resist rolling out some red and green clay and giving it a go. Is there time to become an expert before the holidays? Hope springs eternal.

Plan B is her Etsy shop.

Spirits from the woods

Ohio mother and daughter give polymer bodies to the faces they find in the woods on PolymerClayDaily.com https://wp.me/pegT3-7p2

Ohio mother-daughter duo Keri Parker and Mikayla Beavan (kurumi_kodama) created these haunting, earthy walnut tree spirits using shells with round polymer bellies.

“I found some walnut shells on the ground back in our woods and thought they looked like little disembodied faces. I knew somehow I needed to give them bodies,” says mom Keri.

These magical creatures appear every week or two on their site and disappear quickly.


Discover more polymer magic in the weekend StudioMojo. For your free sample, shoot me an email.

Geodes from SusanaLand

Susana Martinez created her own land during the pandemic on PolymerClayDaily.com

New York’s Susana Martinez popped up in the feed today wearing a big bold necklace she made for a Santiago event.

I went on the prowl to get to know her. She had been in the fashion industry for over 20 years when the pandemic forced her to create a land of her own, SusanaLand.

It houses her jewelry collections, her fashion line, and even showcases her mother’s hand-woven wares.

Her mokume gane meets geodes meets resin in a wonky, cheery jumble of styles perfect for today.

Reduced obsolescence

Jude Radwanski (firefly art jewellery) resists obsolescence and so do we all!

Saskatchewan’s Jude Radwanski (Firefly Art Jewellery) scratches and scribes polymer jewelry as she works to create jewelry that enhances the designs of clothing manufacturers and retailers.

“Polymer clay is extremely durable and suits my commitment to reduced obsolescence,” she says defiantly.


No obsolescence here at PCD either. I’ve skittered around the globe and across the country, checking in with polymer friends around the globe in a burst of post-pandemic energy. Were you beginning to worry? Nah, I’m fine and ready to settle in at the computer after one more trip west this month. 

Plenty of pretties that you need to see! Stay tuned.  CT

Fall front and center

Diane Kremer is feeling fall with new earrings on PolymerClayDaily.com

Colorado’s Diane Kremer packages up fall in a simple pair of earrings. Subtly textured shades of orange/red/gold circles stack like a pile of leaves.

The wire that ties it all together is featured front and center. Why not?


This week’s StudioMojo wraps up my last event as I head out for another one.  We’ve been cooped up too long! All that pent-up energy has to be unleashed! Come on over and see what’s new and where it’s coming from.

Cold cut flowers

Jenny Patterson slices extruded flower canes after they are fired on PolymerClayDaily

Maintaining the shape of extruded polymer clay flower canes as you reduce them is nearly impossible. At a recent gathering, Minnesota’s Jenny Patterson reminded me of a clever workaround.

She extrudes her canes and slices them after they’re cured!

Jenny sells at big shows (she’ll be at the Balloon show in Albuquerque) so her production skills are well honed.

She cuts the cured extrusions once they’re cool or slightly re-warms them to make them pliable depending on the brand of clay. Try it both ways to see what your clay prefers. She punches a hole in each thin slice with hole punch pliers.

Her flowers are made using extruded stacks of disks of clay colors (a la Bettina Welker) with her own extruder disk designs.


We’ll be talking about several newly learned lessons (and cool new tools that make them happen) in this week’s StudioMojo. A week off the grid did my heart and my brain good. Come see why.